0

Sorry if this is a dup; I haven't found any questions that pose quite this same problem.

The issue is illustrated by this screenshot, ironically taken from a CSS blog site (it's immediately below the text "In order to set a positioning context".) I've been hitting the same issue in my own code.

About halfway down this image, there's a line with a long comment that forces the enclosing div to provide a horizontal scrollbar (via the overflow: auto setting.) As shown in the screenshot, the surrounding lines with gray backgrounds don't stretch to fill the entire width of the parent's canvas. Instead, they remain fixed at the width of the parent's viewport. (Those backgrounds belong to divs that enclose individual lines of text.)

I see this in Firefox 3.1 and IE8 (regardless of IE7 compatibility mode.)

Is there any cross-browser method to force those child divs to stretch to the full width of the canvas (or put another way, to set their widths to the max width of their peers)? My guess is "no", or the site's author would be using it.

alt text
(source: outofwhatbox.com)

EDIT: Here is a bare-bones example. For some reason, the scrollbar doesn't show in IE, but it does show in Firefox 3.1 (and with the same behavior that I'm seeing elsewhere.)

Note: The CSS shown here is derived from SyntaxHighlighter
(http://alexgorbatchev.com/), released under GPL 3.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <title>sample</title>

<style type="text/css">

.syntaxhighlighter .line.alt1 .content {
    background-color:#FFFFFF !important;
}


.syntaxhighlighter .line .content {
    color:#000000 !important;
    display:block !important;
    font-family: "Consolas","Monaco","Bitstream Vera Sans Mono","Courier New",Courier,monospace;
    font-size: 12pt;
    font-weight: 400;
    color: #000000;
    white-space: nowrap;
}

.syntaxhighlighter .line.alt2 .content {
    background-color:#F0F0F0 !important;
}

.syntaxhighlighter {
    background-color:#E7E5DC !important;
    margin:1em 0 !important;
    padding:1px !important;
    width:497px !important;
    height: auto !important;
}

.line {
    overflow:visible !important;
}

.lines {
    overflow-x:auto !important;
}
 </style>

  </head>
  <body>
<div class="syntaxhighlighter" >
  <div class="lines">
    <div class="line alt1">
      <span class="content">
        <span style="margin-left: 0px ! important;" class="block">
          <code class="plain">this is line 1 </code>
        </span>
      </span>
    </div>
    <div class="line alt2">
      <span class="content">
        <span style="margin-left: 20px ! important;" class="block">
          <code class="plain">this is line 2</code>
        </span>
      </span>
    </div>
    <div class="line alt1">
      <span class="content">
        <span style="margin-left: 40px ! important;" class="block">
          <code class="plain">this is a very very very very very very long line number 3</code>
        </span>
      </span>
    </div>
    <div class="line alt2">
      <span class="content">
        <span style="margin-left: 0px ! important;" class="block">
          <code class="keyword">this is line 4</code>
        </span>
      </span>
    </div>
    <div class="line alt1">
      <span class="content">
        <span style="margin-left: 20px ! important;" class="block">
          <code class="plain">and this is line 5.</code>
        </span>
      </span>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

UPDATE 2009/05/14: Here's the script that I've deployed, based on brianpeiris's answer below. In case anyone's interested, here's a more detailed description of the changes that were needed.

// Ensure that each content <span> is sized to fit the width of the scrolling region.
// (When there is no horizontal scrollbar, use the width of the parent.)
fixContentSpans : function() {
    jQuery('.syntaxhighlighter > div.lines').each(function(){
        var container = jQuery(this);
        var scrollWidth = this.scrollWidth;
        var width = jQuery(this).width();
        var contents = container.find('.content');
        jQuery(contents).each(function(){
            var child = jQuery(this);
            var widthAvail = 
                scrollWidth - parseFloat(child.css("margin-left"))  
                - parseFloat(child.css("padding-left"))
                - parseFloat(child.css("padding-right"));
            var borderLeft = parseFloat(child.css("border-left-width"));
            // IE uses names (e.g. "medium") for border widths, resulting in NaN
            // when we parse the value.  Rather than trying to get the numeric
            // value, we'll treat it as 0. This may add a few additional pixels 
            // in the scrolling region, but probably not enough to worry about.
            if (!isNaN(borderLeft)) {
                widthAvail -= borderLeft;
            }
            child.width(widthAvail);
        });
    });
},
  • It would behoove you to reduce this to a code snippet that people could copy locally and play with to find a solution. It's just too hard otherwise. – cletus May 2 '09 at 19:38
  • I was hoping this was a known problem, and someone could answer "yes" or "no" quickly enough :-) I'll work on producing a code sample, but won't be able to do it right away. – Dan Breslau May 2 '09 at 19:41
4

If you don't mind a bit of jQuery, run the following code in Firebug on the nettuts+ website to fix the problem.

$('.dp-highlighter').each(function(){
  var container = $(this);
  if(this.scrollWidth !== $(this).width()) {
    container.children().each(function(){
      var child = $(this);
      var childPaddingLeft = parseInt(child.css('paddingLeft').slice(0, -2));
      child.width(container.get(0).scrollWidth - childPaddingLeft);
    });
  }
});

Edit: Seems to work in IE7/8 as well.

Further Edit: Here's the JavaScript necessary to fix the code you provided:

$('.syntaxhighlighter > div').each(function(){
  var container = $(this);
  if(this.scrollWidth !== $(this).width()) {
    container.find('.content').each(function(){
      var child = $(this);
      child.width(container.get(0).scrollWidth);
    });
  }
});

Demo

I've hosted your code on JS Bin with the JavaScript fix: http://jsbin.com/axeso

  • This looks promising, but I haven't been able to make it work with the code in my sample (see update above.) Note that my sample uses "syntaxhighlighter" as the class for the top-level div; I assumed that I should change the script to match. – Dan Breslau May 3 '09 at 5:18
  • Excellent! Thanks! – Dan Breslau May 3 '09 at 16:24
  • 1
    You're welcome! Glad I could help. – brianpeiris May 3 '09 at 17:36
  • Thought you might be interested in the update above. Also, I've blogged about this at outofwhatbox.com/blog/2009/05/… . Thanks again. – Dan Breslau May 15 '09 at 1:47
  • Wow Dan! An excellent write-up and thanks for the shout-out, I am honoured (/me bows). I might open another can of worms by mentioning this but if you really want to avoid jQuery I don't think that re-writing the code would be too difficult since the jQuery parts that you've used only constitute a small portion of the jQuery code. Anyway, I think you've greatly improved SyntaxHighlighter, enough for the original devs to incorporate your changes. (You glossed over the change to the line numbers but that's more significant IMO ;) ). Great job! – brianpeiris May 15 '09 at 6:09
1

I don't think there is a way to stretch the divs to be the whole width. The problem is that the text isn't really inside of the div. It is overflowing outside of the div of the line (that contains the shading)

One solution is to use a table. Use a table row to hold each row of the source code.

Following is a code sample. The first container uses divs, and the second uses a table.

<style>
    .container {
        width: 300px;
        overflow: auto;
    }
    .lineA {
        height: 20px;
        overflow: visible;
    }
    .lineB {
        height: 20px;
        background-color: #888888;
        overflow: visible;
    }
</style>

<div class="container">
    <div class="lineA">Hello World</div>
    <div class="lineB">Hello World</div>
    <div class="lineA">Hello World</div>
    <div class="lineB">Hello World</div>
    <div class="lineA">Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.</div>
    <div class="lineB">Hello World</div>
</div>

<div class="container">
<table>
    <tr><td class="lineA">Hello World</td></tr>
    <tr><td class="lineB">Hello World</td></tr>
    <tr><td class="lineA">Hello World</td></tr>
    <tr><td class="lineB">Hello World</td></tr>
    <tr><td class="lineA">Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.&nbsp;Really&nbsp;Long&nbsp;Line.</td></tr>
    <tr><td class="lineB">Hello World</td></tr>
</table>
</div>

Here is a screenshot:

alt text http://img354.imageshack.us/img354/9418/csstest.png

1

Just tested this and it seems to work, even way back to ie6.

#wrapper{width:300px; height:100px;border:1px solid black; overflow:auto;position:relative;}
#inner{width:auto;position:absolute;}
.content{white-space:pre;height:20px;width:auto;overflow:show;}
.alt {background:gray;}

<div id="wrapper">
<div id="inner">
    <div class="content">content content content content content content content content content </div>
    <div class="content alt">content content content content content content content content content </div>
</div>
</div>

The one downside is that you have to specify the height of the wrapper or the whole thing collapses vertically. You could use javascript to fix this though (wrapper height = number of content divs * height of a content div).

  • I'm afraid this doesn't do what I was looking for. Try adding two more (shorter) lines, and I think you'll see what I mean: <div class="content">malcontent</div> <div class="content alt">malcontent </div> – Dan Breslau May 3 '09 at 4:23
  • hmmm - you could try using the faux columns css technique sideways? If you're not familiar with it, it would involve using a background image on the inner div,repeated in both x and y directions, 1 px wide, and essentially a vertical cross-section of 2 rows. If that needws better explanatuion let me know – wheresrhys May 3 '09 at 10:33

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