4

I have a list of classes, but different children have different properties that need to be displayed.

What I want to achieve is to have a listbox-type control in the gui which enables each child to display it's properties the way it wants to - so not using the same pre-defined columns for every class.

I envisage something like the transmission interface (below), where each class can paint it's own entry, showing some text, progress bar if relevant, etc.

enter image description here

How can this be achieved in C#?

Thanks for any help.

  • 2
    Silverlight, WPF or WinForms? – Daniel A. White Nov 16 '11 at 17:42
  • 3
    C# is not a GUI, what GUI toolkit do you use? Winforms? WPF? SilverLight? – Albin Sunnanbo Nov 16 '11 at 17:43
15

Let your list items implement an interface that provides everything needed for the display:

public interface IDisplayItem
{
    event System.ComponentModel.ProgressChangedEventHandler ProgressChanged;
    string Subject { get; }
    string Description { get; }
    // Provide everything you need for the display here
}

The transmission objects should not display themselves. You should not mix domain logic (business logic) and display logic.

Customized ListBox: In order to do display listbox items your own way, you will have to derive your own listbox control from System.Windows.Forms.ListBox. Set the DrawMode property of your listbox to DrawMode.OwnerDrawFixed or DrawMode.OwnerDrawVariable (if the items are not of the same size) in the constructor. If you use OwnerDrawVariable then you will have to override OnMeasureItem as well, in order to tell the listbox the size of each item.

public class TransmissionListBox : ListBox
{
    public TransmissionListBox()
    {
        this.DrawMode = DrawMode.OwnerDrawFixed;
    }

    protected override void OnDrawItem(DrawItemEventArgs e)
    {
        e.DrawBackground();
        if (e.Index >= 0 && e.Index < Items.Count) {
            var displayItem = Items[e.Index] as IDisplayItem;
            TextRenderer.DrawText(e.Graphics,displayItem.Subject,e.Font,...);
            e.Graphics.DrawIcon(...);
            // and so on
        }
        e.DrawFocusRectangle();
    }
}

You can let your original transmission class implement IDisplayItem or create a special class for this purpose. You can also have different types of objects in the list, as long as they implement the interface. The point is, that the display logic itself is in the control, the transmission class (or whatever class) only provides the information required.

Example: Because of the ongoing discussion with Mark, I have decided to include a full example here. Let's define a model class:

public class Address : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private string _Name;
    public string Name
    {
        get { return _Name; }
        set
        {
            if (_Name != value) {
                _Name = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Name");
            }
        }
    }

    private string _City;
    public string City
    {
        get { return _City; }
        set
        {
            if (_City != value) {
                _City = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("City");
                OnPropertyChanged("CityZip");
            }
        }
    }

    private int? _Zip;
    public int? Zip
    {
        get { return _Zip; }
        set
        {
            if (_Zip != value) {
                _Zip = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Zip");
                OnPropertyChanged("CityZip");
            }
        }
    }

    public string CityZip { get { return Zip.ToString() + " " + City; } }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return Name + "," + CityZip;
    }

    #region INotifyPropertyChanged Members

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        var handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }

    #endregion
}

Here is a custom ListBox:

public class AddressListBox : ListBox
{
    public AddressListBox()
    {
        DrawMode = DrawMode.OwnerDrawFixed;
        ItemHeight = 18;
    }

    protected override void OnDrawItem(DrawItemEventArgs e)
    {
        const TextFormatFlags flags = TextFormatFlags.Left | TextFormatFlags.VerticalCenter;

        if (e.Index >= 0) {
            e.DrawBackground();
            e.Graphics.DrawRectangle(Pens.Red, 2, e.Bounds.Y + 2, 14, 14); // Simulate an icon.

            var textRect = e.Bounds;
            textRect.X += 20;
            textRect.Width -= 20;
            string itemText = DesignMode ? "AddressListBox" : Items[e.Index].ToString();
            TextRenderer.DrawText(e.Graphics, itemText, e.Font, textRect, e.ForeColor, flags);
            e.DrawFocusRectangle();
        }
    }
}

On a form, we place this AddressListBox and a button. In the form, we place some initializing code and some button code, which changes our addresses. We do this in order to see, if our listbox is updated automatically:

public partial class frmAddress : Form
{
    BindingList<Address> _addressBindingList;

    public frmAddress()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        _addressBindingList = new BindingList<Address>();
        _addressBindingList.Add(new Address { Name = "Müller" });
        _addressBindingList.Add(new Address { Name = "Aebi" });
        lstAddress.DataSource = _addressBindingList;
    }

    private void btnChangeCity_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        _addressBindingList[0].City = "Zürich";
        _addressBindingList[1].City = "Burgdorf";
    }
}

When the button is clicked, the items in the AddressListBox are updated automatically. Note that only the DataSource of the listbox is defined. The DataMember and ValueMember remain empty.

| improve this answer | |
  • I don't think I quite understand. So would you have a separate class that handles the displaying, is bound to a list item and can be added to the listbox control? So would it be possible to have different items showing different properties? Do you have any links or examples to explain this further? Thanks! – Mark Nov 17 '11 at 10:17
  • Thank you for the updates. I will give it a go! It will certainly give me a starting point to learn from.. – Mark Nov 18 '11 at 9:12
  • 1
    In WinForms you trigger the Repaint of a control by calling the Invalidate() method (or one of overloads). myListBox.Invalidate();. The IDisplayItem interface could have a float Progress { get; } property which exposes the current state of the transmission. At each change of a property exposed by IDisplayItem you will have to invalidate the listbox. Another way to go is to use data binding. Bind your listbox to an object-binding source and implement INotifyPropertyChanged in your displayed items. The magic of data binding will then let the listbox display the changes automatically! – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 21 '11 at 14:19
  • 1
    I made some tests. It seems to work better if you use a System.ComponentModel.BindingList<T>. In my test I converted the List<T> into a binding list: var bindingList = new BindingList<Address>(addressList); addressBindingSource.DataSource = bindingList;. I did not set the Display or ValueMember. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 22 '11 at 21:30
  • 1
    OK, I based my previous statements on a code, which did other things as well, what caused confusion. I decided to make a full example in order to create clear facts (see EDIT #2). Mark you are right, if a BindingList<T> is used, no BindingSource is required. The example uses solely a BindingList<T>. – Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 23 '11 at 14:26
1

yes, if you use WPF it is quite easy to do this. All you have to do is make a different DataTemplate for your different types.

MSDN for data templates
Dr. WPF for Items Control & Data Templates

| improve this answer | |
  • Unfortunately, I am on WinForms. Sorry for not saying in my original post. But the links look great for WPF - exactly the sort of thing I am trying to do. – Mark Nov 17 '11 at 10:14

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.