12

In my Django project I have to do repeatedly some processing in the background. This processing needs access to Django stuff, so I put it into Django's commands and run it as cronjob. Right now I realize, that I have to do some of them more frequently (cronjob has limitation to invoke command at most every 1 minute). Another problem is that I don't have enough control, to protect running the same command in one time. It's happen when one processing takes longer than one minute. I think that I should run them like daemons, but I am looking for pure way to do it with Django. Have you ever faced with this problem or know any clean solution for it?

13

We do a lot of background processing for django using Celery http://celeryproject.org/. It requires some effort to set up and there is a bit of a learning curve, but once it's up and running it's just awesome.

  • 1
    Same here. RabbitMQ + Celery + django-celery. – Jordan Nov 16 '11 at 18:15
  • Here too. Celery rocks. – jterrace Nov 16 '11 at 20:51
  • In your experience, is Celery a little bit of overkill for simple messaging queues in Django? I've look into it before and although it runs well, I thought it was way to much for my particular use case. Do you agree or am I overlooking something? Any downside to using a daemons at OP suggested above? – ChrisC May 23 '13 at 11:04
  • depending on the definition of "simple messaging queues" - yes ;) – Dmitry B. May 23 '13 at 17:01
  • a scheduled job is not the same as a daemon process. – Alex Sep 22 '16 at 20:02
3

We took more simple approach - write the script as normal script with endless loop that iterate through a queryset and then use supervise to manage it as a daemon. Basically, this is all needed to have the daemon running:-

$ sudo apt-get install daemontools daemontools-run
$ mkdir /etc/service/sendmsevad
$ echo -> /etc/service/sendmsevad/run
#!/bin/bash
exec /usr/local/bin/sendmsgd
$ sudo svc -d  /etc/service/sendmsgd
$ sudo svc -u  /etc/service/sendmsgd
$ sudo svstat /etc/service/sendmsgd
/etc/service/sendmsg: up (pid 10521) 479 seconds

More about this - How do I daemonize an arbitrary script in unix?

Now, /usr/local/bin/sendmsgd may look like:-

def main(args=None):
    while True:
        process_messages()
        time.sleep(10)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    import signal
    def signal_handler(signal, frame):
        sys.exit(0)
    signal.signal(signal.SIGINT, signal_handler)

    main(sys.argv)
2

I have some trouble understanding the documentation on Celery's website. I found this site. Which did a nice job explaining things. I got things working on a centos 6.2 system with django-1.5+Celery-3.0.17+sqlite3. The only trouble I had was an error finding the settings module I have to change it to "myprojectname.settings".

Step 1. Make the following script in /etc/default/celeryd . Note that you will need to change some of the contents depending on your system.

# Name of nodes to start, here we have a single node
CELERYD_NODES="w1"

# Where to chdir at start.
CELERYD_CHDIR="/var/www/some_folder/Myproject/"

# Python interpreter from environment, if using virtualenv
ENV_PYTHON="/somewhere/.virtualenvs/MyProject/bin/python"

# How to call "manage.py celeryd_multi"
CELERYD_MULTI="$ENV_PYTHON $CELERYD_CHDIR/manage.py celeryd_multi"

# How to call "manage.py celeryctl"
CELERYCTL="$ENV_PYTHON $CELERYD_CHDIR/manage.py celeryctl"

# Extra arguments to celeryd
CELERYD_OPTS="--time-limit=300 --concurrency=8"

# Name of the celery config module, don't change this.
CELERY_CONFIG_MODULE="celeryconfig"

# %n will be replaced with the nodename.
CELERYD_LOG_FILE="/var/log/celery/%n.log"
CELERYD_PID_FILE="/var/run/celery/%n.pid"

# Workers should run as an unprivileged user.
CELERYD_USER="celery"
CELERYD_GROUP="celery"

# Set any other env vars here too!
PROJET_ENV="PRODUCTION"

# Name of the projects settings module.
# in this case is just settings and not the full path because it will change the dir to
# the project folder first.
export DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE="settings"

Step 2. Make the script below in /etc/default/celeryd and change its permissions with

chmod +x /etc/init.d/celeryd 

This one does not need to be modified. Source

#!/bin/sh -e
# ============================================
#  celeryd - Starts the Celery worker daemon.
# ============================================
#
# :Usage: /etc/init.d/celeryd {start|stop|force-reload|restart|try-restart|status}
# :Configuration file: /etc/default/celeryd
#
# See http://docs.celeryq.org/en/latest/cookbook/daemonizing.html#init-script-celeryd


### BEGIN INIT INFO
# Provides:          celeryd
# Required-Start:    $network $local_fs $remote_fs
# Required-Stop:     $network $local_fs $remote_fs
# Default-Start:     2 3 4 5
# Default-Stop:      0 1 6
# Short-Description: celery task worker daemon
### END INIT INFO

#set -e

DEFAULT_PID_FILE="/var/run/celeryd@%n.pid"
DEFAULT_LOG_FILE="/var/log/celeryd@%n.log"
DEFAULT_LOG_LEVEL="INFO"
DEFAULT_NODES="celery"
DEFAULT_CELERYD="-m celery.bin.celeryd_detach"

# /etc/init.d/celeryd: start and stop the celery task worker daemon.

CELERY_DEFAULTS=${CELERY_DEFAULTS:-"/etc/default/celeryd"}

test -f "$CELERY_DEFAULTS" && . "$CELERY_DEFAULTS"
if [ -f "/etc/default/celeryd" ]; then
    . /etc/default/celeryd
fi

CELERYD_PID_FILE=${CELERYD_PID_FILE:-${CELERYD_PIDFILE:-$DEFAULT_PID_FILE}}
CELERYD_LOG_FILE=${CELERYD_LOG_FILE:-${CELERYD_LOGFILE:-$DEFAULT_LOG_FILE}}
CELERYD_LOG_LEVEL=${CELERYD_LOG_LEVEL:-${CELERYD_LOGLEVEL:-$DEFAULT_LOG_LEVEL}}
CELERYD_MULTI=${CELERYD_MULTI:-"celeryd-multi"}
CELERYD=${CELERYD:-$DEFAULT_CELERYD}
CELERYCTL=${CELERYCTL:="celeryctl"}
CELERYD_NODES=${CELERYD_NODES:-$DEFAULT_NODES}

export CELERY_LOADER

if [ -n "$2" ]; then
    CELERYD_OPTS="$CELERYD_OPTS $2"
fi

CELERYD_LOG_DIR=`dirname $CELERYD_LOG_FILE`
CELERYD_PID_DIR=`dirname $CELERYD_PID_FILE`
if [ ! -d "$CELERYD_LOG_DIR" ]; then
    mkdir -p $CELERYD_LOG_DIR
fi
if [ ! -d "$CELERYD_PID_DIR" ]; then
    mkdir -p $CELERYD_PID_DIR
fi

# Extra start-stop-daemon options, like user/group.
if [ -n "$CELERYD_USER" ]; then
    DAEMON_OPTS="$DAEMON_OPTS --uid=$CELERYD_USER"
    chown "$CELERYD_USER" $CELERYD_LOG_DIR $CELERYD_PID_DIR
fi
if [ -n "$CELERYD_GROUP" ]; then
    DAEMON_OPTS="$DAEMON_OPTS --gid=$CELERYD_GROUP"
    chgrp "$CELERYD_GROUP" $CELERYD_LOG_DIR $CELERYD_PID_DIR
fi

if [ -n "$CELERYD_CHDIR" ]; then
    DAEMON_OPTS="$DAEMON_OPTS --workdir=\"$CELERYD_CHDIR\""
fi


check_dev_null() {
    if [ ! -c /dev/null ]; then
        echo "/dev/null is not a character device!"
        exit 1
    fi
}


export PATH="${PATH:+$PATH:}/usr/sbin:/sbin"


stop_workers () {
    $CELERYD_MULTI stop $CELERYD_NODES --pidfile="$CELERYD_PID_FILE"
}


start_workers () {
    $CELERYD_MULTI start $CELERYD_NODES $DAEMON_OPTS        \
                         --pidfile="$CELERYD_PID_FILE"      \
                         --logfile="$CELERYD_LOG_FILE"      \
                         --loglevel="$CELERYD_LOG_LEVEL"    \
                         --cmd="$CELERYD"                   \
                         $CELERYD_OPTS
}


restart_workers () {
    $CELERYD_MULTI restart $CELERYD_NODES $DAEMON_OPTS      \
                           --pidfile="$CELERYD_PID_FILE"    \
                           --logfile="$CELERYD_LOG_FILE"    \
                           --loglevel="$CELERYD_LOG_LEVEL"  \
                           --cmd="$CELERYD"                 \
                           $CELERYD_OPTS
}



case "$1" in
    start)
        check_dev_null
        start_workers
    ;;

    stop)
        check_dev_null
        stop_workers
    ;;

    reload|force-reload)
        echo "Use restart"
    ;;

    status)
        $CELERYCTL status $CELERYCTL_OPTS
    ;;

    restart)
        check_dev_null
        restart_workers
    ;;

    try-restart)
        check_dev_null
        restart_workers
    ;;

    *)
        echo "Usage: /etc/init.d/celeryd {start|stop|restart|try-restart|kill}"
        exit 1
    ;;
esac

exit 0

Step 3. Use these command to start, stop, etc. the script.

# to start celeryd
/etc/init.d/celeryd start

# to stop
/etc/init.d/celeryd stop

# see the status
/etc/init.d/celeryd status

# print the log in the screen
cat /var/log/celery/w1.log  

If you have problems there were a bunch of comments and other recommendations on the site. Hopefully it stays up for a long time.

0

You could try using The Fat Controller which can take any script and daemonise it. It can also repeatedly run scripts with intervals specified in seconds, or even no interval at all so it will prevent there ever being two instances running at a time.

It's written entirely in C so it's very stable, designed to run for months or years on end - no matter how much your own scripts might crash. It's also very easy to get up and running.

It can also do a lot more things, such as parallel running of a script, even adjusting the number of parallel instances in accordance with the amount of work - but I guess that's out of scope for your requirement.

On the website there are plenty of use cases and detailed instructions. If you need any further help with it then just get in touch or file a support ticket and I'll get back to you as soon as I can.

The website is: http://fat-controller.sourceforge.net/

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