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Given this EXACT ad-hoc query:

DECLARE @list AS TABLE (Name VARCHAR(20))
INSERT INTO @list(Name)
VALUES ('Otter', 'Lebron', 'Aaron', 'Brock')

SELECT *
FROM Users
WHERE FirstName in (SELECT Name from @list)

How can this be done using C# ADO.NET with a SqlParameter?

5
  • 1
    Did you really need to make the table variable for the single value, or is this an over-simplification? In other words, why 2+ statements instead of 1? What would be the parameter? – p.campbell Nov 16 '11 at 21:11
  • The example was over simplified, edited to make more sense. – Dan Ling Nov 16 '11 at 21:21
  • What kind of parameter would this list be from the ADO.NET side, a DataTable or a string? – Icarus Nov 16 '11 at 21:28
  • Well I'm going to have the list represented as a string array... I can convert it to whatever type is necessary, I just don't know what that type should be. I tried both DataTable and List<SqlDataRecord> with no luck. – Dan Ling Nov 16 '11 at 21:34
  • 2
    Pose your question with your constraints UP FRONT. Don't allow people to compose answers for you, waste their time, and throw constraints at them. Very discourteous. – p.campbell Nov 16 '11 at 21:59
4

I'm using a modification of your orginal SQL for sample purposes.

DECLARE @list AS TABLE (Name VARCHAR(20));
INSERT INTO @list(Name)
VALUES ('PROCEDURE'), 
        ('FUNCTION');

SELECT *
FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
WHERE ROUTINE_TYPE in (SELECT Name from @list)

You can use a Table-Valued Parameter

Here's a modified example taken from Table-Valued Parameters in SQL Server 2008 (ADO.NET)

        using (SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection("Your connection string"))
        {

            var tableParam = new DataTable("names");
            tableParam.Columns.Add("Name", typeof(string));
            tableParam.Rows.Add(new object[] { "PROCEDURE" });
            tableParam.Rows.Add(new object[] { "FUNCTION')" });

            var sql = @"DECLARE @list AS TABLE (Name VARCHAR(20))
                       INSERT INTO @list(Name)
                       SELECT Name from @Names;

                       SELECT *
                       FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
                       WHERE ROUTINE_TYPE in (SELECT Name from @list)";

            var sqlCmd = new SqlCommand(sql, cnn);
            var tvpParam = sqlCmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Names", tableParam);
            tvpParam.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Structured;
            tvpParam.TypeName = "dbo.Names";

            cnn.Open();
            using(SqlDataReader rdr = sqlCmd.ExecuteReader() )
            {
                while (rdr.Read())
                    Console.WriteLine(rdr["SPECIFIC_NAME"]);                    

            }



        }

But you need to define the type dbo.Names before it can work

Here's the type creation SQL

CREATE TYPE dbo.Names AS TABLE 
( Name VARCHAR(Max));

Another option is to use an XML Parameter

 using (SqlConnection cnn = new SqlConnection("Your connection string"))
{



    var sql = @"DECLARE @list AS TABLE (Name VARCHAR(20))
                INSERT INTO @list(Name)
                SELECT t.name.value('.', 'varchar(MAX)')
                FROM   @Names.nodes('/Names/Name') as T(Name);

                SELECT *
                FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.ROUTINES
                WHERE ROUTINE_TYPE in (SELECT Name from @list)";

    var sqlCmd = new SqlCommand(sql, cnn);

    var s = new MemoryStream(ASCIIEncoding.Default.GetBytes("<Names><Name>PROCEDURE</Name><Name>FUNCTION</Name></Names>"));


    var xmlParam = new SqlXml(s);

    sqlCmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Names", xmlParam);


    cnn.Open();
    using(SqlDataReader rdr = sqlCmd.ExecuteReader() )
    {
        while (rdr.Read())
            Console.WriteLine(rdr["SPECIFIC_NAME"]);                    

    }



}
2
  • I am hoping to achieve this without creating a type because my DBA's are resisting this. – Dan Ling Nov 16 '11 at 21:51
  • 1
    <sigh> Don't know why your DBA would resist that. Its pretty low impact. I guess you other option is XML. updating the answer – Conrad Frix Nov 16 '11 at 21:56

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