10

Suppose I have a column called item code as below:

-----  ------
|row|  |code|
-----  ------
|1  |  |A123|
-----  ------
|2  |  |B123|
-----  ------
|...|  |....|
-----  ------
|n  |  |A123|
-----  ------

The value in the column of code may appear more then one time, how can I use Excel formula or any method in Excel to check the duplicated record in a column?

Thanks

11

Depending upon which version of Excel you are using, you may be able to achieve this with Conditional Formatting.

Excel 2007 has quick 3 click setup, for conditional formatting duplicates.

Update to include instructions from xQbert below:

Quick formatting

  • Select one or more cells in a range, table, or PivotTable report.
  • On the Home tab, in the Style group, click the arrow next to Conditional Formatting, and then click Highlight Cells Rules.
  • Select Duplicate Values. Enter the values that you want to use, and then select a format.
  • 2
    Quick formatting Select one or more cells in a range, table, or PivotTable report. On the Home tab, in the Style group, click the arrow next to Conditional Formatting, and then click Highlight Cells Rules. Select Duplicate Values. Enter the values that you want to use, and then select a format. – xQbert Nov 17 '11 at 2:31
  • I am using Excel 2010, so could you please suggest the step? – Charles Yeung Nov 17 '11 at 3:10
  • @CharlesYeung: refer to the comment by xQbert, for an excellent step-by-step. – Craig T Nov 17 '11 at 3:27
  • All I did was steal from MSFT help file :D – xQbert Nov 17 '11 at 18:41
  • @xQbert Thanks for those instructions. I think the original answer should be edited to include them. – vapcguy Jul 13 '15 at 18:27
8

In a column next to the code, use a formula like the one below (eg. putting this in C2 if your codes are in Column B):

=IF(COUNTIF(B:B,B2)>1,"Duplicated!","")

Fill down as required.

  • In between B:B and B2 i had to use a ; instead of a ,. It probably has to do with excell version? – JoaoFilipeClementeMartins Apr 17 '17 at 10:22
  • 1
    That's a region-specific thing. Comma in the US but semicolon in Europe for example. – Tim Williams Apr 17 '17 at 10:37
3

Another common way to do this is simply sort the column then add the formula like the following to the column next to it and fill down...

=IF(B2=B1,1,0)

Or use a pivot table to get distinct code values... double click on the summary pivot row count to see what "Rows" make up the count.

enter image description here

  • @pmav99 This would just allow you to compare the 2nd entry to the 1st, and then 3rd to the 2nd, 4th to the 3rd, etc. If #4 was the same as #1, it would not catch that. Bad answer. – vapcguy Jul 13 '15 at 18:22
  • @vapcguy... yes it would. here's the attached.... you just have to start the formula offset by 1 row. The first row can't check against a previous. you can then filter to exclude 1's and copy the result set out guaranteed not to have duplicates.. Another method would be to simply pivot the data and double click on results to see rows that are dups – xQbert Jul 13 '15 at 19:31
  • @xQbert My point is that this requires the data to be sorted, so that if the 2nd one is checked, it will compare against the 1st, find itself, and give you a "1". If you have data that is NOT sorted, this approach doesn't work at all. You can't always assume that the data can be sorted such that duplicates will be right behind/in front of the other. I know someone can go in Excel and do the sort, but there may be instances where this doesn't work for the situation. Ex., I needed to display duplicate file names, but leave the data as I had retrieved it from its source. I used Craig T's answer. – vapcguy Jul 14 '15 at 21:16
  • Understood, But data can ALWAYS be sorted, then sorted back to original sequence by adding a rownum, sorting by code, applying the formula, copy pasting as VALUE over the formulas, then sort by row number so it's back to it's original format with formula results retained My point here is that there is always more than one way to achieve the results and each has it's own merit. To say this is a "BAD answer" When it works is imo incorrect. Especially when the question states: "any method in Excel to check the duplicated record in a column" But I leave it at that no additional comments made – xQbert Jul 14 '15 at 22:21
  • @xQbert, NO, data CANNOT always be sorted, since there are times when you must leave the data intact, unmolested, and in place. I ran across that kind of use case when I ran across this answer. If I sorted my data, I would have lost the ordering that it had been originally entered in, and could not have been sorted back because the data did not originally have a sequence except the order in which it had been entered, with no "last modified date" or ID to help me. I'm sure there are plenty of other scenarios. A good answer takes all scenarios into account, not just you're own use case. – vapcguy Jul 29 '15 at 16:56

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