620

I have a data frame and some columns have NA values.

How do I replace these NA values with zeroes?

17 Answers 17

760

See my comment in @gsk3 answer. A simple example:

> m <- matrix(sample(c(NA, 1:10), 100, replace = TRUE), 10)
> d <- as.data.frame(m)
   V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 V9 V10
1   4  3 NA  3  7  6  6 10  6   5
2   9  8  9  5 10 NA  2  1  7   2
3   1  1  6  3  6 NA  1  4  1   6
4  NA  4 NA  7 10  2 NA  4  1   8
5   1  2  4 NA  2  6  2  6  7   4
6  NA  3 NA NA 10  2  1 10  8   4
7   4  4  9 10  9  8  9  4 10  NA
8   5  8  3  2  1  4  5  9  4   7
9   3  9 10  1  9  9 10  5  3   3
10  4  2  2  5 NA  9  7  2  5   5

> d[is.na(d)] <- 0

> d
   V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 V9 V10
1   4  3  0  3  7  6  6 10  6   5
2   9  8  9  5 10  0  2  1  7   2
3   1  1  6  3  6  0  1  4  1   6
4   0  4  0  7 10  2  0  4  1   8
5   1  2  4  0  2  6  2  6  7   4
6   0  3  0  0 10  2  1 10  8   4
7   4  4  9 10  9  8  9  4 10   0
8   5  8  3  2  1  4  5  9  4   7
9   3  9 10  1  9  9 10  5  3   3
10  4  2  2  5  0  9  7  2  5   5

There's no need to apply apply. =)

EDIT

You should also take a look at norm package. It has a lot of nice features for missing data analysis. =)

  • 2
    I already tried this code yesterday before you post it and not worked. Because this I posted the question. But I tried know and worked perfectly. I think I was doing something wrong. – Renato Dinhani Nov 17 '11 at 14:08
  • 12
    @RenatoDinhaniConceição: if you tried something already, it's helpful to share that information when you ask the question; it helps to narrow down where the problem may be. – Aaron Nov 17 '11 at 19:33
  • 2
    d[is.na(d)] <- 0 does not make sense to me. It seems backwards? How does R process this statement? – user798719 Apr 4 '15 at 11:03
  • 13
    @user798719 - "<-" is R's assignment operator, and can be read as: do something on the right hand side and then assign it to the location/name on the left. In this case, we aren't really "doing" anything - just making zeroes. The left side is saying: look at the d object, inside the d object (the square brackets), find all the elements that return TRUE (is.na(d) returns a logical for each element). Once they are found, replace them ("assign them") with the value 0. These leaves all of the non-NAs as they were, and only replaces the ones with missingness. – Twitch_City Jul 29 '15 at 16:14
  • 2
    And... if you have a data frame and only want to apply the replacement to specific nurmeric vectors (leaving say... strings with NA): df[19:28][is.na(df[19:28])] <- 0 – jtdoud Feb 9 '17 at 18:03
222

The dplyr hybridized options are now around 30% faster than the Base R subset reassigns. On a 100M datapoint dataframe mutate_all(~replace(., is.na(.), 0)) runs a half a second faster than the base R d[is.na(d)] <- 0 option. What one wants to avoid specifically is using an ifelse() or an if_else(). (The complete 600 trial analysis ran to over 4.5 hours mostly due to including these approaches.) Please see benchmark analyses below for the complete results.

If you are struggling with massive dataframes, data.table is the fastest option of all: 40% faster than the standard Base R approach. It also modifies the data in place, effectively allowing you to work with nearly twice as much of the data at once.


A clustering of other helpful tidyverse replacement approaches

Locationally:

  • index mutate_at(c(5:10), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0))
  • direct reference mutate_at(vars(var5:var10), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0))
  • fixed match mutate_at(vars(contains("1")), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0))
    • or in place of contains(), try ends_with(),starts_with()
  • pattern match mutate_at(vars(matches("\\d{2}")), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0))

Conditionally:
(change just numeric (columns) and leave string (columns) alone.)

  • integers mutate_if(is.integer, ~replace(., is.na(.), 0))
  • doubles mutate_if(is.numeric, ~replace(., is.na(.), 0))
  • strings mutate_if(is.character, ~replace(., is.na(.), 0))

The Complete Analysis -

Updated for dplyr 0.8.0: functions use purrr format ~ symbols: replacing deprecated funs() arguments.

Approaches tested:

# Base R: 
baseR.sbst.rssgn   <- function(x) { x[is.na(x)] <- 0; x }
baseR.replace      <- function(x) { replace(x, is.na(x), 0) }
baseR.for          <- function(x) { for(j in 1:ncol(x))
    x[[j]][is.na(x[[j]])] = 0 }

# tidyverse
## dplyr
dplyr_if_else      <- function(x) { mutate_all(x, ~if_else(is.na(.), 0, .)) }
dplyr_coalesce     <- function(x) { mutate_all(x, ~coalesce(., 0)) }

## tidyr
tidyr_replace_na   <- function(x) { replace_na(x, as.list(setNames(rep(0, 10), as.list(c(paste0("var", 1:10)))))) }

## hybrid 
hybrd.ifelse     <- function(x) { mutate_all(x, ~ifelse(is.na(.), 0, .)) }
hybrd.replace_na <- function(x) { mutate_all(x, ~replace_na(., 0)) }
hybrd.replace    <- function(x) { mutate_all(x, ~replace(., is.na(.), 0)) }
hybrd.rplc_at.idx<- function(x) { mutate_at(x, c(1:10), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0)) }
hybrd.rplc_at.nse<- function(x) { mutate_at(x, vars(var1:var10), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0)) }
hybrd.rplc_at.stw<- function(x) { mutate_at(x, vars(starts_with("var")), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0)) }
hybrd.rplc_at.ctn<- function(x) { mutate_at(x, vars(contains("var")), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0)) }
hybrd.rplc_at.mtc<- function(x) { mutate_at(x, vars(matches("\\d+")), ~replace(., is.na(.), 0)) }
hybrd.rplc_if    <- function(x) { mutate_if(x, is.numeric, ~replace(., is.na(.), 0)) }

# data.table   
library(data.table)
DT.for.set.nms   <- function(x) { for (j in names(x))
    set(x,which(is.na(x[[j]])),j,0) }
DT.for.set.sqln  <- function(x) { for (j in seq_len(ncol(x)))
    set(x,which(is.na(x[[j]])),j,0) }
DT.fnafill       <- function(x) { fnafill(df, fill=0)}
DT.setnafill     <- function(x) { setnafill(df, fill=0)}

The code for this analysis:

library(microbenchmark)
# 20% NA filled dataframe of 10 Million rows and 10 columns
set.seed(42) # to recreate the exact dataframe
dfN <- as.data.frame(matrix(sample(c(NA, as.numeric(1:4)), 1e7*10, replace = TRUE),
                            dimnames = list(NULL, paste0("var", 1:10)), 
                            ncol = 10))
# Running 600 trials with each replacement method 
# (the functions are excecuted locally - so that the original dataframe remains unmodified in all cases)
perf_results <- microbenchmark(
    hybrid.ifelse    = hybrid.ifelse(copy(dfN)),
    dplyr_if_else    = dplyr_if_else(copy(dfN)),
    hybrd.replace_na = hybrd.replace_na(copy(dfN)),
    baseR.sbst.rssgn = baseR.sbst.rssgn(copy(dfN)),
    baseR.replace    = baseR.replace(copy(dfN)),
    dplyr_coalesce   = dplyr_coalesce(copy(dfN)),
    tidyr_replace_na = tidyr_replace_na(copy(dfN)),
    hybrd.replace    = hybrd.replace(copy(dfN)),
    hybrd.rplc_at.ctn= hybrd.rplc_at.ctn(copy(dfN)),
    hybrd.rplc_at.nse= hybrd.rplc_at.nse(copy(dfN)),
    baseR.for        = baseR.for(copy(dfN)),
    hybrd.rplc_at.idx= hybrd.rplc_at.idx(copy(dfN)),
    DT.for.set.nms   = DT.for.set.nms(copy(dfN)),
    DT.for.set.sqln  = DT.for.set.sqln(copy(dfN)),
    times = 600L
)

Summary of Results

> print(perf_results)
Unit: milliseconds
              expr       min        lq     mean   median       uq      max neval
      hybrd.ifelse 6171.0439 6339.7046 6425.221 6407.397 6496.992 7052.851   600
     dplyr_if_else 3737.4954 3877.0983 3953.857 3946.024 4023.301 4539.428   600
  hybrd.replace_na 1497.8653 1706.1119 1748.464 1745.282 1789.804 2127.166   600
  baseR.sbst.rssgn 1480.5098 1686.1581 1730.006 1728.477 1772.951 2010.215   600
     baseR.replace 1457.4016 1681.5583 1725.481 1722.069 1766.916 2089.627   600
    dplyr_coalesce 1227.6150 1483.3520 1524.245 1519.454 1561.488 1996.859   600
  tidyr_replace_na 1248.3292 1473.1707 1521.889 1520.108 1570.382 1995.768   600
     hybrd.replace  913.1865 1197.3133 1233.336 1238.747 1276.141 1438.646   600
 hybrd.rplc_at.ctn  916.9339 1192.9885 1224.733 1227.628 1268.644 1466.085   600
 hybrd.rplc_at.nse  919.0270 1191.0541 1228.749 1228.635 1275.103 2882.040   600
         baseR.for  869.3169 1180.8311 1216.958 1224.407 1264.737 1459.726   600
 hybrd.rplc_at.idx  839.8915 1189.7465 1223.326 1228.329 1266.375 1565.794   600
    DT.for.set.nms  761.6086  915.8166 1015.457 1001.772 1106.315 1363.044   600
   DT.for.set.sqln  787.3535  918.8733 1017.812 1002.042 1122.474 1321.860   600

Boxplot of Results

ggplot(perf_results, aes(x=expr, y=time/10^9)) +
    geom_boxplot() +
    xlab('Expression') +
    ylab('Elapsed Time (Seconds)') +
    scale_y_continuous(breaks = seq(0,7,1)) +
    coord_flip()

Boxplot Comparison of Elapsed Time

Color-coded Scatterplot of Trials (with y-axis on a log scale)

qplot(y=time/10^9, data=perf_results, colour=expr) + 
    labs(y = "log10 Scaled Elapsed Time per Trial (secs)", x = "Trial Number") +
    coord_cartesian(ylim = c(0.75, 7.5)) +
    scale_y_log10(breaks=c(0.75, 0.875, 1, 1.25, 1.5, 1.75, seq(2, 7.5)))

Scatterplot of All Trial Times

A note on the other high performers

When the datasets get larger, Tidyr''s replace_na had historically pulled out in front. With the current collection of 50M data points to run through, it performs almost exactly as well as a Base R For Loop. I am curious to see what happens for different sized dataframes.

Additional examples for the mutate and summarize _at and _all function variants can be found here: https://rdrr.io/cran/dplyr/man/summarise_all.html Additionally, I found helpful demonstrations and collections of examples here: https://blog.exploratory.io/dplyr-0-5-is-awesome-heres-why-be095fd4eb8a

Attributions and Appreciations

With special thanks to:

  • Tyler Rinker and Akrun for demonstrating microbenchmark.
  • alexis_laz for working on helping me understand the use of local(), and (with Frank's patient help, too) the role that silent coercion plays in speeding up many of these approaches.
  • ArthurYip for the poke to add the newer coalesce() function in and update the analysis.
  • Gregor for the nudge to figure out the data.table functions well enough to finally include them in the lineup.
  • Base R For loop: alexis_laz
  • data.table For Loops: Matt_Dowle

(Of course, please reach over and give them upvotes, too if you find those approaches useful.)

Note on my use of Numerics: If you do have a pure integer dataset, all of your functions will run faster. Please see alexiz_laz's work for more information. IRL, I can't recall encountering a data set containing more than 10-15% integers, so I am running these tests on fully numeric dataframes.

Hardware Used 3.9 GHz CPU with 24 GB RAM

  • 2
    @Frank - Thank you for finding that discrepancy. The references are all cleaned up and the results have been entirely rerun on a single machine and reposted. – leerssej Mar 7 '17 at 17:46
  • Ok thanks. Also, I think df1[j][is.na(df1[j])] = 0 is wrong, should be df1[[j]][is.na(df1[[j]])] = 0 – Frank Mar 7 '17 at 18:19
  • Oh now I see you've written it twice, differently in each benchmark. Anyway, forLp_Sbst doesn't seem like a way anyone should consider approaching it vs forLp_smplfSbst – Frank Mar 7 '17 at 18:23
  • 1
    @UweBlock - great question: it allowed me to do the subsetting left assign operation with all functions working on exactly the same dataframe. Since I had to wrap the local around that function, then in the name of science [One job, you had one job!] I wrapped it around all of them so that the playing field was unequivocally level. For more info - please see here: stackoverflow.com/questions/41604711/… I had trimmed down the rather longwinded previous answer - but that part of the discussion would be good to add back in. Thank you! – leerssej Apr 23 '17 at 21:08
  • 1
    @ArthurYip - I've added the coalesce() option in and rerun all the times. Thank you for the nudge to update. – leerssej Jul 10 '17 at 18:58
112

For a single vector:

x <- c(1,2,NA,4,5)
x[is.na(x)] <- 0

For a data.frame, make a function out of the above, then apply it to the columns.

Please provide a reproducible example next time as detailed here:

How to make a great R reproducible example?

  • 16
    is.na is generic function, and has methods for objects of data.frame class. so this one will also work on data.frames! – aL3xa Nov 17 '11 at 11:44
  • 3
    When I ran methods(is.na) for the first time, I was like whaaa?!?. I love when stuff like that happen! =) – aL3xa Nov 17 '11 at 16:15
  • 9
    Suppose you have a data frame named df instead of a single vector and you just want to replace missing observations in a single column named X3. You can do so with this line: df$X3[is.na(df$X3)] <- 0 – Mark Miller Feb 22 '13 at 1:25
  • 8
    Suppose you only want to replace NA with 0 in columns 4-6 of a data frame named my.df. You can use: my.df[,4:6][is.na(my.df[,4:6])] <- 0 – Mark Miller Mar 20 '13 at 2:27
  • how come you pass 'x' to is.na(x) is there a way to tell which library routines in R are vectorized? – big_mike_boiii Apr 7 '16 at 19:44
68

dplyr example:

library(dplyr)

df1 <- df1 %>%
    mutate(myCol1 = if_else(is.na(myCol1), 0, myCol1))

Note: This works per selected column, if we need to do this for all column, see @reidjax's answer using mutate_each.

50

If we are trying to replace NAs when exporting, for example when writing to csv, then we can use:

  write.csv(data, "data.csv", na = "0")
44

I know the question is already answered, but doing it this way might be more useful to some:

Define this function:

na.zero <- function (x) {
    x[is.na(x)] <- 0
    return(x)
}

Now whenever you need to convert NA's in a vector to zero's you can do:

na.zero(some.vector)
20

With dplyr 0.5.0, you can use coalesce function which can be easily integrated into %>% pipeline by doing coalesce(vec, 0). This replaces all NAs in vec with 0:

Say we have a data frame with NAs:

library(dplyr)
df <- data.frame(v = c(1, 2, 3, NA, 5, 6, 8))

df
#    v
# 1  1
# 2  2
# 3  3
# 4 NA
# 5  5
# 6  6
# 7  8

df %>% mutate(v = coalesce(v, 0))
#   v
# 1 1
# 2 2
# 3 3
# 4 0
# 5 5
# 6 6
# 7 8
  • I tested coalesce and it performs about the same as replace. the coalesce command is the simplest so far! – Arthur Yip Jul 4 '17 at 15:37
  • it would be useful if you would present how to apply that on all columns of 2+ columns tibble. – jangorecki May 30 at 15:18
20

More general approach of using replace() in matrix or vector to replace NA to 0

For example:

> x <- c(1,2,NA,NA,1,1)
> x1 <- replace(x,is.na(x),0)
> x1
[1] 1 2 0 0 1 1

This is also an alternative to using ifelse() in dplyr

df = data.frame(col = c(1,2,NA,NA,1,1))
df <- df %>%
   mutate(col = replace(col,is.na(col),0))
  • 1
    My column was a factor so I had to add my replacement value levels(A$x) <- append(levels(A$x), "notAnswered") A$x <- replace(A$x,which(is.na(A$x)),"notAnswered") – Climbs_lika_Spyder Jun 23 '16 at 15:20
  • 1
    which isn't needed here, you can use x1 <- replace(x,is.na(x),1). – lmo Jan 18 '17 at 15:03
  • I tried many ways proposed in this thread to replace NA to 0 in just one specific column in a large data frame and this function replace() worked the most effectively while also the most simply. – Duc May 17 '17 at 12:26
8

Another example using imputeTS package:

library(imputeTS)
na.replace(yourDataframe, 0)
8

If you want to replace NAs in factor variables, this might be useful:

n <- length(levels(data.vector))+1

data.vector <- as.numeric(data.vector)
data.vector[is.na(data.vector)] <- n
data.vector <- as.factor(data.vector)
levels(data.vector) <- c("level1","level2",...,"leveln", "NAlevel") 

It transforms a factor-vector into a numeric vector and adds another artifical numeric factor level, which is then transformed back to a factor-vector with one extra "NA-level" of your choice.

7

Would've commented on @ianmunoz's post but I don't have enough reputation. You can combine dplyr's mutate_each and replace to take care of the NA to 0 replacement. Using the dataframe from @aL3xa's answer...

> m <- matrix(sample(c(NA, 1:10), 100, replace = TRUE), 10)
> d <- as.data.frame(m)
> d

    V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 V9 V10
1   4  8  1  9  6  9 NA  8  9   8
2   8  3  6  8  2  1 NA NA  6   3
3   6  6  3 NA  2 NA NA  5  7   7
4  10  6  1  1  7  9  1 10  3  10
5  10  6  7 10 10  3  2  5  4   6
6   2  4  1  5  7 NA NA  8  4   4
7   7  2  3  1  4 10 NA  8  7   7
8   9  5  8 10  5  3  5  8  3   2
9   9  1  8  7  6  5 NA NA  6   7
10  6 10  8  7  1  1  2  2  5   7

> d %>% mutate_each( funs_( interp( ~replace(., is.na(.),0) ) ) )

    V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 V9 V10
1   4  8  1  9  6  9  0  8  9   8
2   8  3  6  8  2  1  0  0  6   3
3   6  6  3  0  2  0  0  5  7   7
4  10  6  1  1  7  9  1 10  3  10
5  10  6  7 10 10  3  2  5  4   6
6   2  4  1  5  7  0  0  8  4   4
7   7  2  3  1  4 10  0  8  7   7
8   9  5  8 10  5  3  5  8  3   2
9   9  1  8  7  6  5  0  0  6   7
10  6 10  8  7  1  1  2  2  5   7

We're using standard evaluation (SE) here which is why we need the underscore on "funs_." We also use lazyeval's interp/~ and the . references "everything we are working with", i.e. the data frame. Now there are zeros!

7

It is also possible to use tidyr::replace_na.

    library(tidyr)
    df <- df %>% mutate_all(funs(replace_na(.,0)))
4

You can use replace()

For example:

> x <- c(-1,0,1,0,NA,0,1,1)
> x1 <- replace(x,5,1)
> x1
[1] -1  0  1  0  1  0  1  1

> x1 <- replace(x,5,mean(x,na.rm=T))
> x1
[1] -1.00  0.00  1.00  0.00  0.29  0.00 1.00  1.00
  • 6
    True, but only practical when you know the index of NAs in your vector. It's fine for small vectors as in your example. – dardisco Apr 8 '13 at 1:43
  • 3
    @dardisco x1 <- replace(x,is.na(x),1) will work without explicitly listing the index values. – lmo Jan 18 '17 at 15:01
4

Another dplyr pipe compatible option with tidyrmethod replace_na that works for several columns:

require(dplyr)
require(tidyr)

m <- matrix(sample(c(NA, 1:10), 100, replace = TRUE), 10)
d <- as.data.frame(m)

myList <- setNames(lapply(vector("list", ncol(d)), function(x) x <- 0), names(d))

df <- d %>% replace_na(myList)

You can easily restrict to e.g. numeric columns:

d$str <- c("string", NA)

myList <- myList[sapply(d, is.numeric)]

df <- d %>% replace_na(myList)
3

This simple function extracted from Datacamp could help:

replace_missings <- function(x, replacement) {
  is_miss <- is.na(x)
  x[is_miss] <- replacement

  message(sum(is_miss), " missings replaced by the value ", replacement)
  x
}

Then

replace_missings(df, replacement = 0)
3

Dedicated function (nafill / setnafill) for that purpose is in recent data.table version

install.packages("data.table", repos="https://Rdatatable.gitlab.io/data.table")
library(data.table)
ans_df = nafill(df, fill=0)
setnafill(df, fill=0) # this one updates in-place
0

An easy way to write it is with if_na from hablar:

library(dplyr)
library(hablar)

df <- tibble(a = c(1, 2, 3, NA, 5, 6, 8))

df %>% 
  mutate(a = if_na(a, 0))

which returns:

      a
  <dbl>
1     1
2     2
3     3
4     0
5     5
6     6
7     8

protected by Vamsi Prabhala Jul 29 '16 at 23:42

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