231

Like many people these days I've been trying the different features that C+11 brings. One of my favorites is the "range-based for loops".

I understand that:

for(Type& v : a) { ... }

Is equivalent to:

for(auto iv = begin(a); iv != end(a); ++iv)
{
  Type& v = *iv;
  ...
}

And that begin() simply returns a.begin() for standard containers.

But what if I want to make my custom type "range-based for loop"-aware ?

Should I just specialize begin() and end() ?

If my custom type belongs to the namespace xml, should I define xml::begin() or std::begin() ?

In short, what are the guidelines to do that ?

  • It is possible either by defining a member begin/end or a friend, static or free begin/end. Just be careful in which namespace you put the free function: stackoverflow.com/questions/28242073/… – alfC Mar 30 '16 at 21:06
  • Could anyone please post an answer with the example of a float value range which is NOT a container: for( auto x : range<float>(0,TWO_PI, 0.1F) ) { ... }. I am curious how you work around the fact that `´operator!=()`` is hard to define. And what about the dereferencing (*__begin) in this case? I think it would be a great contribution if someone showed us how that is done! – BitTickler Oct 13 '18 at 23:57
165

The standard has been changed since the question (and most answers) were posted in the resolution of this defect report.

The way to make a for(:) loop work on your type X is now one of two ways:

  • Create member X::begin() and X::end() that return something that acts like an iterator

  • Create a free function begin(X&) and end(X&) that return something that acts like an iterator, in the same namespace as your type X

And similar for const variations. This will work both on compilers that implement the defect report changes, and compilers that do not.

The objects returned do not have to actually be iterators. The for(:) loop, unlike most parts of the C++ standard, is specified to expand to something equivalent to:

for( range_declaration : range_expression )

becomes:

{
  auto && __range = range_expression ;
  for (auto __begin = begin_expr,
            __end = end_expr;
            __begin != __end; ++__begin) {
    range_declaration = *__begin;
    loop_statement
  }
}

where the variables beginning with __ are for exposition only, and begin_expr and end_expr is the magic that calls begin/end

The requirements on the begin/end return value are simple: You must overload pre-++, ensure the initialization expressions are valid, binary != that can be used in a boolean context, unary * that returns something you can assign-initialize range_declaration with, and expose a public destructor.

Doing so in a way that isn't compatible with an iterator is probably a bad idea, as future iterations of C++ might be relatively cavalier about breaking your code if you do.

As an aside, it is reasonably likely that a future revision of the standard will permit end_expr to return a different type than begin_expr. This is useful in that it permits "lazy-end" evaluation (like detecting null-termination) that is easy to optimize to be as efficient as a hand-written C loop, and other similar advantages.


¹ Note that for(:) loops store any temporary in an auto&& variable, and pass it to you as an lvalue. You cannot detect if you are iterating over a temporary (or other rvalue); such an overload will not be called by a for(:) loop. See [stmt.ranged] 1.2-1.3 from n4527.

² Either call the begin/end method, or ADL-only lookup of free function begin/end, or magic for C-style array support. Note that std::begin is not called unless range_expression returns an object of type in namespace std or dependent on same.


In the range-for expression has been updated

{
  auto && __range = range_expression ;
  auto __begin = begin_expr;
  auto __end = end_expr;
  for (;__begin != __end; ++__begin) {
    range_declaration = *__begin;
    loop_statement
  }
}

with the types of __begin and __end have been decoupled.

This permits the end iterator to not be the same type as begin. Your end iterator type can be a "sentinel" which only supports != with the begin iterator type.

A practical example of why this is useful is that your end iterator can read "check your char* to see if it points to '0'" when == with a char*. This allows a C++ range-for expression to generate optimal code when iterating over a null-terminated char* buffer.

struct null_sentinal_t {
  template<class Rhs,
    std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<Rhs, null_sentinal_t>{},int> =0
  >
  friend bool operator==(Rhs const& ptr, null_sentinal_t) {
    return !*ptr;
  }
  template<class Rhs,
    std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<Rhs, null_sentinal_t>{},int> =0
  >
  friend bool operator!=(Rhs const& ptr, null_sentinal_t) {
    return !(ptr==null_sentinal_t{});
  }
  template<class Lhs,
    std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<Lhs, null_sentinal_t>{},int> =0
  >
  friend bool operator==(null_sentinal_t, Lhs const& ptr) {
    return !*ptr;
  }
  template<class Lhs,
    std::enable_if_t<!std::is_same<Lhs, null_sentinal_t>{},int> =0
  >
  friend bool operator!=(null_sentinal_t, Lhs const& ptr) {
    return !(null_sentinal_t{}==ptr);
  }
  friend bool operator==(null_sentinal_t, null_sentinal_t) {
    return true;
  }
  friend bool operator!=(null_sentinal_t, null_sentinal_t) {
    return false;
  }
};

live example in a compiler without full C++17 support; for loop manually expanded.

  • If range-based for uses a different lookup mechanism, then maybe it's possible to arrange that range-based for gets a different pair of begin and end functions than is available in normal code. Perhaps they could then be very specialized to behave differently (i.e. faster by ignoring the end argument to get the maximize optimizations possible.) But I'm not good enough with namespaces to be sure how to do this. – Aaron McDaid Aug 20 '15 at 23:11
  • @AaronMcDaid not very practical. You'd easily end up with surprising results, because some means of calling begin/end would end up with the range-based for begin/end, and others would not. Innocuous changes (from the client side) would get behavior changes. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Aug 21 '15 at 0:52
  • 1
    You don't need begin(X&&). The temporary is suspended in midair by auto&& in a range-based for, and begin is always called with an lvalue (__range). – T.C. Nov 2 '15 at 18:12
  • 1
    This answer would really benefit from a template example that one can copy and implement. – Tomáš Zato - Reinstate Monica Aug 26 at 11:48
52

The relevant part of the standard is 6.5.4/1:

if _RangeT is a class type, the unqualified-ids begin and end are looked up in the scope of class _RangeT as if by class member access lookup (3.4.5), and if either (or both) finds at least one declaration, begin- expr and end-expr are __range.begin() and __range.end(), respectively;

— otherwise, begin-expr and end-expr are begin(__range) and end(__range), respectively, where begin and end are looked up with argument-dependent lookup (3.4.2). For the purposes of this name lookup, namespace std is an associated namespace.

So, you can do any of the following:

  • define begin and end member functions
  • define begin and end free functions that will be found by ADL (simplified version: put them in the same namespace as the class)
  • specialize std::begin and std::end

std::begin calls the begin() member function anyway, so if you only implement one of the above, then the results should be the same no matter which one you choose. That's the same results for ranged-based for loops, and also the same result for mere mortal code that doesn't have its own magical name resolution rules so just does using std::begin; followed by an unqualified call to begin(a).

If you implement the member functions and the ADL functions, though, then range-based for loops should call the member functions, whereas mere mortals will call the ADL functions. Best make sure they do the same thing in that case!

If the thing you're writing implements the container interface, then it will have begin() and end() member functions already, which should be sufficient. If it's a range that isn't a container (which would be a good idea if it's immutable or if you don't know the size up front), you're free to choose.

Of the options you lay out, note that you must not overload std::begin(). You are permitted to specialize standard templates for a user-defined type, but aside from that, adding definitions to namespace std is undefined behavior. But anyway, specializing standard functions is a poor choice if only because the lack of partial function specialization means you can only do it for a single class, not for a class template.

  • Aren't there certain requirements that the iterator much meet? ie be a ForwardIterator or something along those lines. – Pubby Dec 17 '12 at 7:44
  • 2
    @Pubby: Looking at 6.5.4, I think InputIterator is sufficient. But actually I don't think the type returned has to be an iterator at all for range-based for. The statement is defined in the standard by what it's equivalent to, so it's enough to implement only the expressions used in the code in the standard: operators !=, prefix ++ and unary *. It's probably unwise to implement begin() and end() member functions or non-member ADL functions that return anything other than an iterator, but I think it's legal. Specializing std::begin to return a non-iterator is UB, I think. – Steve Jessop Dec 17 '12 at 12:01
  • Are you sure that you must not overload std::begin? I ask because the standard library does so in a few cases itself. – ThreeBit Apr 1 '13 at 22:18
  • @ThreeBit: yes, I'm sure. The rules for standard library implementations are different from the rules for programs. – Steve Jessop Apr 1 '13 at 23:13
  • 3
    This needs to be updated for open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html#1442. – T.C. Jul 16 '15 at 5:46
45

I write my answer because some people might be more happy with simple real life example without STL includes.

I have my own plain only data array implementation for some reason, and I wanted to use the range based for loop. Here is my solution:

 template <typename DataType>
 class PodArray {
 public:
   class iterator {
   public:
     iterator(DataType * ptr): ptr(ptr){}
     iterator operator++() { ++ptr; return *this; }
     bool operator!=(const iterator & other) const { return ptr != other.ptr; }
     const DataType& operator*() const { return *ptr; }
   private:
     DataType* ptr;
   };
 private:
   unsigned len;
   DataType *val;
 public:
   iterator begin() const { return iterator(val); }
   iterator end() const { return iterator(val + len); }

   // rest of the container definition not related to the question ...
 };

Then the usage example:

PodArray<char> array;
// fill up array in some way
for(auto& c : array)
  printf("char: %c\n", c);
  • 2
    The example has the begin() and end() methods, and also have a basic (easy to understand) example iterator class that can easily be adjusted for any custom container type. Comparing std::array<> and any possible alternate implementation is a different question, and in my opinion has nothing to do with the range-based for loop. – csjpeter Mar 9 '15 at 6:26
33

Should I just specialize begin() and end() ?

As far as I know, that is enough. You also have to make sure that incrementing the pointer would get from the begin to the end.

Next example (it is missing const version of begin and end) compiles and works fine.

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

int i=0;

struct A
{
    A()
    {
        std::generate(&v[0], &v[10], [&i](){  return ++i;} );
    }
    int * begin()
    {
        return &v[0];
    }
    int * end()
    {
        return &v[10];
    }

    int v[10];
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    for( auto it : a )
    {
        std::cout << it << std::endl;
    }
}

Here is another example with begin/end as functions. They have to be in the same namespace as the class, because of ADL :

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>


namespace foo{
int i=0;

struct A
{
    A()
    {
        std::generate(&v[0], &v[10], [&i](){  return ++i;} );
    }

    int v[10];
};

int *begin( A &v )
{
    return &v.v[0];
}
int *end( A &v )
{
    return &v.v[10];
}
} // namespace foo

int main()
{
    foo::A a;
    for( auto it : a )
    {
        std::cout << it << std::endl;
    }
}
  • 1
    @ereOn In the same namespace where the class is defined. See the 2nd example – BЈовић Nov 17 '11 at 9:43
  • 2
    Congratulations as well :) It might be worth mentionning the terms Argument Dependent Lookup (ADL) or Koenig Lookup for the second example (to explain why the free function should be in the same namespace as the class it operates on). – Matthieu M. Nov 17 '11 at 10:11
  • 1
    @ereOn: actually, you don't. ADL is about extending the scopes to look-up to automatically include the namespaces that the arguments belong to. There is a good ACCU article about overload resolution, which unfortunately skips the name lookup part. The name lookup involves collecting candidates function, you start by looking in the current scope + the scopes of the arguments. If no name is found that match, you move up to the parent scope of the current scope and search again... until you reach the global scope. – Matthieu M. Nov 17 '11 at 10:23
  • 1
    @BЈовић sorry, but for which reason in the end() function do you return a dangerous pointer? I know it works, but I want to understand the logic of this. The end of the array is v[9], why would you ever return v[10]? – gedamial Jun 26 '16 at 19:57
  • 1
    @gedamial I agree. I think it should be return v + 10. &v[10] dereferences the memory location just past the array. – Millie Smith Nov 6 '16 at 4:29
13

In case you want to back a class's iteration directly with its std::vector or std::map member, here is the code for that:

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
#include <string>
using std::string;
#include <vector>
using std::vector;
#include <map>
using std::map;


/////////////////////////////////////////////////////
/// classes
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////

class VectorValues {
private:
    vector<int> v = vector<int>(10);

public:
    vector<int>::iterator begin(){
        return v.begin();
    }
    vector<int>::iterator end(){
        return v.end();
    }
    vector<int>::const_iterator begin() const {
        return v.begin();
    }
    vector<int>::const_iterator end() const {
        return v.end();
    }
};

class MapValues {
private:
    map<string,int> v;

public:
    map<string,int>::iterator begin(){
        return v.begin();
    }
    map<string,int>::iterator end(){
        return v.end();
    }
    map<string,int>::const_iterator begin() const {
        return v.begin();
    }
    map<string,int>::const_iterator end() const {
        return v.end();
    }

    const int& operator[](string key) const {
        return v.at(key);
    }
    int& operator[](string key) {
        return v[key];
    } 
};


/////////////////////////////////////////////////////
/// main
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////

int main() {
    // VectorValues
    VectorValues items;
    int i = 0;
    for(int& item : items) {
        item = i;
        i++;
    }
    for(int& item : items)
        cout << item << " ";
    cout << endl << endl;

    // MapValues
    MapValues m;
    m["a"] = 1;
    m["b"] = 2;
    m["c"] = 3;
    for(auto pair: m)
        cout << pair.first << " " << pair.second << endl;
}
  • 1
    It's worth mentioning that const_iterator can also be accessed in an auto (C++11)-compatible way via cbegin, cend, etc. – underscore_d Dec 19 '15 at 14:14
1

Here, I am sharing the simplest example of creating custom type, that will work with "range-based for loop":

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

template<typename T, int sizeOfArray>
class MyCustomType
{
private:
    T *data;
    int indx;
public:
    MyCustomType(){
        data = new T[sizeOfArray];
        indx = -1;
    }
    ~MyCustomType(){
        delete []data;
    }
    void addData(T newVal){
        data[++indx] = newVal;
    }

    //write definition for begin() and end()
    //these two method will be used for "ranged based loop idiom"
    T* begin(){
        return &data[0];
    }
    T* end(){
        return  &data[sizeOfArray];
    }
};
int main()
{
    MyCustomType<double, 2> numberList;
    numberList.addData(20.25);
    numberList.addData(50.12);
    for(auto val: numberList){
        cout<<val<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

Hope, it will be helpful for some novice developer like me :p :)
Thank You.

  • why not allocate one extra element to avoid dereferencing invalid memory in your end method? – AndersK Jun 25 '18 at 16:03
  • @Anders Because almost all end-iterators point to after the end of their containing structure. The end() function itself obviously does not dereference an improper memory location, since it only takes the 'address-of' this memory location. Adding an extra element would mean you'd need more memory, and using your_iterator::end() in any way that would dereference that value would not work with any other iterators anyway because they are built the same way. – Qqwy Feb 12 at 9:33
  • @Qqwy his end method de-refences - return &data[sizeofarray] IMHO it should just return the address data + sizeofarray but what do i know, – AndersK Feb 12 at 12:09
  • @Anders You're correct. Thanks for keeping me sharp :-). Yes, data + sizeofarray would be the correct way to write this. – Qqwy Feb 12 at 16:46
1

Chris Redford's answer also works for Qt containers (of course). Here is an adaption (notice I return a constBegin(), respectively constEnd() from the const_iterator methods):

class MyCustomClass{
    QList<MyCustomDatatype> data_;
public:    
    // ctors,dtor, methods here...

    QList<MyCustomDatatype>::iterator begin() { return data_.begin(); }
    QList<MyCustomDatatype>::iterator end() { return data_.end(); }
    QList<MyCustomDatatype>::const_iterator begin() const{ return data_.constBegin(); }
    QList<MyCustomDatatype>::const_iterator end() const{ return data_.constEnd(); }
};

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