207

Is there a way in JS to get the entire HTML within the html tags, as a string?

document.documentElement.??

14 Answers 14

283

MS added the outerHTML and innerHTML properties some time ago.

According to MDN, outerHTML is supported in Firefox 11, Chrome 0.2, Internet Explorer 4.0, Opera 7, Safari 1.3, Android, Firefox Mobile 11, IE Mobile, Opera Mobile, and Safari Mobile. outerHTML is in the DOM Parsing and Serialization specification.

See quirksmode for browser compatibility for what will work for you. All support innerHTML.

var markup = document.documentElement.innerHTML;
alert(markup);
  • 24
    outerHTML doesn't get the doctype. – CMCDragonkai Apr 10 '14 at 2:50
  • 1
    worked like a charm! thank you! is there any way to get the size of any/all files linked to the document as well including js and css files? – www139 Mar 17 '15 at 2:54
  • @CMCDragonkai: You could get the doctype separately and prepend it to the markup string. Not ideal, I know, but possible. – Mike Branski Nov 19 '15 at 19:58
62

You can do

new XMLSerializer().serializeToString(document)

in browsers newer than IE 9

See https://caniuse.com/#feat=xml-serializer

  • 4
    This was the first correct answer according to date/time stamps. Parts of the page such as the XML declaration will not be included and browsers will manipulate the code when using the other "answers". This is the only post that should be up-voted (dos's posted three days later). People need to pay attention! – John Dec 31 '16 at 3:57
  • 2
    This is not entirely correct since it serializeToString performs an HTML encode. For example if your code contains styles defining fonts such as "Times New Roman", Times, serif the quotes will get html encoded. Perhaps that is not important to some of you but to me it is... – Marko Jun 6 '17 at 20:43
  • 3
    @John well the OP actually asks for "the entire HTML within the html tags". And the selected best answer by Colin Burnett does achieve this. This particular answer (Erik's) will include the html tags and the doctype. That said, this was totally a diamond in the rough for me and exactly what I was looking for! Your comment helped too because it made me spend more time with this answer, so thanks :) – evanrmurphy Oct 26 '17 at 22:46
  • 1
    I think people should be careful with this one, specifically because it returns a value that is not the actual html that your browser receives. In my case, it added attributes to the html tag that the server never actually sent :( – onassar Dec 23 '18 at 19:58
  • For some reason this fails in Edge – kiranvj Jan 9 at 11:02
41

I believe document.documentElement.outerHTML should return that for you.

According to MDN, outerHTML is supported in Firefox 11, Chrome 0.2, Internet Explorer 4.0, Opera 7, Safari 1.3, Android, Firefox Mobile 11, IE Mobile, Opera Mobile, and Safari Mobile. outerHTML is in the DOM Parsing and Serialization specification.

The MSDN page on the outerHTML property notes that it is supported in IE 5+. Colin's answer links to the W3C quirksmode page, which offers a good comparison of cross-browser compatibility (for other DOM features too).

  • Not all browsers support this. – Colin Burnett May 3 '09 at 14:38
  • @Colin: Yeah, good point. From experience, I seem to remember that both IE 6+ and Firefox support it, though the quirksmode page you linked suggests otherwise... – Noldorin May 3 '09 at 14:42
  • Firefox does not support OuterHTML. It is IE proprietary. developer.mozilla.org/En/… – Jesse Dearing May 3 '09 at 14:53
  • 4
    Is there a way to get everything including the doctype and the html tags? – trusktr Apr 10 '12 at 21:36
  • 1
    Mine was first, actually. :P – Noldorin Feb 17 '16 at 19:43
36

I tried the various answers to see what is returned. I'm using the latest version of Chrome.

The suggestion document.documentElement.innerHTML; returned <head> ... </body>

Gaby's suggestion document.getElementsByTagName('html')[0].innerHTML; returned the same.

The suggestion document.documentElement.outerHTML; returned <html><head> ... </body></html> which is everything apart from the 'doctype'.

You can retrieve the doctype object with document.doctype; This returns an object, not a string, so if you need to extract the details as strings for all doctypes up to and including HTML5 it is described here: Get DocType of an HTML as string with Javascript

I only wanted HTML5, so the following was enough for me to create the whole document:

alert('<!DOCTYPE HTML>' + '\n' + document.documentElement.outerHTML);

  • 5
    This is the most complete answer and should be accepted. As of 2016, browser compatibility is complete, and mentioning it in detail (as in the currently accepted answer) is no longer necessary. – Dan Dascalescu Feb 17 '16 at 19:45
9

You can also do:

document.getElementsByTagName('html')[0].innerHTML

You will not get the Doctype or html tag, but everything else...

5
document.documentElement.outerHTML
  • 1
    Not all browsers support this. – Colin Burnett May 3 '09 at 14:38
  • 2
    Supported in Firefox 11, Chrome 0.2, Internet Explorer 4.0, Opera 7, Safari 1.3, Android, Firefox Mobile 11, IE Mobile, Opera Mobile, and Safari Mobile (MDN). outerHTML is in the DOM Parsing and Serialization specification. – XP1 Dec 1 '12 at 1:33
  • Colin's answer is more detailed. – Dan Dascalescu Feb 17 '16 at 19:43
4

PROBABLY ONLY IE:

>     webBrowser1.DocumentText

for FF up from 1.0:

//serialize current DOM-Tree incl. changes/edits to ss-variable
var ns = new XMLSerializer();
var ss= ns.serializeToString(document);
alert(ss.substr(0,300));

may work in FF. (Shows up the VERY FIRST 300 characters from the VERY beginning of source-text, mostly doctype-defs.)

BUT be aware, that the normal "Save As"-Dialog of FF MIGHT NOT save the current state of the page, rather the originallly loaded X/h/tml-source-text !! (a POST-up of ss to some temp-file and redirect to that might deliver a saveable source-text WITH the changes/edits prior made to it.)

Although FF surprises by good recovery on "back" and a NICE inclusion of states/values on "Save (as) ..." for input-like FIELDS, textarea etc. , not on elements in contenteditable/ designMode...

If NOT a xhtml- resp. xml-file (mime-type, NOT just filename-extension!), one may use document.open/write/close to SET the the appr. content to the source-layer, that will be saved on user's save-dialog from the File/Save menue of FF. see: http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/2004/xhtml-faq#docwrite resp.

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/document.write

Neutral to questions of X(ht)ML, try a "view-source:http://..." as the value of the src-attrib of an (script-made!?) iframe, - to access an iframes-document in FF:

<iframe-elementnode>.contentDocument, see google "mdn contentDocument" for appr. members, like 'textContent' for instance. 'Got that years ago and no like to crawl for it. If still of urgent need, mention this, that I got to dive in ...

2
document.documentElement.innerHTML
  • This doesn't return the <html ...> tag. – Dan Dascalescu Feb 17 '16 at 19:44
0

I always use

document.getElementsByTagName('html')[0].innerHTML

Probably not the right way but I can understand it when I see it.

  • This is incorrect because it won't return the <html...> tag. – Dan Dascalescu Feb 17 '16 at 19:47
0

Use document.documentElement.

Same Question answered here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/7289396/2164160

  • That question should be closed as pretty much a duplicate of this one, which is much older. Anyway, the interesting part is that you need .outerHTML and to get the document.doctype, and the most complete answer is Paolo's. – Dan Dascalescu Feb 17 '16 at 19:53
0

To also get things outside the <html>...</html>, most importantly the <!DOCTYPE ...> declaration, you could walk through document.childNodes, turning each into a string:

const html = [...document.childNodes]
    .map(node => nodeToString(node))
    .join('\n') // could use '' instead, but whitespace should not matter.

function nodeToString(node) {
    switch (node.nodeType) {
        case node.ELEMENT_NODE:
            return node.outerHTML
        case node.TEXT_NODE:
            // Text nodes should probably never be encountered, but handling them anyway.
            return node.textContent
        case node.COMMENT_NODE:
            return `<!--${node.textContent}-->`
        case node.DOCUMENT_TYPE_NODE:
            return doctypeToString(node)
        default:
            throw new TypeError(`Unexpected node type: ${node.nodeType}`)
    }
}

I published this code as document-outerhtml on npm.


edit Note the code above depends on a function doctypeToString; its implementation could be as follows (code below is published on npm as doctype-to-string):

function doctypeToString(doctype) {
    if (doctype === null) {
        return ''
    }
    // Checking with instanceof DocumentType might be neater, but how to get a
    // reference to DocumentType without assuming it to be available globally?
    // To play nice with custom DOM implementations, we resort to duck-typing.
    if (!doctype
        || doctype.nodeType !== doctype.DOCUMENT_TYPE_NODE
        || typeof doctype.name !== 'string'
        || typeof doctype.publicId !== 'string'
        || typeof doctype.systemId !== 'string'
    ) {
        throw new TypeError('Expected a DocumentType')
    }
    const doctypeString = `<!DOCTYPE ${doctype.name}`
        + (doctype.publicId ? ` PUBLIC "${doctype.publicId}"` : '')
        + (doctype.systemId
            ? (doctype.publicId ? `` : ` SYSTEM`) + ` "${doctype.systemId}"`
            : ``)
        + `>`
    return doctypeString
}

0

I just need doctype html and should work fine in IE11, Edge and Chrome. I used below code it works fine.

function downloadPage(element, event) {
    var isChrome = /Chrome/.test(navigator.userAgent) && /Google Inc/.test(navigator.vendor);

    if ((navigator.userAgent.indexOf("MSIE") != -1) || (!!document.documentMode == true)) {
        document.execCommand('SaveAs', '1', 'page.html');
        event.preventDefault();
    } else {
        if(isChrome) {
            element.setAttribute('href','data:text/html;charset=UTF-8,'+encodeURIComponent('<!doctype html>' + document.documentElement.outerHTML));
        }
        element.setAttribute('download', 'page.html');
    }
}

and in your anchor tag use like this.

<a href="#" onclick="downloadPage(this,event);" download>Download entire page.</a>

Example

    function downloadPage(element, event) {
    	var isChrome = /Chrome/.test(navigator.userAgent) && /Google Inc/.test(navigator.vendor);
    
    	if ((navigator.userAgent.indexOf("MSIE") != -1) || (!!document.documentMode == true)) {
    		document.execCommand('SaveAs', '1', 'page.html');
    		event.preventDefault();
    	} else {
    		if(isChrome) {
                element.setAttribute('href','data:text/html;charset=UTF-8,'+encodeURIComponent('<!doctype html>' + document.documentElement.outerHTML));
    		}
    		element.setAttribute('download', 'page.html');
    	}
    }
I just need doctype html and should work fine in IE11, Edge and Chrome. 

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum.

<p>
<a href="#" onclick="downloadPage(this,event);"  download><h2>Download entire page.</h2></a></p>

<p>Some image here</p>

<p><img src="https://placeimg.com/250/150/animals"/></p>

0

You have to iterate through the document childNodes and getting the outerHTML content.

in VBA it looks like this

For Each e In document.ChildNodes
    Put ff, , e.outerHTML & vbCrLf
Next e

using this, allows you to get all elements of the web page including < !DOCTYPE > node if it exists

-8

The correct way is actually:

webBrowser1.DocumentText

  • 3
    Only if you are hosting the page in a WinForms WebBrowser control... – Carl Onager Jan 17 '14 at 9:48

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