2

I have created a WCF method that runs an infinite loop, polling every 5 minutes. It writes 2 items to cache, the main item I'm retrieving and the LAST_POLLED. This is successfully called on app start of our web site:

//infinite loop
        while (true)
        {
            try
            {
                _cache.RefreshCache();
                WcfCache.SetCache(LAST_POLLED, DateTime.Now);
            }
            catch(Exception ex)
            {
                //logging exception to database
            }

            //essentially polling interval, though dependent on how long it takes to complete task
            Thread.Sleep(Polling_DELAY);
        }

The LAST_POLLED datetime should have the time it was polled. Occasionally, though, it's storing Jan 1, 0001. I imagine this must be due to the cache disappearing. The app pool for this WCF site is NOT set to Recycle NOR are the worker processes set to shutdown after being idle. This will work for days at a time, but hasn't worked a full week yet.

  1. Why is this cache getting reset?
  2. Is there a better way to code this? I didn't want to create a separate windows service for this to keep down the number of projects/apps, but I can.
  • Running under IIS, I think you should expect that you will be recycled from time to time since so many things can trigger it. – hatchet Nov 17 '11 at 20:00
  • which framework for caching are you using, Enterprise Library, memcached, AppFabric, custom built ... – Lucas B Nov 17 '11 at 20:03
0

This blog post, although not specifically addressing your topic, does have some good information about what might cause your app pool to get recycled.

http://haacked.com/archive/2011/10/16/the-dangers-of-implementing-recurring-background-tasks-in-asp-net.aspx

IIS will itself recycle the entire w3wp.exe process every 29 hours. It’ll just outright put a cap in the w3wp.exe process and bring down all of the app domains with it.

It also contains some information that may solve your problem (HostingEnvironment.RegisterObject)

2

I'm not sure about what type of cache you're using, but by definition things can disappear from cache. Caching is used for speeding up data access, not for data persistence.

For data persistence you should use a data-store. A data-store can be sql-based (e.g. mysql), or even key-value (no-sql, e.g. membase). These would serve you well in this case.

Also, it seems you're using busy-wait. That's not ideal either.

BTW, 01-01-0001 is DateTime.MinValue.

Edit:

another thought #1: you can also save things in your machine's memory, e.g by using a static variable. It won't be persisted nor distributed, but it may suite your need.

another thought #2: I don't think you have to put stuff in the cache and make sure it's there in 5 min intervals. Another way to use a caching mechanism would be as follows:

  1. Get a request for the data.
  2. Check if it's in the cache.
  3. If so - return it.
  4. If not - get the data, cache it, return it.
  • re busy-wait, although sleep is often a code smell, it's not like he's burning cpu for 5 minutes. – hatchet Nov 17 '11 at 20:04
  • I'm using MemoryCache built into .NET (only using 1 server). It seems to me that as long as the machine is running and there is available memory, it should persist. There are In Memory Databases that do just that. Though storing to sql is possible for this, most of the data we're caching is coming from sql originally anyway. Why's it getting wiped? – DougJones Nov 17 '11 at 20:22
  • I think competent_tech gave you an answer to that - e.g: a change to web.config causes an app pool recycle, which in turn will wipe your cache (and static variables values as well). – Tom Nov 17 '11 at 20:25
1

Since this is an ASP.Net application, there are other things that can cause IIS to restart your application and lose the cache.

The most likely possibility, besides what you have already mentioned, is something "touching" either web.config or files in the bin directory. We have seen backup programs, antivirus apps, and "helpful" users all cause this issue in one way or another.

Also, it wouldn't hurt to check the event logs to see if IIS is reporting an application crashing in the app pool, which would also cause this issue.

  • We're running WCF as 1 app pool and the MVC app as another. The WCF app pool would have to be getting restarted without the MVC app getting restarted. I'm not seeing anything in the logs regarding stopping or starting the app pool, though. – DougJones Nov 18 '11 at 13:05

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