36

I would like to create a (non-anonymous) function that sorts an array of objects alphabetically by the key name. I only code straight-out JavaScript so frameworks don't help me in the least.

var people = [
    {'name': 'a75', 'item1': false, 'item2': false},
    {'name': 'z32', 'item1': true,  'item2': false},
    {'name': 'e77', 'item1': false, 'item2': false}
];
  • 1
    What do you have so far? Why do you explicitly want a non-anonymous function? – pimvdb Nov 17 '11 at 22:12
  • A non-anonymous function sorting(json_object,key_to_sort_by) {} – John Nov 17 '11 at 22:14
  • Added the quotes, haven't coded for a few days! Just want to figure out how JSON and JavaScript set the key and then sort. Figure if it's not integer based I could use the sort method perhaps? – John Nov 17 '11 at 22:16
  • Anonymous function example: window.onload = function() {/* stuff();*/} – John Nov 17 '11 at 22:16
  • 5
    What you list above is not JSON, it is a plain JavaScript object. JSON is the string encoded version of a JavaScript object. – Matt Nov 17 '11 at 22:17
110

How about this?

var people = [
{
    name: 'a75',
    item1: false,
    item2: false
},
{
    name: 'z32',
    item1: true,
    item2: false
},
{
    name: 'e77',
    item1: false,
    item2: false
}];

function sort_by_key(array, key)
{
 return array.sort(function(a, b)
 {
  var x = a[key]; var y = b[key];
  return ((x < y) ? -1 : ((x > y) ? 1 : 0));
 });
}

people = sort_by_key(people, 'name');

This allows you to specify the key by which you want to sort the array so that you are not limited to a hard-coded name sort. It will work to sort any array of objects that all share the property which is used as they key. I believe that is what you were looking for?

And here is a jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/6Dgbu/

  • Is it possible to sort by 2 keys? eg. 'last_name', 'first_name'? (similar to mysql's ORDER BY field). Thanks! – Josiah Jan 2 '14 at 23:49
  • @DavidBrainer-Banker - I really like the solution in this answer -- what if I wanted to sort by MULTIPLE keys? Is that possible with this solution or better handled another way? – tamak Dec 2 '15 at 13:51
  • for Descending order of sorting , what should be done ? – Ananta Prasad Aug 31 '16 at 6:53
  • It doesn't work with upper/lowercase values. Please update the code with var x = a[key].toLowerCase(); var y = b[key].toLowerCase(); – Ignacio Ara Jan 8 at 11:12
  • 1
    This algorithm messes up stacksort. Please fix – Justin AnyhowStep Jul 17 at 21:02
26

You can sort an array ([...]) with the .sort function:

var people = [
    {'name': 'a75', 'item1': false, 'item2': false},
    {'name': 'z32', 'item1': true,  'item2': false},
    {'name': 'e77', 'item1': false, 'item2': false},
];

var sorted = people.sort(function IHaveAName(a, b) { // non-anonymous as you ordered...
    return b.name < a.name ?  1 // if b should come earlier, push a to end
         : b.name > a.name ? -1 // if b should come later, push a to begin
         : 0;                   // a and b are equal
});
  • Thanks though that is an annoymous function, I'm trying to do function sort_example(object_name,key_to_sort_by) {} – John Nov 17 '11 at 22:23
  • 1
    @John: It's a named function expression now :) What you want is not too difficult, have a try. – pimvdb Nov 17 '11 at 22:24
  • so after sort what should i console, sorted or people – Freddy Sidauruk Apr 2 '18 at 7:08
9

This isn't a JSON question, per se. Its a javascript array question.

Try this:

people.sort(function(a,b){ 
    var x = a.name < b.name? -1:1; 
    return x; 
});
  • 3
    What if they are equal? – Rocket Hazmat Nov 17 '11 at 22:20
  • I'm trying to do function sort_example(object_name,key_to_sort_by) {} – John Nov 17 '11 at 22:23
  • 2
    +1 I used this to sort prices and I just inverted the bracket '<' for '>' and I got the prices sorted from lowest to highest. Thank you! – Dan Palmieri Sep 15 '14 at 20:42
  • This can blow badly because of comparing same elements returning 1. Depending on the sort function user, anything can happen. – maaartinus May 11 '17 at 14:18
1

var data = [ 1, 2, 5, 3, 1]; data.sort(function(a,b) { return a-b });

With a small compartor and using sort, we can do it

1

My solution for similar sort problem using ECMA 6

var library = [
        {name: 'Steve', course:'WAP', courseID: 'cs452'}, 
        {name: 'Rakesh', course:'WAA', courseID: 'cs545'},
        {name: 'Asad', course:'SWE', courseID: 'cs542'},
];

const sorted_by_name = library.sort( (a,b) => a.name > b.name );

for(let k in sorted_by_name){
    console.log(sorted_by_name[k]);
}

  • Interesting though subjective to browser share / compatibility. If it will work in IE11 then 2017 compatibility is fair otherwise if it requires IE12 ("Edge") it will have to wait until circa 2020. Looks slightly less verbal...though when I originally posted this I asked for a non-anonymous function I could call. – John Sep 5 '17 at 1:08
1

I modified @Geuis 's answer by using lambda and convert it upper case first:

people.sort((a, b) => a.toLocaleUpperCase() < b.toLocaleUpperCase() ? -1 : 1);
0
Array.prototype.sort_by = function(key_func, reverse=false){
    return this.sort( (a, b) => ( key_func(b) - key_func(a) ) * (reverse ? 1 : -1) ) 
}

Then for example if we have

var arr = [ {id: 0, balls: {red: 8,  blue: 10}},
            {id: 2, balls: {red: 6 , blue: 11}},
            {id: 1, balls: {red: 4 , blue: 15}} ]

arr.sort_by(el => el.id, reverse=true)
/* would result in
[ { id: 2, balls: {red: 6 , blue: 11 }},
  { id: 1, balls: {red: 4 , blue: 15 }},
  { id: 0, balls: {red: 8 , blue: 10 }} ]
*/

or

arr.sort_by(el => el.balls.red + el.balls.blue)
/* would result in
[ { id: 2, balls: {red: 6 , blue: 11 }},    // red + blue= 17
  { id: 0, balls: {red: 8 , blue: 10 }},    // red + blue= 18
  { id: 1, balls: {red: 4 , blue: 15 }} ]   // red + blue= 19
*/
-1

var library = [
        {name: 'Steve', course:'WAP', courseID: 'cs452'}, 
        {name: 'Rakesh', course:'WAA', courseID: 'cs545'},
        {name: 'Asad', course:'SWE', courseID: 'cs542'},
];

const sorted_by_name = library.sort( (a,b) => a.name > b.name );

for(let k in sorted_by_name){
    console.log(sorted_by_name[k]);
}

  • 1
    It is always nice to put some explanatory text along with your code, when answering questions. – Leonardo Alves Machado Sep 8 '17 at 12:03
  • The compare function returns a boolean, it should return a number – marcovtwout Nov 6 '17 at 10:45
-3
var people = 
[{"name": 'a75',"item1": "false","item2":"false"}, 
{"name": 'z32',"item1": "true","item2":  "false"}, 
{"name": 'e77',"item1": "false","item2": "false"}]; 

function mycomparator(a,b) {   return parseInt(a.name) - parseInt(b.name);  } 
people.sort(mycomparator); 

something along the lines of this maybe (or as we used to say, this should work).

  • 2
    parseInt('a75') is NaN so this won't really work I guess. – pimvdb Nov 17 '11 at 22:25
  • I don;t think this is appropriate solution when we are dealing with string value, because parseInt on string might give unexpected value, but yaa if you are comparing a string having numeric or decimal value then it will work – Dinesh Gopal Chand Aug 11 at 3:23

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