How can I get the code below to work when I have a month of february? Currently it is getting to the day and then stopping before getting to the if to determine whether it is a leap year.

 if (month == 2) {
    if (day == 29) {
        if (year % 4 != 0 || year % 100 == 0 && year % 400 != 0) {
            field.focus();
             field.value = month +'/' +  '';
        }
    }
    else if (day > 28) {
        field.focus();
             field.value = month +'/' +  '';
    }
}
  • "Stopping" how? Is there an error? – Pekka 웃 Nov 17 '11 at 22:52
  • it never evaluates the year to see if it is a leap year it goes straight to the field.focus and field.value whether it is a leap year or not – Juan Almonte Nov 17 '11 at 23:03
  • Your conditions look a little odd - as they're currently written now, you only check day for values of 29 or greater (based on the day == 29 and day > 28 if clauses). I'm assuming that you meant to write day <= 28, but if that's the case, you could drop the second else if clause and use an else clause directly. It might also be safer to add an additional set of parenthesis to your leap year clause: if (year % 4 != 0 || (year % 100 == 0 && year % 400 != 0)) – JW8 Nov 17 '11 at 23:13
  • 1
    You might need to show some of the surrounding code for how those variables are being set. If you're using a Date object at all remember that it uses zero-based months. – nnnnnn Nov 18 '11 at 1:00

It's safer to use Date objects for datetime stuff, e.g.

isLeap = new Date(year, 1, 29).getMonth() == 1

Since people keep asking about how exactly this works, it has to do with how JS calculates the date value from year-month-day (details here). Basically, it first calculates the first of the month and then adds N -1 days to it. So when we're asking for the 29th Feb on a non-leap year, the result will be the 1st Feb + 28 days = 1st March:

> new Date(2015, 1, 29)
< Sun Mar 01 2015 00:00:00 GMT+0100 (CET)

On a leap year, the 1st + 28 = 29th Feb:

> new Date(2016, 1, 29)
< Mon Feb 29 2016 00:00:00 GMT+0100 (CET)

In the code above, I set the date to 29th Feb and look if a roll-over took place. If not (the month is still 1, i.e. February), this is a leap year, otherwise a non-leap one.

  • 14
    Holy cow. What a hack. :) – Šime Vidas Nov 17 '11 at 23:41
  • 1
    Live demo: jsfiddle.net/bJ4cH – Šime Vidas Nov 17 '11 at 23:47
  • very great hack! – user1386320 Mar 28 '13 at 2:03
  • clever boy! nice – jason Jun 18 '13 at 6:35
  • 7
    Use for low volume scenarios only as this is around 100 times slower than using something like isLeap = !((yr % 4) || (!(yr % 100) && (yr % 400))); jsperf.com/ily/7 – Gone Coding Oct 24 '13 at 16:08

Compared to using new Date() this is is around 100 times faster!

Update:

This latest version uses a bit test of the bottom 3 bits (is it a multiple of 4), as well as a check for the year being a multiple of 16 (bottom 4 bits in binary is 15) and being a multiple of 25.

ily = function(y) {return !(y & 3 || !(y % 25) && y & 15);};

http://jsperf.com/ily/15

It is slightly faster again than my previous version (below):

ily = function(yr) {return !((yr % 4) || (!(yr % 100) && (yr % 400)));};

http://jsperf.com/ily/7

It is also 5% faster, compared to the already fast conditional operator version by broc.seib

Speed Test results: http://jsperf.com/ily/6

Expected logic test results:

alert(ily(1900)); // false
alert(ily(2000)); // true
alert(ily(2001)); // false
alert(ily(2002)); // false
alert(ily(2003)); // false
alert(ily(2004)); // true
alert(ily(2100)); // false
alert(ily(2400)); // true

Correct and Fast:

ily = function(yr) { return (yr%400)?((yr%100)?((yr%4)?false:true):false):true; }

If you are in a loop or counting the nanoseconds, this is two magnitudes faster than running your year through a new Date() object. Compare the performance here: http://jsperf.com/ily

  • 2
    As this is just combining boolean compares with boolean results, you can express this without the conditional operators but just &&'s, ||'s and short-circuiting. Also around 5% faster: jsperf.com/ily/6 – Gone Coding Oct 24 '13 at 16:02
  • Do you know what a negation is by now? – Frondor Jul 23 at 16:58
isLeap = !(new Date(year, 1, 29).getMonth()-1)

...subtraction by one should work even faster than compare on most CPU architectures.

  • If you were required to calculate 1000s of these per second I might agree, however readability should trump speed when the speed difference concerned is virtually negligible between them. – Gone Coding Oct 24 '13 at 15:25
  • Just ran some speed tests and new Date is around 100 times slower than using boolean logic (say something like !((yr % 4) || (!(yr % 100) && (yr % 400)))). You could say I have now thrown readability out the window with this one for the sake of speed, but 100 times may be worth it :) – Gone Coding Oct 24 '13 at 16:11

I use this because I hate having to keep referring to January as 0 and February as 1. To me and PHP and readable dates, February=2. I know it doesn't really matter as the number never changes but it just keeps my brain thinking the same across different code.

var year = 2012;
var isLeap = new Date(year,2,1,-1).getDate()==29;

Better historical computation of leap years.

The code below takes into account that leap years were introduced in 45BC with the Julian calendar, and that the majority of the Western world adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1582CE, and that 0CE = 1BC.

isLeap = function(yr) {
  if (yr > 1582) return !((yr % 4) || (!(yr % 100) && (yr % 400)));
  if (yr >= 0) return !(yr % 4);
  if (yr >= -45) return !((yr + 1) % 4);
  return false;
};

Britain and its colonies adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752, so if you are more Anglo centric this version is better (We'll assume Britain adopted the Julian calendar with Roman conquest starting in 43CE).

isLeap = function(yr) {
  if (yr > 1752) return !((yr % 4) || (!(yr % 100) && (yr % 400)));
  if (yr >= 43) return !(yr % 4);
  return false;
};

You can easily make this to work calling .isLeapYear() from momentjs:

var notLeapYear = moment('2018-02-29')
console.log(notLeapYear.isLeapYear()); // false

var leapYear = moment('2020-02-29')
console.log(leapYear.isLeapYear()); // true
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.21.0/moment.min.js"></script>

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.