25

I am learning Java using the book Java: The Complete Reference. Currently I am working on the topic Recursion.

Please Note: There are similar questions on stackoverflow. I searched them but I didn't find the solution to my question. I am confused with the logic in the following program.

If I run the below program, it produces the correct output, but I didn't understand the logic.

  • I didn't understand the logic in the following line : result = fact(n-1) * n;
  • From my knowledge, If we pass the value of n=4 as shown in the below program,
  • Then, 3 * 4 is stored in the result i.e., 12.
  • Again, fact(n-1) is called. Then n becomes 3.
  • Then the 2 * 3 is stored in the result replacing the previous 12.
  • I think you understood where I am stuck up/confused.

  • Thank you.

class Calculation
{
    int fact(int n)
    {
        int result;

       if(n==1)
         return 1;

       result = fact(n-1) * n;
       return result;
    }
}

public class Factorial
{
     public static void main(String args[])
     {
       Calculation obj_one = new Calculation();

       int a = obj_one.fact(4);
       System.out.println("The factorial of the number is : " + a);
     }
}
  • 2
    My advice is before digging deep into Java, you first need to understand the maths behind recursion. If you have not done so, this will be a very good start for you en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursion – GETah Nov 18 '11 at 13:59
  • 1
    Hope this makes you much clearer programmerinterview.com/index.php/recursion/… – Rangesh Jul 23 '12 at 13:10

18 Answers 18

10

result is a local variable of the fact method. So each time the fact method is called, the result is stored in a different variable than the previous fact invocation.

So when fact is invoked with 3 as argument, you can imagine that its result is

 result3 = fact(2) * 3
 result3 = result2 * 3
 result3 = 1 * 2 * 3
51

First you should understand how factorial works.

Lets take 4! as an example.

4! = 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 = 24

Let us simulate the code using the example above:

int fact(int n)
    {
        int result;
       if(n==0 || n==1)
         return 1;

       result = fact(n-1) * n;
       return result;
    }

In most programming language, we have what we call function stack. It is just like a deck of cards, where each card is placed above the other--and each card may be thought of as a function So, passing on method fact:

Stack level 1: fact(4) // n = 4 and is not equal to 1. So we call fact(n-1)*n

Stack level 2: fact(3)

Stack level 3: fact(2)

Stack level 4: fact(1) // now, n = 1. so we return 1 from this function.

returning values...

Stack level 3: 2 * fact(1) = 2 * 1 = 2

Stack level 2: 3 * fact(2) = 3 * 2 = 6

Stack level 1: 4 * fact(3) = 4 * 6 = 24

so we got 24.

Take note of these lines:

result = fact(n-1) * n;
           return result;

or simply:

return fact(n-1) * n;

This calls the function itself. Using 4 as an example,

In sequence according to function stacks..

return fact(3) * 4;
return fact(2) * 3 * 4
return fact(1) * 2 * 3 * 4

Substituting results...

return 1 * 2 * 3 * 4 = return 24

I hope you get the point.

  • I think you meant // n = 4 and is not equal to 1. Not sure where the 12 came from. – Gray Nov 18 '11 at 14:01
  • yes.. edited.. thanks.. – Neigyl R. Noval Nov 18 '11 at 14:05
  • What I meant was, factorial of 4 = 4 * 3 * 2 * 1. Im my question, at first I thought the value 4*3 will be stored in the result. – user907629 Nov 18 '11 at 14:05
  • yes.. it will be stored in result.. however, we call the function again, so it is not the real result.. That result will be called when we are returning values... ACtually, that was 4 * fact(3). However, in fact(3), we also have 3 * fact(2). In fact(2), we also have 2 * fact(1). Now we end up in fact(1) because n=1. So we return values. 2 * 1, then 3 * 2 * 1, and finally 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 – Neigyl R. Noval Nov 18 '11 at 14:08
19

Here is yet another explanation of how the factorial calculation using recursion works.

Let's modify source code slightly:

int factorial(int n) {
      if (n <= 1)
            return 1;
      else
            return n * factorial(n - 1);
}

Here is calculation of 3! in details:

enter image description here

Source: RECURSION (Java, C++) | Algorithms and Data Structures

9

Your confusion, I believe, comes from the fact that you think there is only one result variable, whereas actually there is a result variable for each function call. Therefor, old results aren't replaced, but returned.

TO ELABORATE:

int fact(int n)
{
    int result;

   if(n==1)
     return 1;

   result = fact(n-1) * n;
   return result;
}

Assume a call to fact(2):

int result;
if ( n == 1 ) // false, go to next statement
result = fact(1) * 2; // calls fact(1):
|    
|fact(1)
|    int result;  //different variable
|    if ( n == 1 )  // true
|        return 1;  // this will return 1, i.e. call to fact(1) is 1
result = 1 * 2; // because fact(1) = 1
return 2;

Hope it's clearer now.

  • Ya, you got my point. Can you please elaborate. – user907629 Nov 18 '11 at 13:56
6
public class Factorial {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(factorial(4));
    }

    private static long factorial(int i) {

        if(i<0)  throw new IllegalArgumentException("x must be >= 0"); 
        return i==0||i==1? 1:i*factorial(i-1);
    }
}
  • 1
    Please let me know why the downvote? – SanA Mar 21 '16 at 16:16
  • 1
    problably because you didn't explain anything, but I like your solution and I've upvoted. – another Jun 3 '16 at 18:43
5

What happens is that the recursive call itself results in further recursive behaviour. If you were to write it out you get:

 fact(4)
 fact(3) * 4;
 (fact(2) * 3) * 4;
 ((fact(1) * 2) * 3) * 4;
 ((1 * 2) * 3) * 4;
3

The key point that you missing here is that the variable "result" is a stack variable, and as such it does not get "replaced". To elaborate, every time fact is called, a NEW variable called "result" is created internally in the interpreter and linked to that invocation of the methods. This is in contrast of object fields which linked to the instance of the object and not a specific method call

1

Although this is old, it still keeps coming up pretty well in google. So I figured I'd mention this. No one mentioned to check for when x = 0.

0! and 1! both = 1.

This isn't being checked with the previous answers, and would cause a stack overflow, if fact(0) was run. Anyway simple fix:

public static int fact(int x){
    if (x==1 | x==0)
        return 1;
    return fact(x-1) * x;
}// fact
1

A recursive solution using ternary operators.

public static int fac(int n) {
    return (n < 1) ? 1 : n*fac(n-1);
}
  • 4
    return n == 1 || n==0 ? 1 : n * fac(n - 1); – ggb667 Oct 22 '14 at 23:58
  • return (n<=1) ? 1 : n*fact(n-1) – Alican Balik Jan 18 '18 at 12:26
1

To understand it you have to declare the method in the simplest way possible and martynas nailed it on May 6th post:

int fact(int n) {
    if(n==0) return 1;
    else return n * fact(n-1);
}

read the above implementation and you will understand.

  • I like this solution as it is the most succinct and also includes the check for 0 and 1. If you don't think it checks for 1, run it in your head with n = 1. – Rodney P. Barbati Jul 24 at 20:28
0

In my opinion, and that being the opinion of someone with beginner level knowledge of java, I would suggest that the n == 1 to be changed to n <= 1 or (n == 0)||(n==1) because the factorial of 0 is 1.

0

The correct one is :

int factorial(int n)
{
    if(n==0||n==1)
        return 1;
    else 
        return n*factorial(n-1);
}

This would return 1 for factorial 0. Do it believe me . I have learned this the hard way. Just for not keeping the condition for 0 could not clear an interview.

0

IMHO, the key for understanding recursion-related actions is:

  1. First, we dive into stack recursively, and with every call we somehow modify a value (e.g. n-1 in func(n-1);) which determines whether the recursion should go deeper and deeper.
  2. Once recursionStopCondition is met (e.g. n == 0), the recursions stops, and methods do actual work and return values to the caller method in upper stacks, thus bubbling to the top of the stack.
  3. It is important to catch the value returned from deeper stack, somehow modify it (multiplying by n in your case), and then return this modified value topwards the stack. The common mistake is that the value from the deepest stack frame is returned straight to the top of the stack, so that all method invocations are ignored.

Surely, methods can do useful work before they dive into recursion (from the top to the bottom of the stack), or on the way back.

0

Using Java 8 and above, using recursion itself

  UnaryOperator<Long> fact = num -> num<1 ? 1 : num * this.fact.apply(num-1);

And use it like

  fact.apply(5); // prints 120

Internally it calculate like

5*(4*(3*(2*(1*(1)))))
-1
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Factorial {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner keyboard = new Scanner(System.in);
        int n; 
        System.out.println("Enter number: ");
        n = keyboard.nextInt();
        int number = calculatefactorial(n);
        System.out.println("Factorial: " +number);
    }
    public static int calculatefactorial(int n){
        int factorialnumbers=1;
        while(n>0){
         factorialnumbers=(int)(factorialnumbers*n--);   
        }
        return factorialnumbers;
    }
}
-1
public class Factorial2 {
    public static long factorial(long x) {
        if (x < 0) 
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("x must be >= 0");
        if (x <= 1) 
            return 1;  // Stop recursing here
        else 
           return x * factorial(x-1);  // Recurse by calling ourselves
    }
}
-1
public class Factorial {
public static void main(String[] args) {
   int n = 7;
   int result = 1;
   for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++) {
       result = result * i;
   }
   System.out.println("The factorial of 7 is " + result);
}
}
  • 2
    Add some explanation with answer for how this answer help OP in fixing current issue – ρяσѕρєя K Nov 4 '16 at 7:41
-1

Well variable "result" is a local variable. When fact() method is called from "main" method variable "result" is stored in different variable.

Also line : result = fact(n-1) * n; 

here logic is finding factorial using recursion. Recursion in java is a procedure in which a method calls itself.

Meanwhile you can refer this resource on factorial of a number using recursion.

protected by user207421 Mar 6 '18 at 9:16

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