77

I have several same HTML elements going one after another:

<span>1</span>
<span>2</span>
<span>3</span>

I'm looking for the best way of adding space BETWEEN the elements using CSS only

[no space]  [1]  [space 10px]  [2]  [space 10px]  [3]  [no space]

Additionally:

  • Please write down browser compatibility of your receipts

UPDATE

It looks like I was unclear. I don't want to use ANY ADDITIONAL HTML MARKUP like

<span></span>  <span></span>  <span class="last_span"></span>

I don't want to use tables

I want the first and last span to be targeted automatically by CSS

I don't want to use javascript

Optional requirement: last span can be NOT LAST CHILD of the parent tag, but it will be the LAST SPAN of the parent tag. Spans do not have any other tags between them.

  • Maybe you should consider using a table. Depends on what data goes into the text – Madara Uchiha Nov 18 '11 at 15:47
  • Is the number of spans variable? – thirtydot Nov 18 '11 at 15:56
  • @Truth last resort should be tables. – Tim Joyce Nov 18 '11 at 15:59
  • The span elements are generated by the web service I don't have access to. So I can't change the markup. However, I can fully use CSS – Dan Nov 18 '11 at 16:01
  • With questions like this, you should always specify the browser support you require. "I need IE7 support" will receive completely different answers to "I'm only using Chrome". – thirtydot Nov 18 '11 at 16:16

10 Answers 10

180

A good way to do it is this:

span + span {
    margin-left: 10px;
}

Every span preceded by a span (so, every span except the first) will have margin-left: 10px.

Here's a more detailed answer to a similar question: Separators between elements without hacks

  • 3
    good find!!!!!! – Tim Joyce Nov 18 '11 at 16:07
  • 1
    Looks to have IE7 static support quirksmode.org/css/contents.html – Dan Nov 21 '11 at 13:56
  • This is awesome. I've used this solution in a current project and works great. Thanks for sharing. – Ricardo Nunes Jul 11 '14 at 17:13
  • 8
    This is a nice solution, though if your container will span to multiple lines it fails. – Savas Vedova Sep 4 '14 at 8:06
  • It also works with classes, like this: .sidebar-img + .sidebar-text { margin-left: 40px; } – parsecer Oct 28 '18 at 17:52
23

Just use margin or padding.

In your specific case, you could use margin:0 10px only on the 2nd <span>.

UPDATE

Here's a nice CSS3 solution (jsFiddle):

span {
    margin: 0 10px;
}

span:first-of-type {
    margin-left: 0;
}

span:last-of-type {
    margin-right: 0;
}

Advanced element selection using selectors like :nth-child(), :last-child, :first-of-type, etc. is supported since Internet Explorer 9.

  • 2
    Example: jsfiddle.net/dTmy6 – motoxer4533 Nov 18 '11 at 15:48
  • You have a great answer, Simone, but could you please solve the question without specifying the last span manually? This should be the CSS's job – Dan Nov 18 '11 at 15:59
  • You are welcome – Simone Nov 18 '11 at 16:13
  • 1
    Looks to have IE7 static support quirksmode.org/css/contents.html – Dan Nov 21 '11 at 14:00
  • A little clarification for downvoters: @thirtydot's answer is awesome and I like it a lot, but it yields an additional margin-left on the last span, which is not exactly what OP wanted. – Simone Aug 19 '13 at 11:36
8

You can take advantage of the fact that span is an inline element

span{
     word-spacing:10px;
}

However, this solution will break if you have more than one word of text in your span

6

That's so easy.

You can style elements with excluding first one, just in one line of code:

span ~ span {
padding-left: 10px;
}

and done, with no class manipulating.

  • 1
    This one works perfekt. span + span didnt work but span ~ span works like a charm! Thanks – juliusmh Apr 24 '16 at 11:42
  • Glad that works for you! – Angie Apr 30 '16 at 5:21
3

You can write like this:

span{
 margin-left:10px;
}
span:first-child{
 margin-left:0;
}
3
span:not(:last-child) {
    margin-right: 10px;
}
1

<span> is an inline element so you cant make spacing on them without making it block level. Try this

Horizontal

span{
    margin-right: 10px;
    float: left;
}

Vertical

span{
    margin-bottom: 10px;
}

Compatible with all browsers.

1

You should wrap your elements inside a container, then use new CSS3 features like css grid, free course, and then use grid-gap:value that was created for your specific problem

span{
  border:1px solid red;
}
.inRow{
  display:grid;
  grid-template-columns:repeat(auto-fill,auto);
  grid-gap:10px /*This add space between elements, only works on grid items*/
}
.inColumn{
  display:grid;
  grid-template-rows:repeat(auto-fill,auto);
  grid-gap:15px;
}
<div class="inrow">
  <span>1</span>
  <span>2</span>
  <span>3</span>
</div>
<div class="inColumn">
  <span>4</span>
  <span>5</span>
  <span>6</span>
</div>

  • I was looking to add space between elements of a div class using css style. I used your example to build my code for that. Worked like a charm. Thank you! – Elias EstatisticsEU Nov 3 '18 at 18:24
0
span.middle {
    margin: 0 10px 0 10px; /*top right bottom left */
}

<span>text</span> <span class="middle">text</span> <span>text</span>
0

Or, instead of setting margin and than overriding it, you can just set it properly right away with the following combo:

span:not(:first-of-type) {
    margin-left:  5px;
}

span:not(:last-of-type) {
    margin-right: 5px;
}
  • Good answer, the restriction is the browser support of :first-of-type and :last-of-type CSS selectors. – Dan Nov 14 '14 at 21:35
  • ...also check for not expression browser support – Dan Nov 14 '14 at 21:38
  • 1
    @Dan it's actually great, all several last-years browsers are covered. But I must admit, that yzoja's solution is even smarter :) – jalooc Nov 15 '14 at 21:25
  • This solution is superior in the specific case that you are going to also include borders between elements as separators (so like a UL in a nav, for example), as it will properly place the border in the middle of the spacing. – Mir Apr 6 '15 at 21:38

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