155

All reservations about unsecuring your SecureString by creating a System.String out of it aside, how can it be done?

How can I convert an ordinary System.Security.SecureString to System.String?

I'm sure many of you who are familiar with SecureString are going to respond that one should never transform a SecureString to an ordinary .NET string because it removes all security protections. I know. But right now my program does everything with ordinary strings anyway, and I'm trying to enhance its security and although I'm going to be using an API that returns a SecureString to me I am not trying to use that to increase my security.

I'm aware of Marshal.SecureStringToBSTR, but I don't know how to take that BSTR and make a System.String out of it.

For those who may demand to know why I would ever want to do this, well, I'm taking a password from a user and submitting it as an html form POST to log the user into a web site. So... this really has to be done with managed, unencrypted buffers. If I could even get access to the unmanaged, unencrypted buffer I imagine I could do byte-by-byte stream writing on the network stream and hope that that keeps the password secure the whole way. I'm hoping for an answer to at least one of these scenarios.

11 Answers 11

191
0

Use the System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal class:

String SecureStringToString(SecureString value) {
  IntPtr valuePtr = IntPtr.Zero;
  try {
    valuePtr = Marshal.SecureStringToGlobalAllocUnicode(value);
    return Marshal.PtrToStringUni(valuePtr);
  } finally {
    Marshal.ZeroFreeGlobalAllocUnicode(valuePtr);
  }
}

If you want to avoid creating a managed string object, you can access the raw data using Marshal.ReadInt16(IntPtr, Int32):

void HandleSecureString(SecureString value) {
  IntPtr valuePtr = IntPtr.Zero;
  try {
    valuePtr = Marshal.SecureStringToGlobalAllocUnicode(value);
    for (int i=0; i < value.Length; i++) {
      short unicodeChar = Marshal.ReadInt16(valuePtr, i*2);
      // handle unicodeChar
    }
  } finally {
    Marshal.ZeroFreeGlobalAllocUnicode(valuePtr);
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Got my up-vote too even years later, thanks for the help! Just a quick note: this also works as a static, in its own memory. – John Suit Sep 17 '14 at 15:18
  • I used StopWatch and SecureStringToString took 4.6sec to run. It's to slow for me. Does anyone get the same time or something faster? – radbyx Jan 6 '16 at 11:44
  • @radbyx In a quick and dirty test setup, I can call it 1000 times in 76ms. The first invocation takes 0.3 ms and subsequent invocations ~0.07ms. How large is your secure string and which version of the framework are you using? – Rasmus Faber Jan 6 '16 at 12:00
  • Length om my secureString is 168. I am using .NET Framework 3.5 if that answered your question? I have tryed 5-10 times is always around 4.5-4.65 sec~ I would love to get your time – radbyx Jan 6 '16 at 12:07
  • @RasmusFaber My bad, I had added a Database.GetConnectionString() into your code, to get my secureString, which was the evil part that took almost 5sec(and yes I should look into that! :) Your code took .00 mili seconds in my stopwatch so it's all good. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. – radbyx Jan 6 '16 at 12:20
108
0

Obviously you know how this defeats the whole purpose of a SecureString, but I'll restate it anyway.

If you want a one-liner, try this: (.NET 4 and above only)

string password = new System.Net.NetworkCredential(string.Empty, securePassword).Password;

Where securePassword is a SecureString.

| improve this answer | |
  • 10
    Although it does defeat the purpose in production, your solution is perfect for unit tests. Thanks. – beterthanlife Dec 10 '14 at 12:18
  • This helped me to figure out that a SecureString (System.Security.SecureString) was not being passed to my ApiController (webapi). Thx – granadaCoder Jan 6 '16 at 17:54
  • 5
    Note in PowerShell this is [System.Net.NetworkCredential]::new('', $securePassword).Password – stijn Jul 17 '17 at 14:12
  • 1
    @TheIncorrigible1 can you elaborate? E.g. when is '' not the same type as [String]::Empty? Also New-Object Net.Credential doesn't work for me: Cannot find type [Net.Credential]: verify that the assembly containing this type is loaded – stijn Nov 9 '18 at 11:16
  • 2
    It defeats the purpose of a SecureString because it makes a non-encrypted copy of your SecureString content in to a normal string. Every time you do that, you are adding at least one (and with Garbage Collection possibly multiple) copies of your unencrypted string to memory. This is considered a risk for some security sensitive applications and SecureString was implemented specifically to reduce the risk. – Steve In CO Aug 19 '19 at 15:24
49
0

Dang. right after posting this I found the answer deep in this article. But if anyone knows how to access the IntPtr unmanaged, unencrypted buffer that this method exposes, one byte at a time so that I don't have to create a managed string object out of it to keep my security high, please add an answer. :)

static String SecureStringToString(SecureString value)
{
    IntPtr bstr = Marshal.SecureStringToBSTR(value);

    try
    {
        return Marshal.PtrToStringBSTR(bstr);
    }
    finally
    {
        Marshal.FreeBSTR(bstr);
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • You can certainly use the unsafe keyword and a char*, just call bstr.ToPointer() and cast. – Ben Voigt Jun 21 '16 at 16:23
  • @BenVoigt BSTR has a null terminator after the string data for safety, but also allows null characters embedded in the string. So it's a bit more complicated than that, you also need to retrieve the length prefix that sits before that pointer. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/windows/desktop/… – Wim Coenen Nov 8 '19 at 11:29
  • @WimCoenen: True but unimportant. The length stored in the BSTR will be a copy of the length already available from SecureString.Length. – Ben Voigt Nov 8 '19 at 15:27
  • @BenVoigt ah, my bad. I thought SecureString didn't expose any information about the string. – Wim Coenen Nov 8 '19 at 15:45
  • @WimCoenen: SecureString is not trying to hide the value, it's trying to prevent copies of the value from being made into regions which cannot be reliably overwritten, such as garbage collected memory, pagefile, etc. The intention is that when the SecureString lifetime ends, absolutely no copy of the secret remains in memory. It doesn't prevent you from making and leaking a copy, but it never does. – Ben Voigt Nov 8 '19 at 19:06
15
0

In my opinion, extension methods are the most comfortable way to solve this.

I took Steve in CO's excellent answer and put it into an extension class as follows, together with a second method I added to support the other direction (string -> secure string) as well, so you can create a secure string and convert it into a normal string afterwards:

public static class Extensions
{
    // convert a secure string into a normal plain text string
    public static String ToPlainString(this System.Security.SecureString secureStr)
    {
        String plainStr=new System.Net.NetworkCredential(string.Empty, secureStr).Password;
        return plainStr;
    }

    // convert a plain text string into a secure string
    public static System.Security.SecureString ToSecureString(this String plainStr)
    {
        var secStr = new System.Security.SecureString(); secStr.Clear();
        foreach (char c in plainStr.ToCharArray())
        {
            secStr.AppendChar(c);
        }
        return secStr;
    }
}

With this, you can now simply convert your strings back and forth like so:

// create a secure string
System.Security.SecureString securePassword = "MyCleverPwd123".ToSecureString(); 
// convert it back to plain text
String plainPassword = securePassword.ToPlainString();  // convert back to normal string

But keep in mind the decoding method should only be used for testing.

| improve this answer | |
14
0

I think it would be best for SecureString dependent functions to encapsulate their dependent logic in an anonymous function for better control over the decrypted string in memory (once pinned).

The implementation for decrypting SecureStrings in this snippet will:

  1. Pin the string in memory (which is what you want to do but appears to be missing from most answers here).
  2. Pass its reference to the Func/Action delegate.
  3. Scrub it from memory and release the GC in the finally block.

This obviously makes it a lot easier to "standardize" and maintain callers vs. relying on less desirable alternatives:

  • Returning the decrypted string from a string DecryptSecureString(...) helper function.
  • Duplicating this code wherever it is needed.

Notice here, you have two options:

  1. static T DecryptSecureString<T> which allows you to access the result of the Func delegate from the caller (as shown in the DecryptSecureStringWithFunc test method).
  2. static void DecryptSecureString is simply a "void" version which employ an Action delegate in cases where you actually don't want/need to return anything (as demonstrated in the DecryptSecureStringWithAction test method).

Example usage for both can be found in the StringsTest class included.

Strings.cs

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Security;

namespace SecurityUtils
{
    public partial class Strings
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Passes decrypted password String pinned in memory to Func delegate scrubbed on return.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T">Generic type returned by Func delegate</typeparam>
        /// <param name="action">Func delegate which will receive the decrypted password pinned in memory as a String object</param>
        /// <returns>Result of Func delegate</returns>
        public static T DecryptSecureString<T>(SecureString secureString, Func<string, T> action)
        {
            var insecureStringPointer = IntPtr.Zero;
            var insecureString = String.Empty;
            var gcHandler = GCHandle.Alloc(insecureString, GCHandleType.Pinned);

            try
            {
                insecureStringPointer = Marshal.SecureStringToGlobalAllocUnicode(secureString);
                insecureString = Marshal.PtrToStringUni(insecureStringPointer);

                return action(insecureString);
            }
            finally
            {
                //clear memory immediately - don't wait for garbage collector
                fixed(char* ptr = insecureString )
                {
                    for(int i = 0; i < insecureString.Length; i++)
                    {
                        ptr[i] = '\0';
                    }
                }

                insecureString = null;

                gcHandler.Free();
                Marshal.ZeroFreeGlobalAllocUnicode(insecureStringPointer);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Runs DecryptSecureString with support for Action to leverage void return type
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="secureString"></param>
        /// <param name="action"></param>
        public static void DecryptSecureString(SecureString secureString, Action<string> action)
        {
            DecryptSecureString<int>(secureString, (s) =>
            {
                action(s);
                return 0;
            });
        }
    }
}

StringsTest.cs

using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
using System.Security;

namespace SecurityUtils.Test
{
    [TestClass]
    public class StringsTest
    {
        [TestMethod]
        public void DecryptSecureStringWithFunc()
        {
            // Arrange
            var secureString = new SecureString();

            foreach (var c in "UserPassword123".ToCharArray())
                secureString.AppendChar(c);

            secureString.MakeReadOnly();

            // Act
            var result = Strings.DecryptSecureString<bool>(secureString, (password) =>
            {
                return password.Equals("UserPassword123");
            });

            // Assert
            Assert.IsTrue(result);
        }

        [TestMethod]
        public void DecryptSecureStringWithAction()
        {
            // Arrange
            var secureString = new SecureString();

            foreach (var c in "UserPassword123".ToCharArray())
                secureString.AppendChar(c);

            secureString.MakeReadOnly();

            // Act
            var result = false;

            Strings.DecryptSecureString(secureString, (password) =>
            {
                result = password.Equals("UserPassword123");
            });

            // Assert
            Assert.IsTrue(result);
        }
    }
}

Obviously, this doesn't prevent abuse of this function in the following manner, so just be careful not to do this:

[TestMethod]
public void DecryptSecureStringWithAction()
{
    // Arrange
    var secureString = new SecureString();

    foreach (var c in "UserPassword123".ToCharArray())
        secureString.AppendChar(c);

    secureString.MakeReadOnly();

    // Act
    string copyPassword = null;

    Strings.DecryptSecureString(secureString, (password) =>
    {
        copyPassword = password; // Please don't do this!
    });

    // Assert
    Assert.IsNull(copyPassword); // Fails
}

Happy coding!

| improve this answer | |
  • Why not use Marshal.Copy(new byte[insecureString.Length], 0, insecureStringPointer, (int)insecureString.Length); instead of the fixed section? – sclarke81 Jan 29 '19 at 10:39
  • @sclarke81, good idea, but you'll need to use [char], not [byte]. – mklement0 Mar 9 at 20:08
  • The overall approach is promising, but I don't think your attempt at pinning the managed string that contains the insecure (plain-text) copy is effective: what you're pinning instead is the original string object that you've initialized to String.Empty, not the newly allocated instance created and returned by Marshal.PtrToStringUni(). – mklement0 Mar 9 at 20:35
7
0

I created the following extension methods based on the answer from rdev5. Pinning the managed string is important as it prevents the garbage collector from moving it around and leaving behind copies that you're unable to erase.

I think the advantage of my solution has is that no unsafe code is needed.

/// <summary>
/// Allows a decrypted secure string to be used whilst minimising the exposure of the
/// unencrypted string.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Generic type returned by Func delegate.</typeparam>
/// <param name="secureString">The string to decrypt.</param>
/// <param name="action">
/// Func delegate which will receive the decrypted password as a string object
/// </param>
/// <returns>Result of Func delegate</returns>
/// <remarks>
/// This method creates an empty managed string and pins it so that the garbage collector
/// cannot move it around and create copies. An unmanaged copy of the the secure string is
/// then created and copied into the managed string. The action is then called using the
/// managed string. Both the managed and unmanaged strings are then zeroed to erase their
/// contents. The managed string is unpinned so that the garbage collector can resume normal
/// behaviour and the unmanaged string is freed.
/// </remarks>
public static T UseDecryptedSecureString<T>(this SecureString secureString, Func<string, T> action)
{
    int length = secureString.Length;
    IntPtr sourceStringPointer = IntPtr.Zero;

    // Create an empty string of the correct size and pin it so that the GC can't move it around.
    string insecureString = new string('\0', length);
    var insecureStringHandler = GCHandle.Alloc(insecureString, GCHandleType.Pinned);

    IntPtr insecureStringPointer = insecureStringHandler.AddrOfPinnedObject();

    try
    {
        // Create an unmanaged copy of the secure string.
        sourceStringPointer = Marshal.SecureStringToBSTR(secureString);

        // Use the pointers to copy from the unmanaged to managed string.
        for (int i = 0; i < secureString.Length; i++)
        {
            short unicodeChar = Marshal.ReadInt16(sourceStringPointer, i * 2);
            Marshal.WriteInt16(insecureStringPointer, i * 2, unicodeChar);
        }

        return action(insecureString);
    }
    finally
    {
        // Zero the managed string so that the string is erased. Then unpin it to allow the
        // GC to take over.
        Marshal.Copy(new byte[length], 0, insecureStringPointer, length);
        insecureStringHandler.Free();

        // Zero and free the unmanaged string.
        Marshal.ZeroFreeBSTR(sourceStringPointer);
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Allows a decrypted secure string to be used whilst minimising the exposure of the
/// unencrypted string.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="secureString">The string to decrypt.</param>
/// <param name="action">
/// Func delegate which will receive the decrypted password as a string object
/// </param>
/// <returns>Result of Func delegate</returns>
/// <remarks>
/// This method creates an empty managed string and pins it so that the garbage collector
/// cannot move it around and create copies. An unmanaged copy of the the secure string is
/// then created and copied into the managed string. The action is then called using the
/// managed string. Both the managed and unmanaged strings are then zeroed to erase their
/// contents. The managed string is unpinned so that the garbage collector can resume normal
/// behaviour and the unmanaged string is freed.
/// </remarks>
public static void UseDecryptedSecureString(this SecureString secureString, Action<string> action)
{
    UseDecryptedSecureString(secureString, (s) =>
    {
        action(s);
        return 0;
    });
}
| improve this answer | |
  • While your code doesn't leak a copy of the string, it still represents a pit of despair. Nearly every operation on the System.String object will make unpinned and unerased copies. That's why this isn't built into SecureString. – Ben Voigt Nov 8 '19 at 19:13
  • Nice, though to zero out the entire string you'll have to use new char[length] (or multiply length with sizeof(char)). – mklement0 Mar 9 at 20:18
  • @BenVoigt: As long as the action delegate doesn't create copies of the temporary, pinned, then zeroed-out string, this approach should be as safe as or unsafe as SecureString itself - to use the latter, a plain-text representation too has to be created at some point, given that secure strings aren't OS-level constructs; the relative security comes from controlling the lifetime of that string and ensuring that it gets erased after use. – mklement0 Mar 9 at 20:22
  • @mklement0: SecureString doesn't have member functions and overloaded operators that make copies all over the place. System.String does. – Ben Voigt Mar 9 at 21:44
  • 1
    @mklement0: Which is pretty darn absurd considering that it passes it to the NetworkCredential constructor which DOES accept a SecureString. – Ben Voigt Mar 9 at 22:32
0
0

This C# code is what you want.

%ProjectPath%/SecureStringsEasy.cs

using System;
using System.Security;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
namespace SecureStringsEasy
{
    public static class MyExtensions
    {
        public static SecureString ToSecureString(string input)
        {
            SecureString secureString = new SecureString();
            foreach (var item in input)
            {
                secureString.AppendChar(item);
            }
            return secureString;
        }
        public static string ToNormalString(SecureString input)
        {
            IntPtr strptr = Marshal.SecureStringToBSTR(input);
            string normal = Marshal.PtrToStringBSTR(strptr);
            Marshal.ZeroFreeBSTR(strptr);
            return normal;
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0
0

I derived from This answer by sclarke81. I like his answer and I'm using the derivative but sclarke81's has a bug. I don't have reputation so I can't comment. The problem seems small enough that it didn't warrant another answer and I could edit it. So I did. It got rejected. So now we have another answer.

sclarke81 I hope you see this (in finally):

Marshal.Copy(new byte[length], 0, insecureStringPointer, length);

should be:

Marshal.Copy(new byte[length * 2], 0, insecureStringPointer, length * 2);

And the full answer with the bug fix:


    /// 
    /// Allows a decrypted secure string to be used whilst minimising the exposure of the
    /// unencrypted string.
    /// 
    /// Generic type returned by Func delegate.
    /// The string to decrypt.
    /// 
    /// Func delegate which will receive the decrypted password as a string object
    /// 
    /// Result of Func delegate
    /// 
    /// This method creates an empty managed string and pins it so that the garbage collector
    /// cannot move it around and create copies. An unmanaged copy of the the secure string is
    /// then created and copied into the managed string. The action is then called using the
    /// managed string. Both the managed and unmanaged strings are then zeroed to erase their
    /// contents. The managed string is unpinned so that the garbage collector can resume normal
    /// behaviour and the unmanaged string is freed.
    /// 
    public static T UseDecryptedSecureString(this SecureString secureString, Func action)
    {
        int length = secureString.Length;
        IntPtr sourceStringPointer = IntPtr.Zero;

        // Create an empty string of the correct size and pin it so that the GC can't move it around.
        string insecureString = new string('\0', length);
        var insecureStringHandler = GCHandle.Alloc(insecureString, GCHandleType.Pinned);

        IntPtr insecureStringPointer = insecureStringHandler.AddrOfPinnedObject();

        try
        {
            // Create an unmanaged copy of the secure string.
            sourceStringPointer = Marshal.SecureStringToBSTR(secureString);

            // Use the pointers to copy from the unmanaged to managed string.
            for (int i = 0; i < secureString.Length; i++)
            {
                short unicodeChar = Marshal.ReadInt16(sourceStringPointer, i * 2);
                Marshal.WriteInt16(insecureStringPointer, i * 2, unicodeChar);
            }

            return action(insecureString);
        }
        finally
        {
            // Zero the managed string so that the string is erased. Then unpin it to allow the
            // GC to take over.
            Marshal.Copy(new byte[length * 2], 0, insecureStringPointer, length * 2);
            insecureStringHandler.Free();

            // Zero and free the unmanaged string.
            Marshal.ZeroFreeBSTR(sourceStringPointer);
        }
    }

    /// 
    /// Allows a decrypted secure string to be used whilst minimising the exposure of the
    /// unencrypted string.
    /// 
    /// The string to decrypt.
    /// 
    /// Func delegate which will receive the decrypted password as a string object
    /// 
    /// Result of Func delegate
    /// 
    /// This method creates an empty managed string and pins it so that the garbage collector
    /// cannot move it around and create copies. An unmanaged copy of the the secure string is
    /// then created and copied into the managed string. The action is then called using the
    /// managed string. Both the managed and unmanaged strings are then zeroed to erase their
    /// contents. The managed string is unpinned so that the garbage collector can resume normal
    /// behaviour and the unmanaged string is freed.
    /// 
    public static void UseDecryptedSecureString(this SecureString secureString, Action action)
    {
        UseDecryptedSecureString(secureString, (s) =>
        {
            action(s);
            return 0;
        });
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Good point; I've left a comment on the referenced answer, which should notify the OP. – mklement0 Mar 9 at 20:46
0
0

Final working solution according to sclarke81 solution and John Flaherty fixes is:

    public static class Utils
    {
        /// <remarks>
        /// This method creates an empty managed string and pins it so that the garbage collector
        /// cannot move it around and create copies. An unmanaged copy of the the secure string is
        /// then created and copied into the managed string. The action is then called using the
        /// managed string. Both the managed and unmanaged strings are then zeroed to erase their
        /// contents. The managed string is unpinned so that the garbage collector can resume normal
        /// behaviour and the unmanaged string is freed.
        /// </remarks>
        public static T UseDecryptedSecureString<T>(this SecureString secureString, Func<string, T> action)
        {
            int length = secureString.Length;
            IntPtr sourceStringPointer = IntPtr.Zero;

            // Create an empty string of the correct size and pin it so that the GC can't move it around.
            string insecureString = new string('\0', length);
            var insecureStringHandler = GCHandle.Alloc(insecureString, GCHandleType.Pinned);

            IntPtr insecureStringPointer = insecureStringHandler.AddrOfPinnedObject();

            try
            {
                // Create an unmanaged copy of the secure string.
                sourceStringPointer = Marshal.SecureStringToBSTR(secureString);

                // Use the pointers to copy from the unmanaged to managed string.
                for (int i = 0; i < secureString.Length; i++)
                {
                    short unicodeChar = Marshal.ReadInt16(sourceStringPointer, i * 2);
                    Marshal.WriteInt16(insecureStringPointer, i * 2, unicodeChar);
                }

                return action(insecureString);
            }
            finally
            {
                // Zero the managed string so that the string is erased. Then unpin it to allow the
                // GC to take over.
                Marshal.Copy(new byte[length * 2], 0, insecureStringPointer, length * 2);
                insecureStringHandler.Free();

                // Zero and free the unmanaged string.
                Marshal.ZeroFreeBSTR(sourceStringPointer);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Allows a decrypted secure string to be used whilst minimising the exposure of the
        /// unencrypted string.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="secureString">The string to decrypt.</param>
        /// <param name="action">
        /// Func delegate which will receive the decrypted password as a string object
        /// </param>
        /// <returns>Result of Func delegate</returns>
        /// <remarks>
        /// This method creates an empty managed string and pins it so that the garbage collector
        /// cannot move it around and create copies. An unmanaged copy of the the secure string is
        /// then created and copied into the managed string. The action is then called using the
        /// managed string. Both the managed and unmanaged strings are then zeroed to erase their
        /// contents. The managed string is unpinned so that the garbage collector can resume normal
        /// behaviour and the unmanaged string is freed.
        /// </remarks>
        public static void UseDecryptedSecureString(this SecureString secureString, Action<string> action)
        {
            UseDecryptedSecureString(secureString, (s) =>
            {
                action(s);
                return 0;
            });
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
-5
0
// using so that Marshal doesn't have to be qualified
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;    
//using for SecureString
using System.Security;
public string DecodeSecureString (SecureString Convert) 
{
    //convert to IntPtr using Marshal
    IntPtr cvttmpst = Marshal.SecureStringToBSTR(Convert);
    //convert to string using Marshal
    string cvtPlainPassword = Marshal.PtrToStringAuto(cvttmpst);
    //return the now plain string
    return cvtPlainPassword;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This answer has a memory leak. – Ben Voigt Sep 8 '15 at 22:15
  • @BenVoigt Can you explain further please how this has a memory leak? – El Ronnoco Jun 21 '16 at 15:47
  • 4
    @ElRonnoco: Nothing frees the BSTR explicitly, and it's not a .NET object so the garbage collector doesn't take care of it either. Compare to stackoverflow.com/a/818709/103167 which was posted 5 years earlier and doesn't leak. – Ben Voigt Jun 21 '16 at 16:18
  • This answer does not work on non windows platforms. PtrToStringAuto is wrong for an explanation see: github.com/PowerShell/PowerShell/issues/… – K. Frank Mar 14 at 16:47
-5
0

If you use a StringBuilder instead of a string, you can overwrite the actual value in memory when you are done. That way the password won't hang around in memory until garbage collection picks it up.

StringBuilder.Append(plainTextPassword);
StringBuilder.Clear();
// overwrite with reasonably random characters
StringBuilder.Append(New Guid().ToString());
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    While this is true, the garbage collector may still move the StringBuilder buffer around in memory during generational compaction, which makes the "overwrite the actual value" fail, because there is another (or more) leftover copy that isn't destroyed. – Ben Voigt Jun 21 '16 at 16:20
  • 4
    This doesn't even remotely answer the question. – Jay Sullivan Aug 10 '16 at 2:50

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