Given an ip address (say 192.168.0.1), how do I check if it's in a network (say 192.168.0.0/24) in Python?

Are there general tools in Python for ip address manipulation? Stuff like host lookups, ip adddress to int, network address with netmask to int and so on? Hopefully in the standard Python library for 2.5.

25 Answers 25

up vote 33 down vote accepted

This article shows you can do it with socket and struct modules without too much extra effort. I added a little to the article as follows:

import socket,struct

def makeMask(n):
    "return a mask of n bits as a long integer"
    return (2L<<n-1) - 1

def dottedQuadToNum(ip):
    "convert decimal dotted quad string to long integer"
    return struct.unpack('L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]

def networkMask(ip,bits):
    "Convert a network address to a long integer" 
    return dottedQuadToNum(ip) & makeMask(bits)

def addressInNetwork(ip,net):
   "Is an address in a network"
   return ip & net == net

address = dottedQuadToNum("192.168.1.1")
networka = networkMask("10.0.0.0",24)
networkb = networkMask("192.168.0.0",24)
print (address,networka,networkb)
print addressInNetwork(address,networka)
print addressInNetwork(address,networkb)

This outputs:

False
True

If you just want a single function that takes strings it would look like this:

import socket,struct

def addressInNetwork(ip,net):
   "Is an address in a network"
   ipaddr = struct.unpack('L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]
   netaddr,bits = net.split('/')
   netmask = struct.unpack('L',socket.inet_aton(netaddr))[0] & ((2L<<int(bits)-1) - 1)
   return ipaddr & netmask == netmask
  • 3
    I guess there might be big and little endian problems here, but since both network and ip address resolution happens on the same computer, both number should have the same error and at least be in the same endian order. – Staale May 4 '09 at 9:38
  • 7
    Additionally, struct.unpack('L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0] will fail on architectures where 'L' unpacks to something different than 4 bytes, regardless of endianness. – Rafał Dowgird May 4 '09 at 15:33
  • 4
    Continuing on Rafal's comment, to get this to work on a 64-bit Python interpreter, replace the line in question with: return struct.unpack('<L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0] – nitwit Jan 22 '12 at 9:24
  • 9
    I think your solution has a serious bug: addressInNetwork('172.7.1.1', '172.3.0.0/16') -> True (I converted 'L' to '<L' in my 64bit os) – Taha Jahangir Feb 10 '12 at 5:01
  • 13
    CAUTION: This solution has a serious bug: addressInNetwork('172.7.1.1', '172.3.0.0/16') -> True – Taha Jahangir Aug 21 '12 at 5:27

I like to use netaddr for that:

from netaddr import CIDR, IP

if IP("192.168.0.1") in CIDR("192.168.0.0/24"):
    print "Yay!"

As arno_v pointed out in the comments, new version of netaddr does it like this:

from netaddr import IPNetwork, IPAddress
if IPAddress("192.168.0.1") in IPNetwork("192.168.0.0/24"):
    print "Yay!"
  • >>> netaddr.all_matching_cidrs("192.168.0.1", ["192.168.0.0/24","212.11.64.0/19"] ) [IPNetwork('192.168.0.0/24')] – user221014 Sep 6 '11 at 17:25
  • 14
    Or in the new version: from netaddr import IPNetwork, IPAddress IPAddress("192.168.0.1") in IPNetwork("192.168.0.0/24") – arno_v Feb 13 '13 at 12:37
  • 1
    This answer is beautiful. You sir have won the internet for the day. – ojblass Mar 2 '17 at 13:16

Using ipaddress (in the stdlib since 3.3, at PyPi for 2.6/2.7):

>>> import ipaddress
>>> ipaddress.ip_address('192.168.0.1') in ipaddress.ip_network('192.168.0.0/24')
True

If you want to evaluate a lot of IP addresses this way, you'll probably want to calculate the netmask upfront, like

n = ipaddress.ip_network('192.0.0.0/16')
netw = int(n.network_address)
mask = int(n.netmask)

Then, for each address, calculate the binary representation with one of

a = int(ipaddress.ip_address('192.0.43.10'))
a = struct.unpack('!I', socket.inet_pton(socket.AF_INET, '192.0.43.10'))[0]
a = struct.unpack('!I', socket.inet_aton('192.0.43.10'))[0]  # IPv4 only

Finally, you can simply check:

in_network = (a & mask) == netw
  • 4
    ipaddr is no longer part of python stdlib (added in 2.7a1, 3.1b1; removed in 2.7a1, 3.1rc2) – mykhal Mar 31 '10 at 13:11
  • 2
    Beware, python-ipaddr behaved quite slow for us, so it may be unsuitable for some cases where a lot of comparsions are required frequently. YMMV, so benchmark yourself. – drdaeman Jun 6 '12 at 13:07
  • 5
    Updated to ipaddress, which is in the 3.3 stdlib. – phihag Sep 24 '12 at 10:40
  • 3
    @drdaeman Added a faster version. – phihag Nov 30 '12 at 18:51
  • There's also a port of the ipaddress module to 2.6 and 2.7 in pypi: pypi.python.org/pypi/ipaddress – sah Jul 3 '13 at 0:59

This code is working for me on Linux x86. I haven't really given any thought to endianess issues, but I have tested it against the "ipaddr" module using over 200K IP addresses tested against 8 different network strings, and the results of ipaddr are the same as this code.

def addressInNetwork(ip, net):
   import socket,struct
   ipaddr = int(''.join([ '%02x' % int(x) for x in ip.split('.') ]), 16)
   netstr, bits = net.split('/')
   netaddr = int(''.join([ '%02x' % int(x) for x in netstr.split('.') ]), 16)
   mask = (0xffffffff << (32 - int(bits))) & 0xffffffff
   return (ipaddr & mask) == (netaddr & mask)

Example:

>>> print addressInNetwork('10.9.8.7', '10.9.1.0/16')
True
>>> print addressInNetwork('10.9.8.7', '10.9.1.0/24')
False
  • Nice and fast. No need for a library for a few simple logic operations. – Chris Koston Jun 7 at 13:25

I tried Dave Webb's solution but hit some problems:

Most fundamentally - a match should be checked by ANDing the IP address with the mask, then checking the result matched the Network address exactly. Not ANDing the IP address with the Network address as was done.

I also noticed that just ignoring the Endian behaviour assuming that consistency will save you will only work for masks on octet boundaries (/24, /16). In order to get other masks (/23, /21) working correctly I added a "greater than" to the struct commands and changed the code for creating the binary mask to start with all "1" and shift left by (32-mask).

Finally, I added a simple check that the network address is valid for the mask and just print a warning if it is not.

Here's the result:

def addressInNetwork(ip,net):
    "Is an address in a network"
    ipaddr = struct.unpack('>L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]
    netaddr,bits = net.split('/')
    netmask = struct.unpack('>L',socket.inet_aton(netaddr))[0]
    ipaddr_masked = ipaddr & (4294967295<<(32-int(bits)))   # Logical AND of IP address and mask will equal the network address if it matches
    if netmask == netmask & (4294967295<<(32-int(bits))):   # Validate network address is valid for mask
            return ipaddr_masked == netmask
    else:
            print "***WARNING*** Network",netaddr,"not valid with mask /"+bits
            return ipaddr_masked == netmask
  • This appears to work reliably on 64-bit ('L' fails as the value is 32-bit) and returns the values in a sensible order (ipaddr will be 0xC0A80001 for 192.168.0.1). It also copes with "192.168.0.1/24" as a netmask for "192.168.0.1" (not standard, but possible and easily correctable) – IBBoard Oct 26 '12 at 13:09
  • Works perfectly on Python 2.4 – xlash Mar 7 '16 at 12:18

I'm not a fan of using modules when they are not needed. This job only requires simple math, so here is my simple function to do the job:

def ipToInt(ip):
    o = map(int, ip.split('.'))
    res = (16777216 * o[0]) + (65536 * o[1]) + (256 * o[2]) + o[3]
    return res

def isIpInSubnet(ip, ipNetwork, maskLength):
    ipInt = ipToInt(ip)#my test ip, in int form

    maskLengthFromRight = 32 - maskLength

    ipNetworkInt = ipToInt(ipNetwork) #convert the ip network into integer form
    binString = "{0:b}".format(ipNetworkInt) #convert that into into binary (string format)

    chopAmount = 0 #find out how much of that int I need to cut off
    for i in range(maskLengthFromRight):
        if i < len(binString):
            chopAmount += int(binString[len(binString)-1-i]) * 2**i

    minVal = ipNetworkInt-chopAmount
    maxVal = minVal+2**maskLengthFromRight -1

    return minVal <= ipInt and ipInt <= maxVal

Then to use it:

>>> print isIpInSubnet('66.151.97.0', '66.151.97.192',24) 
True
>>> print isIpInSubnet('66.151.97.193', '66.151.97.192',29) 
True
>>> print isIpInSubnet('66.151.96.0', '66.151.97.192',24) 
False
>>> print isIpInSubnet('66.151.97.0', '66.151.97.192',29) 

That's it, this is much faster than the solutions above with the included modules.

  • {TypeError}'map' object is not subscriptable. You need a o = list(o) after o = map(int, ip.split('.')) – gies0r Mar 16 '17 at 12:03

The accepted answer doesn't work ... which is making me angry. Mask is backwards and doesn't work with any bits that are not a simple 8 bit block (eg /24). I adapted the answer, and it works nicely.

    import socket,struct

    def addressInNetwork(ip, net_n_bits):  
      ipaddr = struct.unpack('!L', socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]
      net, bits = net_n_bits.split('/')
      netaddr = struct.unpack('!L', socket.inet_aton(net))[0]
      netmask = (0xFFFFFFFF >> int(bits)) ^ 0xFFFFFFFF
      return ipaddr & netmask == netaddr

here is a function that returns a dotted binary string to help visualize the masking.. kind of like ipcalc output.

    def bb(i):
     def s = '{:032b}'.format(i)
     def return s[0:8]+"."+s[8:16]+"."+s[16:24]+"."+s[24:32]

eg:

screen shot of python

Marc's code is nearly correct. A complete version of the code is -

def addressInNetwork3(ip,net):
    '''This function allows you to check if on IP belogs to a Network'''
    ipaddr = struct.unpack('=L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]
    netaddr,bits = net.split('/')
    netmask = struct.unpack('=L',socket.inet_aton(calcDottedNetmask(int(bits))))[0]
    network = struct.unpack('=L',socket.inet_aton(netaddr))[0] & netmask
    return (ipaddr & netmask) == (network & netmask)

def calcDottedNetmask(mask):
    bits = 0
    for i in xrange(32-mask,32):
        bits |= (1 << i)
    return "%d.%d.%d.%d" % ((bits & 0xff000000) >> 24, (bits & 0xff0000) >> 16, (bits & 0xff00) >> 8 , (bits & 0xff))

Obviously from the same sources as above...

A very Important note is that the first code has a small glitch - The IP address 255.255.255.255 also shows up as a Valid IP for any subnet. I had a heck of time getting this code to work and thanks to Marc for the correct answer.

  • Tried and tested. From all the socket/struct examples on this page this is the only correct one – Zabuzzman Aug 7 '15 at 21:39

Not in the Standard library for 2.5, but ipaddr makes this very easy. I believe it is in 3.3 under the name ipaddress.

import ipaddr

a = ipaddr.IPAddress('192.168.0.1')
n = ipaddr.IPNetwork('192.168.0.0/24')

#This will return True
n.Contains(a)
  • This is by far my favorite out of all the myriad choices here (at time of comment, 2017). Thanks! – rsaw Mar 11 '17 at 3:39

For python3

In [64]: ipaddress.IPv4Address('192.168.1.1') in ipaddress.IPv4Network('192.168.0.0/24')
Out[64]: False

from netaddr import all_matching_cidrs

>>> from netaddr import all_matching_cidrs
>>> all_matching_cidrs("212.11.70.34", ["192.168.0.0/24","212.11.64.0/19"] )
[IPNetwork('212.11.64.0/19')]

Here is the usage for this method:

>>> help(all_matching_cidrs)

Help on function all_matching_cidrs in module netaddr.ip:

all_matching_cidrs(ip, cidrs)
    Matches an IP address or subnet against a given sequence of IP addresses and subnets.

    @param ip: a single IP address or subnet.

    @param cidrs: a sequence of IP addresses and/or subnets.

    @return: all matching IPAddress and/or IPNetwork objects from the provided
    sequence, an empty list if there was no match.

Basically you provide an ip address as the first argument and a list of cidrs as the second argument. A list of hits are returned.

#This works properly without the weird byte by byte handling
def addressInNetwork(ip,net):
    '''Is an address in a network'''
    # Convert addresses to host order, so shifts actually make sense
    ip = struct.unpack('>L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]
    netaddr,bits = net.split('/')
    netaddr = struct.unpack('>L',socket.inet_aton(netaddr))[0]
    # Must shift left an all ones value, /32 = zero shift, /0 = 32 shift left
    netmask = (0xffffffff << (32-int(bits))) & 0xffffffff
    # There's no need to mask the network address, as long as its a proper network address
    return (ip & netmask) == netaddr 
  • The code did not work correctly on 64-bit OS, because of incorrect netmask values. I've taken a liberty to fix that. – drdaeman Jun 6 '12 at 13:03

The choosen answer has a bug.

Following is the correct code:

def addressInNetwork(ip, net_n_bits):
   ipaddr = struct.unpack('<L', socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]
   net, bits = net_n_bits.split('/')
   netaddr = struct.unpack('<L', socket.inet_aton(net))[0]
   netmask = ((1L << int(bits)) - 1)
   return ipaddr & netmask == netaddr & netmask

Note: ipaddr & netmask == netaddr & netmask instead of ipaddr & netmask == netmask.

I also replace ((2L<<int(bits)-1) - 1) with ((1L << int(bits)) - 1), as the latter seems more understandable.

  • I think the mask conversion ((2L<<int(bits)-1) - 1) is correct. e.g. if the mask is 16, it should be "255.255.0.0" or 65535L, but ((1L << int(bits)) - 1) will get 32767L, which is not right. – Chris.Q Apr 1 '15 at 23:11
  • @Chris.Q, ((1L << int(bits)) - 1) gives 65535L on my system, with bits set to 16!! – Debanshu Kundu Apr 7 '15 at 14:19
  • Also, for bits set to 0, ((2L<<int(bits)-1) - 1) is raising error. – Debanshu Kundu Apr 7 '15 at 14:25
  • Not working.... – Zabuzzman Aug 7 '15 at 21:39
  • 1
    Not working for /28 – xlash Mar 7 '16 at 12:09

Here is a class I wrote for longest prefix matching:

#!/usr/bin/env python

class Node:
def __init__(self):
    self.left_child = None
    self.right_child = None
    self.data = "-"

def setData(self, data): self.data = data
def setLeft(self, pointer): self.left_child = pointer
def setRight(self, pointer): self.right_child = pointer
def getData(self): return self.data
def getLeft(self): return self.left_child
def getRight(self): return self.right_child

def __str__(self):
        return "LC: %s RC: %s data: %s" % (self.left_child, self.right_child, self.data)


class LPMTrie:      

def __init__(self):
    self.nodes = [Node()]
    self.curr_node_ind = 0

def addPrefix(self, prefix):
    self.curr_node_ind = 0
    prefix_bits = ''.join([bin(int(x)+256)[3:] for x in prefix.split('/')[0].split('.')])
    prefix_length = int(prefix.split('/')[1])
    for i in xrange(0, prefix_length):
        if (prefix_bits[i] == '1'):
            if (self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getRight()):
                self.curr_node_ind = self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getRight()
            else:
                tmp = Node()
                self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].setRight(len(self.nodes))
                tmp.setData(self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getData());
                self.curr_node_ind = len(self.nodes)
                self.nodes.append(tmp)
        else:
            if (self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getLeft()):
                self.curr_node_ind = self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getLeft()
            else:
                tmp = Node()
                self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].setLeft(len(self.nodes))
                tmp.setData(self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getData());
                self.curr_node_ind = len(self.nodes)
                self.nodes.append(tmp)

        if i == prefix_length - 1 :
            self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].setData(prefix)

def searchPrefix(self, ip):
    self.curr_node_ind = 0
    ip_bits = ''.join([bin(int(x)+256)[3:] for x in ip.split('.')])
    for i in xrange(0, 32):
        if (ip_bits[i] == '1'):
            if (self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getRight()):
                self.curr_node_ind = self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getRight()
            else:
                return self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getData()
        else:
            if (self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getLeft()):
                self.curr_node_ind = self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getLeft()
            else:
                return self.nodes[self.curr_node_ind].getData()

    return None

def triePrint(self):
    n = 1
    for i in self.nodes:
        print n, ':'
        print i
        n += 1

And here is a test program:

n=LPMTrie()
n.addPrefix('10.25.63.0/24')
n.addPrefix('10.25.63.0/16')
n.addPrefix('100.25.63.2/8')
n.addPrefix('100.25.0.3/16')
print n.searchPrefix('10.25.63.152')
print n.searchPrefix('100.25.63.200')
#10.25.63.0/24
#100.25.0.3/16

Relying on the "struct" module can cause problems with endian-ness and type sizes, and just isn't needed. Nor is socket.inet_aton(). Python works very well with dotted-quad IP addresses:

def ip_to_u32(ip):
  return int(''.join('%02x' % int(d) for d in ip.split('.')), 16)

I need to do IP matching on each socket accept() call, against a whole set of allowable source networks, so I precompute masks and networks, as integers:

SNS_SOURCES = [
  # US-EAST-1
  '207.171.167.101',
  '207.171.167.25',
  '207.171.167.26',
  '207.171.172.6',
  '54.239.98.0/24',
  '54.240.217.16/29',
  '54.240.217.8/29',
  '54.240.217.64/28',
  '54.240.217.80/29',
  '72.21.196.64/29',
  '72.21.198.64/29',
  '72.21.198.72',
  '72.21.217.0/24',
  ]

def build_masks():
  masks = [ ]
  for cidr in SNS_SOURCES:
    if '/' in cidr:
      netstr, bits = cidr.split('/')
      mask = (0xffffffff << (32 - int(bits))) & 0xffffffff
      net = ip_to_u32(netstr) & mask
    else:
      mask = 0xffffffff
      net = ip_to_u32(cidr)
    masks.append((mask, net))
  return masks

Then I can quickly see if a given IP is within one of those networks:

ip = ip_to_u32(ipstr)
for mask, net in cached_masks:
  if ip & mask == net:
    # matched!
    break
else:
  raise BadClientIP(ipstr)

No module imports needed, and the code is very fast at matching.

  • Very good solution! Thanks for that! – francisaugusto Sep 6 at 14:56

Thank you for your script!
I have work quite a long on it to make everything working... So I'm sharing it here

  • Using netaddr Class is 10 times slower than using binary conversion, so if you'd like to use it on a big list of IP, you should consider not using netaddr class
  • makeMask function is not working! Only working for /8,/16,/24
    Ex:

    bits = "21" ; socket.inet_ntoa(struct.pack('=L',(2L << int(bits)-1) - 1))
    '255.255.31.0' whereas it should be 255.255.248.0

    So I have used another function calcDottedNetmask(mask) from http://code.activestate.com/recipes/576483-convert-subnetmask-from-cidr-notation-to-dotdecima/
    Ex:


#!/usr/bin/python
>>> calcDottedNetmask(21)
>>> '255.255.248.0'
  • Another problem is the process of matching if an IP belongs to a network! Basic Operation should be to compare (ipaddr & netmask) and (network & netmask).
    Ex: for the time being, the function is wrong

#!/usr/bin/python
>>> addressInNetwork('188.104.8.64','172.16.0.0/12')
>>>True which is completely WRONG!!

So my new addressInNetwork function looks-like:


#!/usr/bin/python
import socket,struct
def addressInNetwork(ip,net):
    '''This function allows you to check if on IP belogs to a Network'''
    ipaddr = struct.unpack('=L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]
    netaddr,bits = net.split('/')
    netmask = struct.unpack('=L',socket.inet_aton(calcDottedNetmask(bits)))[0]
    network = struct.unpack('=L',socket.inet_aton(netaddr))[0] & netmask
    return (ipaddr & netmask) == (network & netmask)

def calcDottedNetmask(mask):
    bits = 0
    for i in xrange(32-int(mask),32):
        bits |= (1 > 24, (bits & 0xff0000) >> 16, (bits & 0xff00) >> 8 , (bits & 0xff))


And now, answer is right!!


#!/usr/bin/python
>>> addressInNetwork('188.104.8.64','172.16.0.0/12')
False

I hope that it will help other people, saving time for them!

  • 1
    the current version of the above code gives a traceback in the last line, that you can "|=" an int and a tuple. – Sean Reifschneider Dec 16 '10 at 20:14

Relating to all of the above, I think socket.inet_aton() returns bytes in network order, so the correct way to unpack them is probably

struct.unpack('!L', ... )

previous solution have a bug in ip & net == net. Correct ip lookup is ip & netmask = net

bugfixed code:

import socket
import struct

def makeMask(n):
    "return a mask of n bits as a long integer"
    return (2L<<n-1) - 1

def dottedQuadToNum(ip):
    "convert decimal dotted quad string to long integer"
    return struct.unpack('L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]

def addressInNetwork(ip,net,netmask):
   "Is an address in a network"
   print "IP "+str(ip) + " NET "+str(net) + " MASK "+str(netmask)+" AND "+str(ip & netmask)
   return ip & netmask == net

def humannetcheck(ip,net):
        address=dottedQuadToNum(ip)
        netaddr=dottedQuadToNum(net.split("/")[0])
        netmask=makeMask(long(net.split("/")[1]))
        return addressInNetwork(address,netaddr,netmask)


print humannetcheck("192.168.0.1","192.168.0.0/24");
print humannetcheck("192.169.0.1","192.168.0.0/24");

There is an API that's called SubnetTree available in python that do this job very well. This is a simple example :

import SubnetTree
t = SubnetTree.SubnetTree()
t.insert("10.0.1.3/32")
print("10.0.1.3" in t)

This is the link

import socket,struct
def addressInNetwork(ip,net):
    "Is an address in a network"
    ipaddr = struct.unpack('!L',socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]
    netaddr,bits = net.split('/')
    netaddr = struct.unpack('!L',socket.inet_aton(netaddr))[0]
    netmask = ((1<<(32-int(bits))) - 1)^0xffffffff
    return ipaddr & netmask == netaddr & netmask
print addressInNetwork('10.10.10.110','10.10.10.128/25')
print addressInNetwork('10.10.10.110','10.10.10.0/25')
print addressInNetwork('10.10.10.110','10.20.10.128/25')

$ python check-subnet.py
False
True
False

  • Can you explain what are you adding to the already given answers? – David Guyon Feb 17 '16 at 15:12
  • The given answers has some problem, which could not handle CIDR. I just changed the byte order of the IP address. Just like this: >>> struct.unpack('!L',socket.inet_aton('10.10.10.110'))[0] 168430190 >>> socket.inet_ntoa(struct.pack('!L', 168430190)) '10.10.10.110' – Johnson Feb 18 '16 at 0:35
  • 1
    Thanks for the answer. I guess it's something you should add to your answer to clarify. It's in the StackOverflow's spirit to explain the "what" "why" and finally "how". Your answer only contains the "how" :(. I let you complete your answer by editing it ;). – David Guyon Feb 18 '16 at 13:30

I don't know of anything in the standard library, but PySubnetTree is a Python library that will do subnet matching.

From various sources above, and from my own research, this is how I got subnet and address calculation working. These pieces are enough to solve the question and other related questions.

class iptools:
    @staticmethod
    def dottedQuadToNum(ip):
        "convert decimal dotted quad string to long integer"
        return struct.unpack('>L', socket.inet_aton(ip))[0]

    @staticmethod
    def numToDottedQuad(n):
        "convert long int to dotted quad string"
        return socket.inet_ntoa(struct.pack('>L', n))

    @staticmethod
    def makeNetmask(mask):
        bits = 0
        for i in xrange(32-int(mask), 32):
            bits |= (1 << i)
        return bits

    @staticmethod
    def ipToNetAndHost(ip, maskbits):
        "returns tuple (network, host) dotted-quad addresses given"
        " IP and mask size"
        # (by Greg Jorgensen)
        n = iptools.dottedQuadToNum(ip)
        m = iptools.makeMask(maskbits)
        net = n & m
        host = n - mask
        return iptools.numToDottedQuad(net), iptools.numToDottedQuad(host)

Here is my code

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import socket


class SubnetTest(object):
    def __init__(self, network):
        self.network, self.netmask = network.split('/')
        self._network_int = int(socket.inet_aton(self.network).encode('hex'), 16)
        self._mask = ((1L << int(self.netmask)) - 1) << (32 - int(self.netmask))
        self._net_prefix = self._network_int & self._mask

    def match(self, ip):
        '''
        判断传入的 IP 是不是本 Network 内的 IP
        '''
        ip_int = int(socket.inet_aton(ip).encode('hex'), 16)
        return (ip_int & self._mask) == self._net_prefix

st = SubnetTest('100.98.21.0/24')
print st.match('100.98.23.32')

If you do not want to import other modules you could go with:

def ip_matches_network(self, network, ip):
    """
    '{:08b}'.format(254): Converts 254 in a string of its binary representation

    ip_bits[:net_mask] == net_ip_bits[:net_mask]: compare the ip bit streams

    :param network: string like '192.168.33.0/24'
    :param ip: string like '192.168.33.1'
    :return: if ip matches network
    """
    net_ip, net_mask = network.split('/')
    net_mask = int(net_mask)
    ip_bits = ''.join('{:08b}'.format(int(x)) for x in ip.split('.'))
    net_ip_bits = ''.join('{:08b}'.format(int(x)) for x in net_ip.split('.'))
    # example: net_mask=24 -> compare strings at position 0 to 23
    return ip_bits[:net_mask] == net_ip_bits[:net_mask]

I tried one subset of proposed solutions in these answers.. with no success, I finally adapted and fixed the proposed code and wrote my fixed function.

I tested it and works at least on little endian architectures--e.g.x86-- if anyone likes to try on a big endian architecture, please give me feedback.

IP2Int code comes from this post, the other method is a fully (for my test cases) working fix of previous proposals in this question.

The code:

def IP2Int(ip):
    o = map(int, ip.split('.'))
    res = (16777216 * o[0]) + (65536 * o[1]) + (256 * o[2]) + o[3]
    return res


def addressInNetwork(ip, net_n_bits):
    ipaddr = IP2Int(ip)
    net, bits = net_n_bits.split('/')
    netaddr = IP2Int(net)
    bits_num = int(bits)
    netmask = ((1L << bits_num) - 1) << (32 - bits_num)
    return ipaddr & netmask == netaddr & netmask

Hope useful,

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