1

I am pretty new to ruby and have a very simple ruby script that has the following purpose:

  1. Read lines of file
  2. Access jira instance using jira4r gem
  3. Query jira instance for issue(s)
  4. Create a directory using the issue key and issue summary

I've come to the conclusion after some tinkering that the Dir.mkdir command does not accept the object I am passing it as argument.

Findings:

  1. If Dir.mkdir is passed a line, #{chompline}, from my textfile directory creation execute properly.

  2. If Dir.mkdir is passed a string consisting of issue.key and issue.summary it chokes with the following error:

./readFile.rb:29:in `mkdir': No such file or directory - (Errno::ENOENT) from ./readFile.rb:29

  1. Based on point #1 and #2, it must be something about the string I create from issue key and summary.

I have the following theories/questions:

  1. Is "#{keyPlusSummary}"the correct object type to pass into mkdir as argument ? I believe it to be string, but perhaps I am assuming incorrectly.

Source:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
require 'rubygems'
require 'jira4r'
require 'FileUtils'
jira = Jira4R::JiraTool.new(2, "http://jira.somejirainstance.com")
baseurl = jira.getServerInfo().baseUrl
puts "Base URL: " + baseurl , "\n"
jira.login("someUser", "somePassword")



file = File.new("awkOutput.txt", "r")
while (line = file.gets)
  chompline = "#{line}".chomp!
  issue = jira.getIssue("#{chompline}")
  keyPlusSummary = "#{issue.key}"+"#{issue.summary}"
  puts keyPlusSummary
  Dir.mkdir "#{keyPlusSummary}"
end
file.close
3
  • Does system("mkdir #{keyPlusSummary.to_s}") work? Nov 20, 2011 at 3:57
  • system("mkdir #{keyPlusSummary.to_s}") makes creates multiple directories for each issue.key + issue.summary. For instance if string was "a b", the above creates two dirs : a and b. I think I need to properly escape the spaces. Yes ? Nov 20, 2011 at 4:10
  • Try system("mkdir #{keyPlusSummary.to_s.gsub(' ', '\ ')}") Nov 20, 2011 at 5:31

2 Answers 2

1

It's a string, but you don't tell us what's in it.

# More canonical, both in var naming, and there's
# no need for concatenation in this case.
dir_name = "#{issue.key}#{issue.summary}"

Are you making the string "directory-name friendly"?

I would not use a JIRA issue summary as a directory name; IMO just the project/issue # would be enough. If you do use the summary, make it something that's directory-friendly by stripping out anything non-alphanumeric, and replacing spaces with underscores.

8
  • 1
    Yes, the string should be directory friendly. Here's an example of the first string from the issue.key + issue.summary. FDB-1814Hybrid Translator/Renderer 1. Spaces are legal characters, yet you suggest replacing spaces. Do I need to escape them with \ similar to the shell ? I plan to add a gsub! to the code in order that non-friendly characters are replaced. Using the jira summary should be ok in this case due to our naming schema for issues. Nov 20, 2011 at 4:01
  • 2
    @blackberryoctopus Oh, please don't use a / as part of a single directory name :( That's why your call fails, because it's treating it like a path separator, which is as it should be. Also, why not use JIRA components to specify issue hierarchy rather than embedding in the summary? Nov 20, 2011 at 4:23
  • Hi Dave, Ok, I can do a gsub! on the string and replace the '/'. That seems reasonable and less problematic moving forward. I don't understand what you mean by this: "JIRA components to specify issue hierarchy rather than embedding in the summary?" Nov 20, 2011 at 4:44
  • @blackberryoctopus It looks like you're embedding issue hierarchy metadata in the issue summary rather than using JIRA mechanisms. Nov 20, 2011 at 4:46
  • are you referring to the usage of custom fields that would help to classify issues in a more structured way ? Nov 20, 2011 at 4:47
1

keyPlusSummary is a string, so it is of the right type. What may be the problem is slashes in the string. Like mkdir in UNIX, Dir.mkdir will not create parent directories for you, it will only create a single directory. If the key + summary includes a '/', then it will read it as a multi-level directory. You need to either escape the '/', or (better), use FileUtils.mkdir_p, or (best) do cleanup to replace ' ' with '_', and remove special characters that make using the directory harder :)

As an aside, your code doesn't need to have the interpolations it does:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
require 'rubygems'
require 'jira4r'
require 'FileUtils'
jira = Jira4R::JiraTool.new(2, "http://jira.somejirainstance.com")
baseurl = jira.getServerInfo().baseUrl
puts "Base URL: #{baseurl}\n" #use it here!
jira.login("someUser", "somePassword")



File.new("awkOutput.txt", "r") do |file| #using the block form to ensure you close the file
  while (line = file.gets)
    chompline = line.chomp! #line is already a string, no need to interpolate
    issue = jira.getIssue(chompline) #line is already a string, no need
    keyPlusSummary = "#{issue.key}#{issue.summary}" #already interpolating, no need to add
    puts keyPlusSummary
    Dir.mkdir keyPlusSummary #already a string
  end
end
2
  • Hi Jim I actually want the '/' to be part of the directory name. It should be be valid character. Is there a convenience method that autoescapes a string ? Nov 20, 2011 at 4:16
  • @blackberryoctopus: Depending on the operating system/filesystem, several characters are not allowed in path names as they have special meaning. The slash is one of those. Ruby can't "escape" those as it wouldn't know what to do with it. Also, the slash could mean its exact meaning: a path separator. You should thus perform the escaping yourself using str.gsub. Nov 20, 2011 at 17:30

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