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I'm writing a game engine in Java for Android games and my engine handles collision detection for different shapes. Each shape is its own class (Square, Circle, etc.), and derives from a common abstract parent Collidable. I have a physics manager class which basically checks if any of the existing objects in the game are colliding with another, and then does the appropriate action when collision is detected. The check for collision is implemented inside each physics shape child class as in the code below.

public abstract class Collidable
{
}

public class Square extends Collidable
{
    public boolean Collides(Square) {...}
    public boolean Collides(Circle) {...}
    public boolean Collides(Triangle) {...}
}

public class Circle extends Collidable
{
    public boolean Collides(Square) {...}
    public boolean Collides(Circle) {...}
    public boolean Collides(Triangle) {...}
}

public class Triangle extends Collidable
{
    public boolean Collides(Square) {...}
    public boolean Collides(Circle) {...}
    public boolean Collides(Triangle) {...}
}

public class PhysicsMgr
{
    public boolean Collides(Collidable p1, Collidable p2)
    {
        return p1.Collides(p2);
        // This obviously won't work because there is no Collides
        // method in Collidable. I want it to somehow call the child's
        // method and pass in p2 as its child type rather than as
        // a parent. Or somehow do this:
        return (p1.child()).Collides(p2.child());
            // I know that obviously nothing like this exists.
    }
}

I am aware of "instanceof" and really don't want to check the child type of p1 and p2 versus every single collision shape I have. There must be a better way. I'm looking for either a workaround for my current problem, or preferably a redesign of my current collision detection system to avoid this problem altogether.

Thanks!

3

you should read about the visitor pattern

  • 1
    The visitor pattern is definitely the way to go. Declare abstact methods Collides(Square), etc. in Collidable. Also declare an abstract method Collides(Collidable) that in each concrete subclass is implemented as collidable.collides(this). Since this code appears in each concrete subclass, the compiler can figure out which version of collides to call. – Ted Hopp Nov 20 '11 at 7:41
  • @TedHopp i agree, edited the answer. – yurib Nov 20 '11 at 7:44
  • @Ted: Just what I was looking for. Perfect! So (sorry that this is me being lazy and not reading about the visitor pattern to answer this question) if I declare the abstract methods in the parent and then implement them in the concrete subclasses that way, IS that using the visitor pattern? – Andrew Rasmussen Nov 20 '11 at 20:49
  • Sorry to leave you out there yurib, I realize that you basically said the same thing. Thanks to both of you! – Andrew Rasmussen Nov 20 '11 at 20:56
1

For starters, I wouldn't make Collidable an abstract class. Even though there are probably good arguments for it; it just seems to me like this is an "is a" situation where a lot of objects could be collidable.

So, that being said, here is what I would recommend:

// Assuming you're working in 2 dimensions
public class Coordinates {

  public Coordinates(float x, float y) {
     // etc etc etc
  }
}

public interface ICollidable {

  // Using unusually long name to illustrate point,
  // but feel free to rename.
  public int getMaxDistanceFromCenterOfMass(Coordinates unitVector);
  public Coordinates getCenterOfMass();
}

And then, for Square, Triangle, and Circle, I would implement the interface.

public class Square implements ICollidable {

  @Override
  public int getMaxDistanceFromCenterOfMass(Coordinates unitVector) {
    // Must declare and initialize
    return this.lengthOfSide;
  }

  @Override
  public Coordinates getCenterOfMass() {
    return this.centerOfMass;
  }
}

public class Circle implements ICollidable {

  @Override
  public int getMaxDistanceFromCenterOfMass(Coordinates unitVector) {
    // Must declare and initialize
    return this.radius;
  }

  @Override
  public Coordinates getCenterOfMass() {
    return this.centerOfMass;
  }
}

public class Triangle implements ICollidable {

  @Override
  public int getMaxDistanceFromCenterOfMass(Coordinates unitVector) {
    // Must declare and initialize
    return this.lengthOfSide;
  }

  @Override
  public Coordinates getCenterOfMass() {
    return this.centerOfMass;
  }
}

Then, in your PhysicsMgr...

public class PhysicsMgr {

  public boolean Collides(ICollidable p1, ICollidable p2) {
    Coordinates cm1 = p1.getCenterOfMass();
    Coordinates cm2 = p2.getCenterOfMass();

    int length = Math.sqrt(Math.pow(cm1.x - cm2.x, 2) + Math.pow(cm1.y - cm2.y, 2))

    // It is a misnomer to use coordinates as a unit vector, but if I defined a 
    // UnitVector class, it would be exactly the same with the exception of
    // the class name for this situation.
    Coordinates unitVector = new Coordinates((cm1.x - cm2.x)/length, (cm1.y - cm2.y)/length);

    int collisionDistance1 = p1.getMaxDistanceFromCenterOfMass(unitVector);
    int collisionDistance2 = p2.getMaxDistanceFromCenterOfMass(unitVector);

    return (length - collisionDistance1 - collisionDistance2) <= 0;
  }
}

The one major caveat here is that using the maxDistance from center of mass literally will only give you an approximation for the Square and Triangle. To be exact, you will have to declare some orientation, theta, and calculate the distance from the center of mass of the object to the edge along the unit vector (which will be tricky, but exact).

Another thing that is nice about this is that it allows you to easily add other collidable objects as your engine becomes more sophisticated. This also makes it so that none of the objects have to know about each other.

I was a physics TA for 3 years and it was actually how I got my first exposure to programming. If you're interested in the extra work, here is a reference to the book we used: http://matterandinteractions.org/ It is great for programmers because it teaches physics by using coding examples in python (specifically, vpython http://vpython.org/ ). So this would be a very good reference to have for physics programming.

  • Approximating everything as circles of course "fixes" the need for separate cases in the calculation. And I think that even adding orientation into the mix to arrive at a "tricky" formula will also not be exact for all shapes unless you introduce separate explicit cases again. – Thilo Nov 20 '11 at 8:31
  • Introducing explicit cases is not the way to go here. Otherwise supporting any new object will require new code to be added to every other object in the known universe of the physics engine. I'm only calling the implementation tricky because most people aren't used to doing physics with unit vectors and theta orientations; not because its magical or loosely defined. Given the unit vector and orientation of an object (as well as distance from cm for a representative amount of points for complex objects like semicircles) you can determine the exact point at which two objects collide. – Dave Nov 20 '11 at 8:54
  • Hi, firstly thanks for the detailed post! I should have been a little more clear in my question though. My objects are not circles and squares and triangles, that's simply their shape. So I've got an Entity class that IS the actual object "player, bad guy, obstacle, whatever" that has a member "protected Collidable mPhysicsShape" that simply describes the physics of that shape. Since I'm doing stuff in 2D, and my objects is a heavily physics based game, almost everything is represented physically as some sort of primitive shape. Your solution would cause everything to act like a circle though. – Andrew Rasmussen Nov 20 '11 at 20:43
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public boolean Collides(Square) {...}
public boolean Collides(Circle) {...}
public boolean Collides(Triangle) {...}

You are going to need separate implementations for the various combinations of shapes (because there is no common algorithm, I think). So at one point, there will be the need to call instanceof. I am afraid having an abstract method or interface method public boolean Collides(Collidable) is not going to help here, and what you have now cannot be significantly improved upon. This is a textbook case of the limitations of OOP, because these collision detection methods cannot be neatly attached to any of the shape classes, they live somewhere in between, in something like your physics manager.

  • You could actually avoid explicit instanceof calls by using the "double-dispatch" method @Ted Hopp describes, but it involves quite a lot of duplicated or boilerplate code. OTOH that would provide you with a sort of completeness check by the compiler. Either way, it's not pretty. – Thilo Nov 20 '11 at 7:48
  • 1
    You can cut the number of cross-shape methods that need non-trivial implementations in half: once you've implemented, say, Square.Collides(Circle), then you can define Circle.Collides(Square square) { return square.Collides(this); }. – Ted Hopp Nov 20 '11 at 7:56
  • Yes, that is the boilerplate code I was talking about (another example is the duplicated implementation of Collides(Collidable) that just bounces back to facilitate the double-dispatch). One must also take care to avoid recursive loops. But I agree the method you propose is perfectly valid. I am not saying aggregating everything in the physics manager is better. Both methods leave lots to be desired. But I am not aware of a more satisfactory third way. – Thilo Nov 20 '11 at 8:00

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