36

It seems it's possible with C#, but I need that with C++ and preferably cross platform.

Basically, I have a switch that sorts stuff on single criteria, and falls back to default processing on everything else.

Say:

switch(color)
{
case GREEN:
case RED:
case BLUE:
    Paint();
    break;
case YELLOW:
    if(AlsoHasCriteriaX)
        Paint();
    else
        goto default;
    break;
default:
    Print("Ugly color, no paint.")
    break;
}
5
  • 1
    Have you tried it? I think it might be possible... Commented Nov 20, 2011 at 14:37
  • Why not use standard programming practice and have the else and the default call a function (inline or otherwise) as they are intended to perform the same action.
    – Jim H.
    Commented Nov 20, 2011 at 14:42
  • 2
    @MerlynMorgan-Graham you cannot use goto default; default is a keyword and cannot be used as a label. the fact that C# is doing it is screwy :-) hehe ... Commented Nov 20, 2011 at 14:48
  • It would actually make as much sense to have default as just another label that is the default if non match. That is what the assembly does. If the value isn't in the jump table it will jump to the default location. So I would not say that allowing one to jump to default: is screwy. The screwy part is that some languages treat switch like an if/else-if with booleans.
    – Beached
    Commented Nov 20, 2011 at 17:18
  • Beached 1) i was talking about parse phase of C; C keywords are NOT allowed to be used as labels; 2) you are presuming that the generated assembly WILL use a label/jump ... What if the target CPU uses some completely different branching mechanism? Commented Nov 26, 2011 at 8:03

2 Answers 2

48

Ahmed's answer is good, but there's also:

switch(color)
case YELLOW:
    if(AlsoHasCriteriaX)
case GREEN:
case RED:
case BLUE:
        Paint();
    else
default:
        Print("Ugly color, no paint.");

people tend to forget how powerful switches are

9
  • 20
    @Matt "Many people (even bwk?) have said that the worst feature of C is that switches don't break automatically before each case label. This code forms some sort of argument in that debate, but I'm not sure whether it's for or against."
    – Steve Cox
    Commented Jul 18, 2014 at 19:32
  • 6
    It's not about the lack of breaking, it's about putting case labels in between the components of an if-block.
    – Matt
    Commented Jul 25, 2014 at 14:13
  • 2
    I'm wondering, if color is BLUE and AlsoHasCriteriaX is false, would that call both Paint() and Print()? Or: how is the else statement evaluated if you jump right into the if body?
    – Torben L.
    Commented Dec 15, 2014 at 15:25
  • 3
    The real problem with this code is when you try to change/add something. Commented Jan 21, 2018 at 15:37
  • 6
    Forget all the criticism. This snippet is awesome and real programmers must be able to cope with this kind of things. Thumbs (and vote) up! Commented Jun 18, 2018 at 14:22
38

Not quite but you can do this:

switch(color)
{
case GREEN:
case RED:
case BLUE:
     Paint();
     break;
case YELLOW:
     if(AlsoHasCriteriaX) {
         Paint();
         break; /* notice break here */
     }
default:
     Print("Ugly color, no paint.")
     break;
}

OR you could do this:

switch(color)
{
case GREEN:
case RED:
case BLUE:
     Paint();
     break;
case YELLOW:
     if(AlsoHasCriteriaX) {
         Paint();
         break; /* notice break here */
     }
     goto explicit_label;

case FUCHSIA:
     PokeEyesOut();
     break;

default:
explicit_label:
     Print("Ugly color, no paint.")
     break;
}
0

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