32

I have a user foo with the following privileges (it's not a member of any group):

{
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Sid": "Stmt1308813201865",
      "Action": "s3:*",
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bar"
    }
  ]
}

That user however seem unable to upload or do much of anything until I grant full access to authenticated users (which might apply to anyone). This still doesn't let the user change permission as is throwing an error after an upload when it tries to do do key.set_acl('public-read').

Ideally this user would have full access to the bar bucket and nothing else, what am I doing wrong?

41

You need to grant s3:ListBucket permission to the bucket itself. Try the policy below.

{
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": "S3:*",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bar/*",
      "Condition": {}
    },
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": [
        "s3:ListBucket"
      ],
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bar",
      "Condition": {}
    }
  ]
}
  • 4
    Some nuance: It seems that bar/* is needed to access objects inside the bar bucket, whereas bar is needed to list/modify the bucket itself. – treat your mods well Feb 24 '13 at 2:30
  • Using Cyberduck to access S3 with the above permission didn't seem to work. It may be that Cyberduck needs ListAllMyBuckets as mentioned by @Suman. However if you use the command line tool from timkay.com, this works perfectly. – Thanh Nguyen Mar 12 '13 at 7:40
  • 5
    Thanks a million. I F$%#@^ING hate s3 with its cumbersome policies. Just wasted 2 hours till I finally found the solution. – Nimo Oct 9 '14 at 23:22
  • 4
    It works in Cyberduck if you set "Path" under "More Options" to the bucket name. Then you don't need to add ListAllMyBuckets. – Joar Leth Sep 18 '15 at 8:23
  • Would just like to confirm what @JoarLeth said: if you set the path in cyberduck connection options, then you don't need a ListAllMyBuckets permission – WickyNilliams Jun 16 '16 at 21:41
20

The selected answer didn't work for me, but this one did:

{
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Action": "s3:*",
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Resource": [
        "arn:aws:s3:::my-bucket",
        "arn:aws:s3:::my-bucket/*"
      ]
    }
  ],
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Action": "s3:ListAllMyBuckets",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::*"
    }
  ]
}

Credit: http://mikeferrier.com/2011/10/27/granting-access-to-a-single-s3-bucket-using-amazon-iam/

  • 3
    This allows listing of all buckets and doesn't limit access to just the bucket in question. – Thanh Nguyen Mar 12 '13 at 7:44
  • 2
    +1 for me: the voted one didn't work with Ruby's Fog gem but this conf worked of. – Dirty Henry Jul 26 '13 at 14:10
  • 5
    @Thanh Nguyen: Wrong. It will list all the buckets but will provide access only to the said bucket in the policy. – slayedbylucifer Nov 18 '13 at 6:05
  • I needed this recipe to allow my IAM user to access the S3 console. – dannyman May 9 '17 at 21:03
8

Are you aware of the AWS Policy Generator?

  • Yes, but it does not answer the question. – dannyman May 9 '17 at 18:31
  • the policy generator raises more questions than it answers – woens Oct 15 '19 at 10:00
2

There is an official AWS documentation at Writing IAM Policies: How to Grant Access to an Amazon S3 Bucket

Just copy and paste the appropriate rule and change the "Resource" key to your bucket's ARN in all Statements.

For programamtic access the policy should be:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": ["s3:ListBucket"],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::bar"]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:PutObject",
                "s3:PutObjectAcl",
                "s3:GetObject",
                "s3:GetObjectAcl",
                "s3:DeleteObject"
            ],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::bar/*"]
        }
    ]
}

And for console access access should be:

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:GetBucketLocation",
                "s3:ListAllMyBuckets"
            ],
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bar*"
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": ["s3:ListBucket"],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::bar"]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:PutObject",
                "s3:PutObjectAcl",
                "s3:GetObject",
                "s3:GetObjectAcl",
                "s3:DeleteObject"
            ],
            "Resource": ["arn:aws:s3:::bar/*"]
        }
    ]
}
0

That works for me:

{
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:ListBucket",
                "s3:GetBucketLocation",
                "s3:ListBucketMultipartUploads",
                "s3:ListBucketVersions"
            ],
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bucket_name_here"
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                "s3:*Object*",
                "s3:ListMultipartUploadParts",
                "s3:AbortMultipartUpload"
            ],
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::bucket_name_here/*"
        }
    ]
}
0

If you've been pulling your hair out because you cannot figure out why Cyberduck is not being able to set object ACLs but it works with another client (like Panic Transmit) here is the solution:

You need to add s3:GetBucketAcl to your Action list, eg:

{
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Sid": "Stmt1",
            "Action": [
                "s3:GetBucketAcl",
                "s3:ListBucket",
                "s3:DeleteObject",
                "s3:GetObject",
                "s3:GetObjectAcl",
                "s3:PutObject",
                "s3:PutObjectAcl"
            ],
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::your-bucket-name"
        }
    ]
}

Of course you don't need to do this if you are less restrictive with s3:* but I think this is good to know.

0

@cloudberryman's answer is correct but I like to make things as short as possible. This answer can be reduced to:

{  
   "Statement":[  
      {  
         "Effect":"Allow",
         "Action":"S3:*",
         "Resource":[  
            "arn:aws:s3:::bar",
            "arn:aws:s3:::bar/*"
         ]
      }
   ]
}
0
{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": [
                        "s3:GetBucketLocation",
                        "s3:ListAllMyBuckets"
                      ],
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::*"
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "s3:*",
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::YOUR-BUCKET",
                "arn:aws:s3:::YOUR-BUCKET/*"
            ]
        }
    ]
}
0

Allow bucket inner folders by mentioning like below in resource, Also you should give list permission to all buckets. Check out below sample policy,

{
    "Version": "2012-10-17",
    "Statement": [
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "s3:*",
            "Resource": [
                "arn:aws:s3:::example-bucket",
                "arn:aws:s3:::example-bucket/*"
            ]
        },
        {
            "Effect": "Allow",
            "Action": "s3:ListAllMyBuckets",
            "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::*"
        }
    ]
}

To know more details about this find this article.

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