33

How can i select the first and last row for each unique id in the following dataframe?

tmp <- structure(list(id = c(15L, 15L, 15L, 15L, 21L, 21L, 22L, 22L, 
22L, 23L, 23L, 23L, 24L, 24L, 24L, 24L), d = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L), gr = c(2L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L), mm = c(3.4, 
4.9, 4.4, 5.5, 4, 3.8, 4, 4.9, 4.6, 2.7, 4, 3, 3, 2, 4, 2), area = c(1L, 
2L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 2L, 3L)), .Names = c("id", 
"d", "gr", "mm", "area"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-16L))
tmp
#>    id d gr  mm area
#> 1  15 1  2 3.4    1
#> 2  15 1  1 4.9    2
#> 3  15 1  1 4.4    1
#> 4  15 1  1 5.5    2
#> 5  21 1  1 4.0    2
#> 6  21 1  2 3.8    2
#> 7  22 1  1 4.0    2
#> 8  22 1  1 4.9    2
#> 9  22 1  2 4.6    2
#> 10 23 1  1 2.7    2
#> 11 23 1  1 4.0    2
#> 12 23 1  2 3.0    2
#> 13 24 1  1 3.0    2
#> 14 24 1  1 2.0    3
#> 15 24 1  1 4.0    2
#> 16 24 1  2 2.0    3
26

A plyr solution (tmp is your data frame):

library("plyr")
ddply(tmp, .(id), function(x) x[c(1, nrow(x)), ])
#    id d gr  mm area
# 1  15 1  2 3.4    1
# 2  15 1  1 5.5    2
# 3  21 1  1 4.0    2
# 4  21 1  2 3.8    2
# 5  22 1  1 4.0    2
# 6  22 1  2 4.6    2
# 7  23 1  1 2.7    2
# 8  23 1  2 3.0    2
# 9  24 1  1 3.0    2
# 10 24 1  2 2.0    3

Or with dplyr (see also here):

library("dplyr")
tmp %>%
group_by(id) %>%
slice(c(1, n())) %>%
ungroup()
# # A tibble: 10 × 5
#       id     d    gr    mm  area
#    <int> <int> <int> <dbl> <int>
# 1     15     1     2   3.4     1
# 2     15     1     1   5.5     2
# 3     21     1     1   4.0     2
# 4     21     1     2   3.8     2
# 5     22     1     1   4.0     2
# 6     22     1     2   4.6     2
# 7     23     1     1   2.7     2
# 8     23     1     2   3.0     2
# 9     24     1     1   3.0     2
# 10    24     1     2   2.0     3
  • Thanks a lot for this very useful solution. Really appreciated!! – Francesco Nov 21 '11 at 7:41
80

A fast and short data.table solution :

tmp[, .SD[c(1,.N)], by=id]

where .SD represents each (S)ubset of (D)ata, .N is the number of rows in each group and tmp is a data.table; e.g. as provided by fread() by default or by converting a data.frame using setDT().

Note that if a group only contains one row, that row will appear twice in the output because that row is both the first and last row of that group. To avoid the repetition in that case, thanks to @Thell:

tmp[, .SD[unique(c(1,.N))], by=id]

Alternatively, the following makes the logic explicit for the .N==1 special case :

tmp[, if (.N==1) .SD else .SD[c(1,.N)], by=id]

You don't need .SD[1] in the first part of the if because in that case .N is 1 so .SD must be just one row anyway.

You can wrap j in {} and have a whole page of code inside {} if you like. Just as long as the last expression inside {} returns a list- like object to be stacked (such as a plain list, data.table or data.frame).

tmp[, { ...; if (.N==1) .SD else .SD[c(1,.N)] } , by=id]
  • 8
    .SD[unique(c(1,.N))] for when a group has a single member. – Thell Nov 22 '14 at 0:00
  • 2
    borrowing from data camp setkey(tmp,id) and tmp[, .SD[c(1,.N)], .EACHI] – Kerry Feb 13 '16 at 19:24
  • @Kerry I have to admit I didn't know setkey(tmp,id); tmp[, .SD[c(1,.N)], .EACHI] would work without any i present. Where exactly is it on DataCamp? Thanks. – Matt Dowle Feb 15 '16 at 1:53
  • @MattDowle it can be found on Chapter 3 > exercise: Selecting groups or parts of groups: Use by = .EACHI and .SD to select the first and last row of the "b" and "c" groups. and in the exercise DT[c("b","c"), .SD[c(1,.N)], by= .EACHI] # The first row of the "b" and "c" groups great course btw – C8H10N4O2 Sep 16 '16 at 15:38
  • 1
    @SymbolixAU Using .I for this is getting a bit complicated and for large groups .I would be constructed wastefully only to use the first and last from it. – Matt Dowle Jul 14 '17 at 17:47
4

Here is a solution in base R. If there are multiple groups with the same id this code returns the first and last row for each of those individual groups.

EDIT: January 12, 2017

This solution might be a little more intuitive than my other answer farther below:

lmy.df = read.table(text = '
     id    d    gr     mm  area
     15    1     2   3.40     1
     15    1     1   4.90     2
     15    1     1   4.40     1
     15    1     1   5.50     2
     21    1     1   4.00     2
     21    1     2   3.80     2
     22    1     1   4.00     2
     23    1     1   2.70     2
     23    1     1   4.00     2
     23    1     2   3.00     2
     24    1     1   3.00     2
     24    1     1   2.00     3
     24    1     1   4.00     2
     24    1     2   2.00     3
', header = TRUE)

head <- aggregate(lmy.df, by=list(lmy.df$id), FUN = function(x) { first = head(x,1) } )
tail <- aggregate(lmy.df, by=list(lmy.df$id), FUN = function(x) {  last = tail(x,1) } )
head$order = 'first'
tail$order = 'last'

my.output <- rbind(head, tail)
my.output
#   Group.1 id d gr  mm area order
#1       15 15 1  2 3.4    1 first
#2       21 21 1  1 4.0    2 first
#3       22 22 1  1 4.0    2 first
#4       23 23 1  1 2.7    2 first
#5       24 24 1  1 3.0    2 first
#6       15 15 1  1 5.5    2  last
#7       21 21 1  2 3.8    2  last
#8       22 22 1  1 4.0    2  last
#9       23 23 1  2 3.0    2  last
#10      24 24 1  2 2.0    3  last

EDIT: June 18, 2016

Since posting my original answer I have learned it is better to use lapply than apply. This is because apply does not work if every group has the same number of rows. See here: Error when numbering rows by group

lmy.df = read.table(text = '
     id    d    gr     mm  area
     15    1     2   3.40     1
     15    1     1   4.90     2
     15    1     1   4.40     1
     15    1     1   5.50     2
     21    1     1   4.00     2
     21    1     2   3.80     2
     22    1     1   4.00     2
     23    1     1   2.70     2
     23    1     1   4.00     2
     23    1     2   3.00     2
     24    1     1   3.00     2
     24    1     1   2.00     3
     24    1     1   4.00     2
     24    1     2   2.00     3
', header = TRUE)


lmy.seq <- rle(lmy.df$id)$lengths
lmy.df$first <- unlist(lapply(lmy.seq, function(x) seq(1,x)))
lmy.df$last  <- unlist(lapply(lmy.seq, function(x) seq(x,1,-1)))
lmy.df

lmy.df2 <- lmy.df[lmy.df$first==1 | lmy.df$last == 1,]
lmy.df2

#   id d gr  mm area first last
#1  15 1  2 3.4    1     1    4
#4  15 1  1 5.5    2     4    1
#5  21 1  1 4.0    2     1    2
#6  21 1  2 3.8    2     2    1
#7  22 1  1 4.0    2     1    1
#8  23 1  1 2.7    2     1    3
#10 23 1  2 3.0    2     3    1
#11 24 1  1 3.0    2     1    4
#14 24 1  2 2.0    3     4    1

Here is an example in which each group has two rows:

lmy.df = read.table(text = '
     id    d    gr     mm  area
     15    1     2   3.40     1
     15    1     1   4.90     2
     21    1     1   4.00     2
     21    1     2   3.80     2
     22    1     1   4.00     2
     22    1     1   6.00     2
     23    1     1   2.70     2
     23    1     2   3.00     2
     24    1     1   3.00     2
     24    1     2   2.00     3
', header = TRUE)

lmy.seq <- rle(lmy.df$id)$lengths

lmy.df$first <- unlist(lapply(lmy.seq, function(x) seq(1,x)))
lmy.df$last  <- unlist(lapply(lmy.seq, function(x) seq(x,1,-1)))
lmy.df

lmy.df2 <- lmy.df[lmy.df$first==1 | lmy.df$last == 1,]
lmy.df2

#   id d gr  mm area first last
#1  15 1  2 3.4    1     1    2
#2  15 1  1 4.9    2     2    1
#3  21 1  1 4.0    2     1    2
#4  21 1  2 3.8    2     2    1
#5  22 1  1 4.0    2     1    2
#6  22 1  1 6.0    2     2    1
#7  23 1  1 2.7    2     1    2
#8  23 1  2 3.0    2     2    1
#9  24 1  1 3.0    2     1    2
#10 24 1  2 2.0    3     2    1

Original answer:

my.seq <- data.frame(rle(my.df$id)$lengths)

my.df$first <- unlist(apply(my.seq, 1, function(x) seq(1,x)))
my.df$last  <- unlist(apply(my.seq, 1, function(x) seq(x,1,-1)))

my.df2 <- my.df[my.df$first==1 | my.df$last == 1,]
my.df2

   id d gr  mm area first last
1  15 1  2 3.4    1     1    4
4  15 1  1 5.5    2     4    1
5  21 1  1 4.0    2     1    2
6  21 1  2 3.8    2     2    1
7  22 1  1 4.0    2     1    3
9  22 1  2 4.6    2     3    1
10 23 1  1 2.7    2     1    3
12 23 1  2 3.0    2     3    1
13 24 1  1 3.0    2     1    4
16 24 1  2 2.0    3     4    1

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