18

I get the following output:

Pushkin - 100500 
Gogol - 23 
Dostoyevsky - 9999

Which is the result of the following script:

for k in "${!authors[@]}"
do
    echo $k ' - ' ${authors["$k"]}
done   

All I want is to get the output like this:

Pushkin - 100500 
Dostoyevsky - 9999
Gogol - 23

which means that the keys in associative array should be sorted by value. Is there an easy method to do so?

19

You can easily sort your output, in descending numerical order of the 3rd field:

for k in "${!authors[@]}"
do
    echo $k ' - ' ${authors["$k"]}
done |
sort -rn -k3

See sort(1) for more about the sort command. This just sorts output lines; I don't know of any way to sort an array directly in bash.

I also can't see how the above can give you names ("Pushkin" et al.) as array keys. In bash, array keys are always integers.

  • 6
    Bash 4.0 adds associative arrays where the keys can be strings. – Michael Hoffman Nov 21 '11 at 19:34
  • 2
    Well I'll be... you're right. It just needs declare -A authors. – Andrew Schulman Nov 21 '11 at 21:39
  • 1
    Your solution works. As far as I understand, it just sorts output strings, not the contents of the associative array, but anyway, the output produced is what I need. – Graf Nov 22 '11 at 8:44
7

Alternatively you can sort the indexes and use the sorted list of indexes to loop through the array:

authors_indexes=( ${!authors[@]} )
IFS=$'\n' authors_sorted=( $(echo -e "${authors_indexes[@]/%/\n}" | sed -r -e 's/^ *//' -e '/^$/d' | sort) )

for k in "${authors_sorted[@]}"; do
  echo $k ' - ' ${authors["$k"]}
done 
  • 1
    Boo, hiss re: echo -e. Consider printf '%s\n' "${authors_indexes[@]}" to expand an array into multiple lines in a way that doesn't depend on violations of POSIX sh (not just extensions, but actual violations: Any argument other than -n is required to print its text, unless it contains backslashes or -n is present, in which case behavior is entirely implementation-defined). Or printf '%s\0' "${array[@]}" to expand the array as NUL-delimit strings, thus in a manner that works even if you have literal newlines in your keys (which are legal). – Charles Duffy Nov 9 '16 at 23:34
  • ...see pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/utilities/echo.html, particularly the APPLICATION USAGE section. – Charles Duffy Nov 9 '16 at 23:34
3

Extending the answer from @AndrewSchulman, using -rn as a global sort option reverses all columns. In this example, authors with the same associative array value will be output by reverse order of name.

For example

declare -A authors
authors=( [Pushkin]=10050 [Gogol]=23 [Dostoyevsky]=9999 [Tolstoy]=23 )

for k in "${!authors[@]}"
do
  echo $k ' - ' ${authors["$k"]}
done | sort -rn -k3

will output

Pushkin  -  10050
Dostoyevsky  -  9999
Tolstoy  -  23
Gogol  -  23
Options for sorting specific columns can be provided after the column specifier. i.e. sort -k3rn

Note that keys can be specified as spans. Here -k3 happens to be fine because it is the final span, but to use only column 3 explicitly (in case further columns were added), it should be specified as -k3,3, Similarly to sort by column three in descending order, and then column one in ascending order (which is probably what is desired in this example):

declare -A authors
authors=( [Pushkin]=10050 [Gogol]=23 [Dostoyevsky]=9999 [Tolstoy]=23 )
for k in "${!authors[@]}"
do
  echo $k ' - ' ${authors["$k"]}
done | sort -k3,3rn -k1,1

will output

Pushkin  -  10050
Dostoyevsky  -  9999
Gogol  -  23
Tolstoy  -  23

1

The best way to sort a bash associative array by VALUE is to NOT sort it.

Instead, get the list of VALUE:::KEYS, sort that list into a new KEY LIST, and iterate through the list.

declare -A ADDR
ADDR[192.168.1.3]="host3"
ADDR[192.168.1.1]="host1"
ADDR[192.168.1.2]="host2"

KEYS=$(
for KEY in ${!ADDR[@]}; do
  echo "${ADDR[$KEY]}:::$KEY"
done | sort | awk -F::: '{print $2}'
)

for KEY in $KEYS; do
  VAL=${ADDR[$KEY]}
  echo "KEY=[$KEY] VAL=[$VAL]"
done

output:
KEY=[192.168.1.1] VAL=[host1]
KEY=[192.168.1.2] VAL=[host2]
KEY=[192.168.1.3] VAL=[host3]

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