616

I have an array like

vendors = [
    {
      Name: 'Magenic',
      ID: 'ABC'
     },
    {
      Name: 'Microsoft',
      ID: 'DEF'
    } //and so on goes array... 
];

How do I check this array to see if Magenic exists? I don't want to loop, unless I have to. I'm working with potentially a couple thousand records.


UPDATED

Since this has been a popular post, I thought I'd share something new I found. And it appears @CAFxX has already shared this! I should read these more often. I came across https://benfrain.com/understanding-native-javascript-array-methods/.

vendors.filter(function(vendor){ return vendor.Name === "Magenic" })

And with ECMAScript 2015 it is even simpler using the new arrow functions:

vendors.filter(vendor => vendor.Name === "Magenic")
  • Please pardon the seemingly random comment, but did your question concern JSON or just JavaScript arrays? – Alex Turpin Nov 21 '11 at 19:42
  • 4
    @CAFxX solution is better, would be awesome if you update the selected solution. – eMarine Dec 1 '15 at 10:21
  • 1
    Agreed, didn't see that earlier! – David Lozzi Aug 5 '16 at 13:48
  • You can simplify this now even more by using arrow functions. All modern browsers support this and looks nicer. – Piotr Kula Mar 21 '17 at 14:04
  • you can use map function, very usefull – Monir alhussini Sep 5 '18 at 11:33

23 Answers 23

254

2018 edit: This answer is from 2011, before browsers had widely supported array filtering methods and arrow functions. Have a look at CAFxX's answer.

There is no "magic" way to check for something in an array without a loop. Even if you use some function, the function itself will use a loop. What you can do is break out of the loop as soon as you find what you're looking for to minimize computational time.

var found = false;
for(var i = 0; i < vendors.length; i++) {
    if (vendors[i].Name == 'Magenic') {
        found = true;
        break;
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 4
    No problem. Keep in mind that Keith's solution is also very viable and saves you from looping. – Alex Turpin Nov 21 '11 at 19:41
  • 2
    You don't need a flag if all you need to know is whether or not "something" is in, you can just check the value of the scan index with the size of array. For this to work the index var needs to be declared before the for statement of course. – Alex Oct 29 '14 at 21:05
  • 5
    These options seem to work now: vendors.forEach, vendors.filter, vendors.reduce – David Lozzi Aug 5 '16 at 13:45
  • 1
    what about JSON.stringify(vendors).indexOf('Magenic') !== -1 – Last Breath Mar 14 '19 at 12:23
  • 1
    @LastBreath that could result in a false positive quite easily if 'Magenic' is somewhere else in the object – Alex Turpin Mar 15 '19 at 16:22
886

No need to reinvent the wheel loop, at least not explicitly (using arrow functions, modern browsers only):

if (vendors.filter(e => e.Name === 'Magenic').length > 0) {
  /* vendors contains the element we're looking for */
}

or, better yet:

if (vendors.some(e => e.Name === 'Magenic')) {
  /* vendors contains the element we're looking for */
}

EDIT: If you need compatibility with lousy browsers then your best bet is:

if (vendors.filter(function(e) { return e.Name === 'Magenic'; }).length > 0) {
  /* vendors contains the element we're looking for */
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 4
    @Rocket why did you edit my answer? The syntax without the curly braces is perfectly valid javascript. – CAFxX Nov 21 '11 at 20:08
  • 1
    You forgot the return. Huh, what's that link?... Seems the function(e) e.name == 'Magenic' syntax isn't supported by Chrome 16, so I highly doubt other browsers (read: IE) support it. Ok, so, I just tested this, and it doesn't work without the curly braces, Chrome 16 says Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected token return or Uncaught SyntaxError: Unexpected identifier. jsfiddle.net/T4hWq/1 Also .some doesn't work in IE < 9. – Rocket Hazmat Nov 21 '11 at 20:55
  • 4
    The "lambda" syntax still doesn't work in Chrome 16 (which is not a lousy browser). – Rocket Hazmat Nov 21 '11 at 22:12
  • 26
    It depends on your definition of lousy, I guess. That syntax is part of javascript 1.8. – CAFxX Nov 22 '11 at 7:57
  • 7
    The expression closures you are using here in the first and second examples have a Non-standard, do not use! warning from Mozilla (see that link). They only ever worked in Firefox, and are now deprecated and will be removed in favour of arrow functions. – doppelgreener Dec 7 '16 at 13:56
87

No loop necessary. Three methods that come to mind:

Array.prototype.some()

This is the most exact answer for your question, i.e. "check if something exists", implying a bool result. This will be true if there are any 'Magenic' objects, false otherwise:

let hasMagenicVendor = vendors.some( vendor => vendor['Name'] === 'Magenic' )

Array.prototype.filter()

This will return an array of all 'Magenic' objects, even if there is only one (will return a one-element array):

let magenicVendors = vendors.filter( vendor => vendor['Name'] === 'Magenic' )

If you try to coerce this to a boolean, it will not work, as an empty array (no 'Magenic' objects) is still truthy. So just use magenicVendors.length in your conditional.

Array.prototype.find()

This will return the first 'Magenic' object (or undefined if there aren't any):

let magenicVendor = vendors.find( vendor => vendor['Name'] === 'Magenic' );

This coerces to a boolean okay (any object is truthy, undefined is falsy).


Note: I'm using vendor["Name"] instead of vendor.Name because of the weird casing of the property names.

Note 2: No reason to use loose equality (==) instead of strict equality (===) when checking the name.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    It's useful to point out that under the hood, these are all looping. These are also all slower computationally than simply for looping and performing operations. – ThePartyTurtle Jan 18 '17 at 19:31
  • May as well go share that love here: stackoverflow.com/questions/21748670/… so more people like me don't navigate to that old page and make assumptions. – ThePartyTurtle Jan 19 '17 at 15:55
43

The accepted answer still works but now we have an ECMAScript 6 native method [Array.find][1] to achieve the same effect.

Quoting MDN:

The find() method returns the value of the first element in the array that satisfies the provided testing function. Otherwise undefined is returned.

var arr = []; 
var item = {
  id: '21',
  step: 'step2',
  label: 'Banana',
  price: '19$'
};

arr.push(item);
/* note : data is the actual object that matched search criteria 
  or undefined if nothing matched */
var data = arr.find( function( ele ) { 
    return ele.id === '21';
} );

if( data ) {
 console.log( 'found' );
 console.log(data); // This is entire object i.e. `item` not boolean
}

See my jsfiddle link There is a polyfill for IE provided by mozilla

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    Could be shorter if you just do return ele.id == '2', but +1 for a good ES6 solution. – Lye Fish Mar 5 '16 at 1:47
  • Good to have fresh answer :) Just wondering if performance are better or not than answers above... – Emidomenge Jul 22 '16 at 7:45
  • I think it is important to point out that the return value of 'data' (when ele.id matches an id, such as '21') is going to be the array item itself (in this case, the whole item object). If the expectation was that the data variable result would be 'true' or 'false' instead of a falsy value, you would be sorely disappointed. – adamgede Mar 10 '17 at 2:01
  • Thx! My task was a bit different. Get the index of Object in the Array => push if <0 || splice(index, 1) here is my a bit updated code: const index = this.selected.indexOf(this.selected.find(s => s.id == passedObj.id)) – Leonid Zadorozhnykh Aug 24 '17 at 8:27
26

Here's the way I'd do it

const found = vendors.some(item => item.Name === 'Magenic');

array.some() method checks if there is at least one value in an array that matches criteria and returns a boolean. From here on you can go with:

if (found) {
// do something
} else {
// do something else
}
|improve this answer|||||
21

Unless you want to restructure it like this:

vendors = {
    Magenic: {
      Name: 'Magenic',
      ID: 'ABC'
     },
    Microsoft: {
      Name: 'Microsoft',
      ID: 'DEF'
    } and so on... 
};

to which you can do if(vendors.Magnetic)

You will have to loop

|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    In case he still wanted to maintain the object structure to use it else where – Keith.Abramo Nov 21 '11 at 19:38
21

As per ECMAScript 6 specification, you can use findIndex.

const magenicIndex = vendors.findIndex(vendor => vendor.Name === 'Magenic');

magenicIndex will hold either 0 (which is the index in the array) or -1 if it wasn't found.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Just to make people aware that 0 would still match as a false result if that was used as the condition. For this reason I think find() is better as you get a more logical truthy evaluation. – dhj Apr 4 '18 at 12:32
15

As the OP has asked the question if the key exists or not.

A more elegant solution that will return boolean using ES6 reduce function can be

const magenicVendorExists =  vendors.reduce((accumulator, vendor) => (accumulator||vendor.Name === "Magenic"), false);

Note: The initial parameter of reduce is a false and if the array has the key it will return true.

Hope it helps for better and cleaner code implementation

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Since when !![] equals to false? – Sergey Jan 19 '19 at 12:59
  • 1
    Nice catch. Updated answer using reduce :) – Jay Chakra Jan 20 '19 at 14:09
  • 1
    This is wrong. The first parameter to reduce is the accumulator and not the vendor object. This checks false.Name === "Magenic" in every loop and it returns false – adiga Jun 18 '19 at 8:11
  • @adiga: Corrected. – Jay Chakra Jun 18 '19 at 10:12
  • 1
    Please also check Mirza Leka's solution. A much more elegant solution. – Jay Chakra Oct 18 '19 at 4:01
13

You cannot without looking into the object really.

You probably should change your structure a little, like

vendors = {
    Magenic:   'ABC',
    Microsoft: 'DEF'
};

Then you can just use it like a lookup-hash.

vendors['Microsoft']; // 'DEF'
vendors['Apple']; // undefined
|improve this answer|||||
5

You have to loop, there is no way around it.

function seekVendor(vendors, name) {
  for (var i=0, l=vendors.length; i<l; i++) {
    if (typeof vendors[i] == "object" && vendors[i].Name === name) {
      return vendors[i];
    }
  }
}

Of course you could use a library like linq.js to make this more pleasing:

Enumerable.From(vendors).Where("$.Name == 'Magenic'").First();

(see jsFiddle for a demo)

I doubt that linq.js will be faster than a straight-forward loop, but it certainly is more flexible when things get a little more complicated.

|improve this answer|||||
4

if you're using jquery you can take advantage of grep to create array with all matching objects:

var results = $.grep(vendors, function (e) {
    return e.Name == "Magenic";
});

and then use the results array:

for (var i=0, l=results.length; i<l; i++) {
    console.log(results[i].ID);
}
|improve this answer|||||
4

Testing for array elements:

JS Offers array functions which allow you to achieve this relatively easily. They are the following:

  1. Array.prototype.filter: Takes a callback function which is a test, the array is then iterated over with is callback and filtered according to this callback. A new filtered array is returned.
  2. Array.prototype.some: Takes a callback function which is a test, the array is then iterated over with is callback and if any element passes the test, the boolean true is returned. Otherwise false is returned

The specifics are best explained via an example:

Example:

vendors = [
    {
      Name: 'Magenic',
      ID: 'ABC'
     },
    {
      Name: 'Microsoft',
      ID: 'DEF'
    } //and so on goes array... 
];

// filter returns a new array, we instantly check if the length 
// is longer than zero of this newly created array
if (vendors.filter(company => company.Name === 'Magenic').length ) {
  console.log('I contain Magenic');
}

// some would be a better option then filter since it directly returns a boolean
if (vendors.some(company => company.Name === 'Magenic')) {
  console.log('I also contain Magenic');
}

Browser support:

These 2 function are ES6 function, not all browsers might support them. To overcome this you can use a polyfill. Here is the polyfill for Array.prototype.some (from MDN):

if (!Array.prototype.some) {
  Array.prototype.some = function(fun, thisArg) {
    'use strict';

    if (this == null) {
      throw new TypeError('Array.prototype.some called on null or undefined');
    }

    if (typeof fun !== 'function') {
      throw new TypeError();
    }

    var t = Object(this);
    var len = t.length >>> 0;

    for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
      if (i in t && fun.call(thisArg, t[i], i, t)) {
        return true;
      }
    }

    return false;
  };
}

|improve this answer|||||
3

Correct me if i'm wrong.. i could have used forEach method like this,

var found=false;
vendors.forEach(function(item){
   if(item.name === "name"){
       found=true;
       return;
   }
});

Nowadays i'm used to it ,because of it simplicity and self explanatory word. Thank you.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Note: no use of return here – Edison Nov 4 '19 at 12:06
2

You can try this its work for me.

const _ = require('lodash');

var arr = [
  {
    name: 'Jack',
    id: 1
  },
  {
    name: 'Gabriel',
    id: 2
  },
  {
    name: 'John',
    id: 3
  }
]

function findValue(arr,value) {
  return _.filter(arr, function (object) {
    return object['name'].toLowerCase().indexOf(value.toLowerCase()) >= 0;
  });
}

console.log(findValue(arr,'jack'))
//[ { name: 'Jack', id: 1 } ]
|improve this answer|||||
  • Well this is a really old question and I think its update already has the best solution nowadays. – Federico Galfione May 14 '19 at 14:37
2

May be too late, but javascript array has two methods some and every method that returns a boolean and can help you achieve this.

I think some would be most appropriate for what you intend to achieve.

vendors.some( vendor => vendor['Name'] !== 'Magenic' )

Some validates that any of the objects in the array satisfies the given condition.

vendors.every( vendor => vendor['Name'] !== 'Magenic' )

Every validates that all the objects in the array satisfies the given condition.

|improve this answer|||||
  • It doesn't work const array1 = [{name:'Mike'},{name:'Alice'}]; console.log(array1.every(item => item.name !== 'Mike')); it should return true – Thanwa Ch. Mar 15 at 17:52
  • Sorry pal, I meant some, will update my answer. – Akinjiola Toni Mar 30 at 22:58
1

You can use lodash. If lodash library is too heavy for your application consider chunking out unnecessary function not used.

let newArray = filter(_this.props.ArrayOne, function(item) {
                    return find(_this.props.ArrayTwo, {"speciesId": item.speciesId});
                });

This is just one way to do this. Another one can be:

var newArray=  [];
     _.filter(ArrayOne, function(item) {
                        return AllSpecies.forEach(function(cItem){
                            if (cItem.speciesId == item.speciesId){
                            newArray.push(item);
                          }
                        }) 
                    });

console.log(arr);

The above example can also be rewritten without using any libraries like:

var newArray=  [];
ArrayOne.filter(function(item) {
                return ArrayTwo.forEach(function(cItem){
                    if (cItem.speciesId == item.speciesId){
                    newArray.push(item);
                  }
                }) 
            });
console.log(arr);

Hope my answer helps.

|improve this answer|||||
1

Many answers here are good and pretty easy. But if your array of object is having a fixed set of value then you can use below trick:

Map all the name in a object.

vendors = [
    {
      Name: 'Magenic',
      ID: 'ABC'
     },
    {
      Name: 'Microsoft',
      ID: 'DEF'
    }
];

var dirtyObj = {}
for(var count=0;count<vendors.length;count++){
   dirtyObj[vendors[count].Name] = true //or assign which gives you true.
}

Now this dirtyObj you can use again and again without any loop.

if(dirtyObj[vendor.Name]){
  console.log("Hey! I am available.");
}
|improve this answer|||||
1

To compare one object to another, I combine a for in loop (used to loop through objects) and some(). You do not have to worry about an array going out of bounds etc, so that saves some code. Documentation on .some can be found here

var productList = [{id: 'text3'}, {id: 'text2'}, {id: 'text4', product: 'Shampoo'}]; // Example of selected products
var theDatabaseList = [{id: 'text1'}, {id: 'text2'},{id: 'text3'},{id:'text4', product: 'shampoo'}];    
var  objectsFound = [];

for(let objectNumber in productList){
    var currentId = productList[objectNumber].id;   
    if (theDatabaseList.some(obj => obj.id === currentId)) {
        // Do what you need to do with the matching value here
        objectsFound.push(currentId);
    }
}
console.log(objectsFound);

An alternative way I compare one object to another is to use a nested for loop with Object.keys().length to get the amount of objects in the array. Code below:

var productList = [{id: 'text3'}, {id: 'text2'}, {id: 'text4', product: 'Shampoo'}]; // Example of selected products
var theDatabaseList = [{id: 'text1'}, {id: 'text2'},{id: 'text3'},{id:'text4', product: 'shampoo'}];    
var objectsFound = [];

for(var i = 0; i < Object.keys(productList).length; i++){
        for(var j = 0; j < Object.keys(theDatabaseList).length; j++){
        if(productList[i].id === theDatabaseList[j].id){
            objectsFound.push(productList[i].id);
        }       
    }
}
console.log(objectsFound);

To answer your exact question, if are just searching for a value in an object, you can use a single for in loop.

var vendors = [
    {
      Name: 'Magenic',
      ID: 'ABC'
     },
    {
      Name: 'Microsoft',
      ID: 'DEF'
    } 
];

for(var ojectNumbers in vendors){
    if(vendors[ojectNumbers].Name === 'Magenic'){
        console.log('object contains Magenic');
    }
}
|improve this answer|||||
0

Alternatively you can do:

const find = (key, needle) => return !!~vendors.findIndex(v => (v[key] === needle));
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    you'd better say why he can do that – Azzabi Haythem Mar 1 '18 at 20:43
0

var without2 = (arr, args) => arr.filter(v => v.id !== args.id); Example:

without2([{id:1},{id:1},{id:2}],{id:2})

Result: without2([{id:1},{id:1},{id:2}],{id:2})

|improve this answer|||||
  • I think you meant to say Result: [{id:1},{id:1}] – Isaac Pak Nov 26 '18 at 22:52
0
const a = [{one:2},{two:2},{two:4}]
const b = a.filter(val => "two" in val).length;
if (b) {
   ...
}
|improve this answer|||||
  • 3
    Please and some description and make sure the example you provide works.. (filter will not change the original array but clone it). – Moshe Simantov Nov 20 '19 at 17:06
-1

My approach to solving this problem is to use ES6 and creating a function that does the check for us. The benefit of this function is that it can be reusable through out your project to check any array of objects given the key and the value to check.

ENOUGH TALK, LET'S SEE THE CODE

Array

const ceos = [
  {
    name: "Jeff Bezos",
    company: "Amazon"
  }, 
  {
    name: "Mark Zuckerberg",
    company: "Facebook"
  }, 
  {
    name: "Tim Cook",
    company: "Apple"
  }
];

Function

const arrayIncludesInObj = (arr, key, valueToCheck) => {
  let found = false;

  arr.some(value => {
    if (value[key] === valueToCheck) {
      found = true;
      return true; // this will break the loop once found
    }
  });

  return found;
}

Call/Usage

const found = arrayIncludesInObj(ceos, "name", "Tim Cook"); // true

const found = arrayIncludesInObj(ceos, "name", "Tim Bezos"); // false
|improve this answer|||||
-4

I would rather go with regex.

If your code is as follows,

vendors = [
    {
      Name: 'Magenic',
      ID: 'ABC'
     },
    {
      Name: 'Microsoft',
      ID: 'DEF'
    }
];

I would recommend

/"Name":"Magenic"/.test(JSON.stringify(vendors))
|improve this answer|||||
  • 23
    Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems. – Craicerjack Oct 12 '16 at 15:38
  • File this under, just because you can do something, does not mean that you should. – Liam Aug 22 '18 at 9:14

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