27

I would like to test for the success/failure of a copy in a batch file, but I can't find any documentation on what if any errorlevel codes are returned. For example

copy x y
if %errorlevel%. equ 1. (
    echo Copy x y failed due to ...
    exit /B
) else (
  if %errorlevel% equ 2. (
      echo Copy x y failed due to ...
      exit /B
   )
... etc ...
)
  • 1
    You can quickly find that copy a.txt a.txt will return an errorlevel unequal to zero, and copy a.txt b.txt will return an errorlevel of zero. But as others pointed out, xcopy gives more info. But if you don't need that info, just a success/fail, copy is just fine. – Abel Sep 28 '17 at 2:55
35

I'd opt for xcopy in this case since the error levels are documented (see xcopy documentation, paraphrased below):

Exit code  Description
=========  ===========
    0      Files were copied without error.
    1      No files were found to copy.
    2      The user pressed CTRL+C to terminate xcopy.
    4      Initialization error occurred. There is not
           enough memory or disk space, or you entered
           an invalid drive name or invalid syntax on
           the command line.
    5      Disk write error occurred.

In any case, xcopy is a far more powerful solution. The equivalent documentation for copy does not document the error levels.


As an aside, you may want to rethink your use of the %errorlevel% variable. It has unexpected results, at least in some versions of Windows, if someone has explicitly done something silly like:

set errorlevel=22

In those cases, the actual variable will be used rather than grabbing the actual error level. The "normal" way of doing this is (in decreasing order since errorlevel is a "greater than or equal to" check):

if errorlevel 2 (
    echo Copy x y failed due to reason 2
    exit /B

)
if errorlevel 1 (
    echo Copy x y failed due to reason 1
    exit /B
)

In addition, if you are running Win7 or Win Server 2008 or later, you should look into Robocopy, which is now the preferred mass-copy solution.

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  • 6
    It is easier to do that checking this way: for %%e in (5 4 3 2 1) do if errorlevel %%e goto reason-%%e followed by echo Copy OK – Aacini Nov 22 '11 at 0:48
  • 1
    @HarryJohnston: XCOPY does not return a negative errorlevel. The standard is: If executed OK: return 0, if end because any error: return a value greater than 0. – Aacini Nov 22 '11 at 18:05
  • 2
    @HarryJohnston: It is IMPOSSIBLE for XCOPY to return a negative errorlevel because the possible range is from 0 to 255 (one byte). Indeed, it is impossible for any external executable file to return a negative errorlevel value in Windows/DOS environment. The only internal cmd.exe command capable to do so is EXIT /B exitcode that use a nonstandard, undocumented method to set a 32-bits signed value. However, I will offer you an apology if you show me any documentation on how to return a negative errorlevel (a value larger than a byte) from an executable program in Windows/DOS environment. – Aacini Nov 23 '11 at 1:47
  • 1
    @Aacini: See ExitProcess (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/…). DOS has nothing to do with it, by the way; on Windows, XCOPY is a Win32 application, not a DOS application. – Harry Johnston Nov 23 '11 at 3:41
  • 3
    Compile the following Java program public class testprog{public static void main(String x[]){System.exit(-123);}} then run it. After that, echo %errorlevel% will indeed show -123. Not that all this matters for xcopy which is documented to only return 0 or greater, so perhaps the discussion should be taken elsewhere :-) – paxdiablo Nov 23 '11 at 8:01
17

It might also be worth pointing out that xcopy doesn't always return the error code you expect.

For example when trying to copy multiple files with a wildcard but there are no files to copy you expect a return error code of 1 ("No files were found to copy"), but it actually returns 0 ("Files were copied without error")

C:\Users\wilson>mkdir bla

C:\Users\wilson>mkdir blert

C:\Users\wilson>xcopy bla\* blert\
0 File(s) copied

C:\Users\wilson>echo %ERRORLEVEL%
0
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  • 1
    Mathematical logic: sum(0) = 0. Not that there isn't an argument for the reverse, but copying nothing is, imo, definitely not a failure condition: a list of zero operations always succeeds (think LINQ or other SQL queries, it isn't an error if the resultset is empty). – Abel Sep 28 '17 at 2:53
  • 3
    Yea, I know. Logically, a return code of zero is probably correct. But when you consider the return code description "Files were copied without error" then I would expect a non-zero return code for this situation. – Wilson Waters Sep 28 '17 at 3:00
  • 1
    Maybe xcopy needs a 6th return code: 5 - files were not copied without error. That would take away any confusion, right? – Wilson Waters Sep 28 '17 at 3:03
11

I believe Copy only returns 0 for success or 1 for failure.

XCopy has documented return codes:

0 = Files were copied without error.
1 = No files were found to copy.
2 = The user pressed CTRL+C to terminate xcopy.
4 = Initialization error occurred. There is not enough memory or disk space, or you entered an invalid drive name or invalid syntax on the command line.
5 = Disk write error occurred.

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1

There is also one point I would like to emphasize: xcopy as well as robocopy can only copy files, but they can't rename them.
While looking at the original situation (copy x y, which looks like a rename to me), I have the impression that the copy command still is the only one suitable for this purpose.

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  • I didn't realize that. The copy x y was arbitrary, I did not mean to imply renames only. I've been using the 0 and 1 return codes with copy and they work fine. – Bill Ruppert Dec 15 '15 at 14:34
  • 1
    Actually you can rename files with XCOPY, I've done with for years with scripts from the past.... ECHO F | XCOPY /Y /F "C:\Path\OrigFileName.txt" "C:\Path\NewFileName.txt" – Bitcoin Murderous Maniac Feb 18 '17 at 20:15
-1
Error# Description 
0 No error 
1 Not owner 
2 No such file or directory 
3 Interrupted system call 
4 I/O error 
5 Bad file number 
6 No more processes 
7 Not enough core memory 
8 Permission denied 
9 Bad address 
10 File exists 
11 No such device 
12 Not a directory 
13 Is a directory 
14 File table overflow 
15 Too many open files 
16 File too large 
17 No space left on device 
18 Directory not empty 
999 Unmapped error (ABL default) 

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