I have a question regarding NULL in PHP:

  $a = '';
  if($a == NULL) {
      echo 'is null';
  }

Why do I see is null when $a is an empty string? Is that a bug?

up vote 274 down vote accepted

What you're looking for is:

if($variable === NULL) {...}

PHP treats NULL, false, 0, and the empty string as equal.

  • 6
    False, your condition only matches uninitialized and null $variable. What you want is actually: $variable == null (note the ==) – Thomas LAURENT Aug 24 '16 at 18:33
  • 6
    @ThomasLAURENT, that's what the OP was looking for, they were wondering why == null was matching the empty string and not just null or undefined. – Godwin Aug 24 '16 at 18:51
  • 2
    Oups my mistake, but your last sentence led me think NULL, false, 0 and "" were strictly equal which is wrong, sorry for the misunderstanding. – Thomas LAURENT Aug 25 '16 at 21:06
  • I noticed this answer is from 2011. Is this still true in 2016? – James Oct 25 '16 at 19:28
  • 2
    @James it's an intended behaviour in PHP, it's still true even in 2017 and will be true for a long time I suppose – Defrag Feb 23 '17 at 3:09

As is shown in the following table, empty($foo) is equivalent to $foo==null and is_null($foo) has the same function of $foo===null. The table also shows some tricky values regarding the null comparison. (ϕ denotes an uninitialized variables. )

I never use empty() and is_null() functions. Using simple comparison is less ambiguous, faster and cleaner.

         empty    is_null 
         ==null  ===null  isset   array_key_exists
      ϕ |   T   |   T   |   F   |   F   
   null |   T   |   T   |   F   |   T   
     "" |   T   |   F   |   T   |   T   
     [] |   T   |   F   |   T   |   T
      0 |   T   |   F   |   T   |   T      
  false |   T   |   F   |   T   |   T   
   true |   F   |   F   |   T   |   T   
      1 |   F   |   F   |   T   |   T   
     \0 |   F   |   F   |   T   |   T   
  • 2
    Missing "0" and "0.0" in the table. They make things really tricky, especially empty(). That's why I avoid using empty(). – datasn.io Jun 24 '15 at 4:26
  • 1
    @PHPst Base on the table that you shown, so what is actually the php code of what you called 'simple comparison'? – Chetabahana Feb 9 '16 at 12:57
  • @hyip ==nulland ===null. – PHPst Feb 9 '16 at 13:00
  • This should be the top answer, much more complete. Thanks. – pgr Mar 30 '17 at 8:41
  • @kavoir.com May please point out what is tricky for 0.0 please? It acts as 0. – PHPst Apr 3 '17 at 0:12

check == vs ===

'' == NULL would return true
0 == NULL would return true
false == null would return true

where as

'' === NULL would return false
0 === NULL would return false
false === NULL would return false

No it's not a bug. Have a look at the Loose comparisons with == table (second table), which shows the result of comparing each value in the first column with the values in the other columns:

    TRUE    FALSE   1       0       -1      "1"     "0"     "-1"    NULL    array() "php"   ""

    [...]    

""  FALSE   TRUE    FALSE   TRUE    FALSE   FALSE   FALSE   FALSE   TRUE    FALSE   FALSE   TRUE

There you can see that an empty string "" compared with false, 0, NULL or "" will yield true.

You might want to use is_null [docs] instead, or strict comparison (third table).

  • The Loose comparisons table seems to suggest that comparing 0=="php" or "php"==0 will both yield true. What is going on there? – Robert Nov 27 '13 at 21:52
  • 1
    @Robert: A string not starting with digits is converted to 0 when cast to a string: codepad.org/qi40SG3E. So (int)"php" == 0. – Felix Kling Nov 27 '13 at 21:58
  • @Robert: I meant "when cast to a number". – Felix Kling Nov 28 '13 at 0:23

This is not a bug but PHP normal behavior. It happens because the == operator in PHP doesn't check for type.

'' == null == 0 == false

If you want also to check if the values have the same type, use === instead. To study in deep this difference, please read the official documentation.

If you use ==, php treats an empty string or array as null. To make the distinction between null and empty, either use === or is_null. So:

if($a === NULL) or if(is_null($a))

  • if($a === NULL) – Caster Dec 7 '17 at 12:57

Use empty - http://php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php.

Example:

$a = '';
if(empty($a)) {
    echo 'is empty';
}

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