233

I have a question regarding NULL in PHP:

  $a = '';
  if($a == NULL) {
      echo 'is null';
  }

Why do I see is null when $a is an empty string? Is that a bug?

0

10 Answers 10

383

What you're looking for is:

if($variable === NULL) {...}

Note the ===.
When use ==, as you did, PHP treats NULL, false, 0, the empty string, and empty arrays as equal.

8
  • 14
    False, your condition only matches uninitialized and null $variable. What you want is actually: $variable == null (note the ==) Aug 24, 2016 at 18:33
  • 9
    @ThomasLAURENT, that's what the OP was looking for, they were wondering why == null was matching the empty string and not just null or undefined.
    – Godwin
    Aug 24, 2016 at 18:51
  • 3
    Oups my mistake, but your last sentence led me think NULL, false, 0 and "" were strictly equal which is wrong, sorry for the misunderstanding. Aug 25, 2016 at 21:06
  • 3
    @James it's an intended behaviour in PHP, it's still true even in 2017 and will be true for a long time I suppose
    – Defrag
    Feb 23, 2017 at 3:09
  • 1
    $a = '' is an empty string, false is a boolean, $a = 0; is an integer and null is from type null. What OP is telling is that PHP will thread them as "same" in value, but not as "same" in type. So a strict === check will also check for type and fail if you use different ones. That's the reason you should be consistence in your return values. If you normaly return a string in a method like getName(), you shouldn't get null when it's empty, but more likely an emtpy string $user->getName() === '' or $user->getId() === 0 or $user->isActive === false. Intended behaviour! May 23, 2017 at 12:32
258

As is shown in the following table, empty($foo) is equivalent to $foo==null and is_null($foo) has the same function of $foo===null. The table also shows some tricky values regarding the null comparison. (ϕ denotes an uninitialized variables. )

         empty    is_null 
         ==null  ===null  isset   array_key_exists
      ϕ |   T   |   T   |   F   |   F   
   null |   T   |   T   |   F   |   T   
     "" |   T   |   F   |   T   |   T   
     [] |   T   |   F   |   T   |   T
      0 |   T   |   F   |   T   |   T      
  false |   T   |   F   |   T   |   T   
   true |   F   |   F   |   T   |   T   
      1 |   F   |   F   |   T   |   T   
     \0 |   F   |   F   |   T   |   T   
6
  • 3
    Missing "0" and "0.0" in the table. They make things really tricky, especially empty(). That's why I avoid using empty().
    – datasn.io
    Jun 24, 2015 at 4:26
  • 1
    @PHPst Base on the table that you shown, so what is actually the php code of what you called 'simple comparison'?
    – eQ19
    Feb 9, 2016 at 12:57
  • @hyip ==nulland ===null. Feb 9, 2016 at 13:00
  • 1
    This should be the top answer, much more complete. Thanks.
    – pgr
    Mar 30, 2017 at 8:41
  • @PHPst You said that simple comparison is less ambiguous. Can you please provide an example of using simple comparison instead of these NULL empty() etc. Jan 24, 2018 at 19:15
35

check == vs ===

'' == NULL would return true
0 == NULL would return true
false == null would return true

where as

'' === NULL would return false
0 === NULL would return false
false === NULL would return false

1
  • Tested and correct. ''==null (true) while ''===null(false) Jun 16, 2018 at 13:52
20

No it's not a bug. Have a look at the Loose comparisons with == table (second table), which shows the result of comparing each value in the first column with the values in the other columns:

    TRUE    FALSE   1       0       -1      "1"     "0"     "-1"    NULL    array() "php"   ""

    [...]    

""  FALSE   TRUE    FALSE   TRUE    FALSE   FALSE   FALSE   FALSE   TRUE    FALSE   FALSE   TRUE

There you can see that an empty string "" compared with false, 0, NULL or "" will yield true.

You might want to use is_null [docs] instead, or strict comparison (third table).

3
  • The Loose comparisons table seems to suggest that comparing 0=="php" or "php"==0 will both yield true. What is going on there?
    – Robert
    Nov 27, 2013 at 21:52
  • 1
    @Robert: A string not starting with digits is converted to 0 when cast to a string: codepad.org/qi40SG3E. So (int)"php" == 0. Nov 27, 2013 at 21:58
  • @Robert: I meant "when cast to a number". Nov 28, 2013 at 0:23
13

This is not a bug but PHP normal behavior. It happens because the == operator in PHP doesn't check for type.

'' == null == 0 == false

If you want also to check if the values have the same type, use === instead. To study in deep this difference, please read the official documentation.

10

PHP 7 isset() vs empty() vs is_null()

enter image description here

9

If you use ==, php treats an empty string or array as null. To make the distinction between null and empty, either use === or is_null. So:

if($a === NULL) or if(is_null($a))

1
0

Just to addon if someone is dealing with  , this would work if dealing with  .

Replace it with str_replace() first and check it with empty()

empty(str_replace(" " ,"" , $YOUR_DATA)) ? $YOUR_DATA = '--' : $YOUR_DATA;
0

NULL stands for a variable without value. To check if a variable is NULL you can either use is_null($var) or the comparison (===) with NULL. Both ways, however, generate a warning if the variable is not defined. Similar to isset($var) and empty($var), which can be used as functions.

var_dump(is_null($var)); // true
var_dump($var === null); // true
var_dump(empty($var)); // true

Read more in How to check if a variable is NULL in PHP?

-1

Use empty - http://php.net/manual/en/function.empty.php.

Example:

$a = '';
if(empty($a)) {
    echo 'is empty';
}

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.