9

On the past few projects of mine I've run into situations where I need to pass multiple parameters to a Threading.Timer callback method. Unfortunately, the constructor only accepts a single object parameter. Not wanting to use global variables, the pattern I've started using to overcome this problem is to pass in an anonymous method when the timer is created and use the compiler's ability to capture variables to my advantage, like so:

public void SendEmailsRepeatedly(IEnumerable<SimpleEmail> emails, int sendRepeatedlyDelayMS)
{
    Tokenizer tokenizer = new StandardTokenizer();

    sendRepeatedlyTimer = new Timer(
        SendRepeatedlyCallback,
        (Action)delegate()
        {
            TokenizeAndSendEmails(emails, tokenizer);
        },
        0,
        sendRepeatedlyDelayMS);
}

private void SendRepeatedlyCallback(object state)
{
    if (!abort)
    {
        Action sendEmails = (Action)state;
        sendEmails();
    }
}

So my question is, is this a flagrant hack? Is there a better or recommended way to do this?

5 Answers 5

8

As a case you can encapsulate all parameters by a class:

public sealed class SendEmailParameters
{
    public int RepeatCount { get; private set; }
    ...
}

private void SendRepeatedlyCallback(object state)
{
    var parameters = (SendEmailParameters)state;

    // ...
}
4
  • 2
    I'm going to give it to you because this is probably the most "readable" approach, and I'm sure that my coworkers are confused enough already with most of my code. Commented Nov 23, 2011 at 16:30
  • 1
    I don't see any benefit in this. Why create a class yourself when the compiler can do all this boilerplate work for you?
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Nov 23, 2011 at 17:04
  • 3
    @Jon You have a point and I'm also a fan of pushing the pedal to the metal with the compiler. However I also think that there are some situations where it's good to make the code a little more verbose just so that other people can understand it without difficulty. Conversely, it could be argued that I should just add more inline comments. Commented Nov 25, 2011 at 21:27
  • 1
    @RepoMan: I wouldn't do either - I'd educate my colleagues about lambda expressions. I don't think there's anything really complex when it comes to my solution - if you understand lambda expressions, it's pretty simple code. Understanding lambda expressions then brings about far more benefits than just this situation. They're handy all over the place. I don't like "clever" code either - but in this case I don't think it's really that clever.
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Nov 25, 2011 at 21:29
6

That's absolutely fine. As of C# 3 I'd use a lambda expression instead, personally - and use a separate local variable to avoid the cast in the middle of a method:

public void SendEmailsRepeatedly(IEnumerable<SimpleEmail> emails,
                                 int sendRepeatedlyDelayMS)
{
    Tokenizer tokenizer = new StandardTokenizer();
    Action action = () => TokenizeAndSendEmails(emails, tokenizer);    
    sendRepeatedlyTimer = new Timer(SendRepeatedlyCallback, action, 0,
                                    sendRepeatedlyDelayMS);
}
5
  • Very impressive. I'm a little confused as to why it's bad to cast in the middle of the method? Is this just for readability's sake or will it cause actual problems? Commented Nov 23, 2011 at 16:22
  • 3
    @RepoMan: It's "just" for the sake of readability - but that's a big "just" from my point of view :)
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented Nov 23, 2011 at 17:02
  • @JonSkeet is it possible for you to add a full code example of your solution? I don't mean to be a pain but would love a clear picture of what you are suggesting in your example. Is Tokenizer a built in framework class? If so show us using statements for namespaces to use. I understand the lambda expressions but I'm confused about things like Tokenizer, StandardTokenizer, Action, TokenizeAndSendEmails, etc. Just trying to completely understand your solution so I can use it.
    – Arvo Bowen
    Commented May 18, 2022 at 15:03
  • @ArvoBowen: Those are all parts of the original question. They're not really relevant to the "do something repeatedly" part, which is focused on Timer and providing a delegate. And I'm not going to go back and do a lot of work on a question which is over 10 years old...
    – Jon Skeet
    Commented May 18, 2022 at 17:03
  • @JonSkeet fair enough, I didn't even realize the question was missing that much in the example. I targeted the wrong person. :)
    – Arvo Bowen
    Commented May 18, 2022 at 19:29
1

Are they known parameters? Then send a purpose built object with all the properties you need.

1

This is fine. You can also construct your own type and use that to contain that parameters that you want to pass in to your callback. Just cast the 'object state' parameter to the type that you have constructed and read off the properties from your type.

1

You could create a class that encapsulates all of the arguments you need to pass, or you could use a lambda expression. Something like this should be pretty close:

public void SendEmailsRepeatedly(IEnumerable<string> emails, int sendRepeatedlyDelayMS)
{
    AutoResetEvent resetEvent = new AutoResetEvent(false);      
    Tokenizer tokenizer = new StandardTokenizer();        

    var timer = new Timer(x => SendRepeatedlyCallback(x, emails, tokenizer), resetEvent, 0, sendRepeatedlyDelayMS);
}

static void SendRepeatedlyCallback(object state, IEnumerable<string> emails, StandardTokenizer tokenizer)
{
    ...
}

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