96

I am using Tasks to run long running server calls in my ViewModel and the results are marshalled back on Dispatcher using TaskScheduler.FromSyncronizationContext(). For example:

var context = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
this.Message = "Loading...";
Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { ... })
            .ContinueWith(x => this.Message = "Completed"
                          , context);

This works fine when I execute the application. But when I run my NUnit tests on Resharper I get the error message on the call to FromCurrentSynchronizationContext as:

The current SynchronizationContext may not be used as a TaskScheduler.

I guess this is because the tests are run on worker threads. How can I ensure the tests are run on main thread ? Any other suggestions are welcome.

  • in my case I was using TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() inside a lambda and execution was deferred to another thread. getting the context outside lambda fixed the problem. – M.kazem Akhgary Dec 27 '18 at 23:13
139

You need to provide a SynchronizationContext. This is how I handle it:

[SetUp]
public void TestSetUp()
{
  SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(new SynchronizationContext());
}
  • 6
    For MSTest: put the code above in the Method marked with the ClassInitializeAttribute. – Daniel Bişar Jul 9 '13 at 15:36
  • 5
    @SACO: Actually, I have to put it in a the method with TestInitializeAttribute, otherwise only the first test passes. – Thorarin Oct 14 '13 at 12:21
  • i'm using ncrunch, perhaps that's the problem? – tofutim Dec 10 '13 at 2:09
  • 2
    For xunit tests, I put it in the static type ctor, since it only needs to be setup once per fixture. – codekaizen Aug 14 '14 at 23:57
  • 3
    I do not understand at all why this answer was accepted as the solution. IT DOES NOT WORK. And the reason is simple: SynchronizationContext is a dummy class whose send/post function are useless. This class should be abstract rather than a concrete class that possibly leads people into a false sense of "it's working". @tofutim You probably want to provide your own implementation derived from SyncContext. – h9uest Mar 2 '15 at 17:07
21

Ritch Melton's solution did not work for me. This is because my TestInitialize function is async, as are my tests, so with every await the current SynchronizationContext is lost. This is because as MSDN points out, the SynchronizationContext class is "dumb" and just queues all work to the thread pool.

What worked for me is actually just skipping over the FromCurrentSynchronizationContext call when there isn't a SynchronizationContext (that is, if the current context is null). If there's no UI thread, I don't need to synchronize with it in the first place.

TaskScheduler syncContextScheduler;
if (SynchronizationContext.Current != null)
{
    syncContextScheduler = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
}
else
{
    // If there is no SyncContext for this thread (e.g. we are in a unit test
    // or console scenario instead of running in an app), then just use the
    // default scheduler because there is no UI thread to sync with.
    syncContextScheduler = TaskScheduler.Current;
}

I found this solution more straightforward than the alternatives, which where:

  • Pass a TaskScheduler to the ViewModel (via dependency injection)
  • Create a test SynchronizationContext and a "fake" UI thread for the tests to run on - way more trouble for me that it's worth

I lose some of the threading nuance, but I am not explicitly testing that my OnPropertyChanged callbacks trigger on a specific thread so I am okay with that. The other answers using new SynchronizationContext() don't really do any better for that goal anyway.

  • Your else case will fail also in a windows service app, resulting syncContextScheduler == null – FindOutIslamNow Jul 10 '17 at 10:10
  • Came across the same problem, but instead I read the NUnit source code. AsyncToSyncAdapter only overrides your SynchronizationContext if it is running in a STA thread. A workaround is to mark your class with a [RequiresThread] attribute. – Aron Jul 30 at 7:34
1

I have combined multiple solution to have guarantee for working SynchronizationContext:

using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

public class CustomSynchronizationContext : SynchronizationContext
{
    public override void Post(SendOrPostCallback action, object state)
    {
        SendOrPostCallback actionWrap = (object state2) =>
        {
            SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(new CustomSynchronizationContext());
            action.Invoke(state2);
        };
        var callback = new WaitCallback(actionWrap.Invoke);
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(callback, state);
    }
    public override SynchronizationContext CreateCopy()
    {
        return new CustomSynchronizationContext();
    }
    public override void Send(SendOrPostCallback d, object state)
    {
        base.Send(d, state);
    }
    public override void OperationStarted()
    {
        base.OperationStarted();
    }
    public override void OperationCompleted()
    {
        base.OperationCompleted();
    }

    public static TaskScheduler GetSynchronizationContext() {
      TaskScheduler taskScheduler = null;

      try
      {
        taskScheduler = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
      } catch {}

      if (taskScheduler == null) {
        try
        {
          taskScheduler = TaskScheduler.Current;
        } catch {}
      }

      if (taskScheduler == null) {
        try
        {
          var context = new CustomSynchronizationContext();
          SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(context);
          taskScheduler = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();
        } catch {}
      }

      return taskScheduler;
    }
}

Usage:

var context = CustomSynchronizationContext.GetSynchronizationContext();

if (context != null) 
{
    Task.Factory
      .StartNew(() => { ... })
      .ContinueWith(x => { ... }, context);
}
else 
{
    Task.Factory
      .StartNew(() => { ... })
      .ContinueWith(x => { ... });
}

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