140

Let's say I have the following files in my current directory:

buildBar.bat
buildFoo.bat
buildHouse.bat

And I type the following at my command prompt, ./bu and then TAB.

  • In Bash, it gets expanded to ./build

  • In PowerShell, it gets expanded to ./buildBar.bat -- the first item in the list.

  • In Cmd, the behavior is the same as PowerShell.

I prefer the Bash behaviour - is there a way to make PowerShell behave like Bash?

1
  • 13
    Yes - that's what I've been doing for the last decade or so, but I'm trying to transition to PowerShell, because I want to be able to fly on the command line on systems other than my own, where Cygwin isn't installed.
    – RobSiklos
    Nov 28 '11 at 13:41
232

New versions of PowerShell include PSReadline, which can be used to do this:

Set-PSReadlineKeyHandler -Key Tab -Function Complete

To make it permanent, put this command into C:\Users\[User]\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\profile.ps1.

12
  • 54
    MenuComplete instead of Complete is more like bash, it lets you use the arrow keys to choose from the available options
    – stib
    Aug 17 '17 at 2:28
  • 1
    @LeBleu That's weird, because my brand new Windows 10 machine came with PSReadline. I thought the module was from Microsoft. Nov 9 '17 at 17:59
  • 13
    BTW, if the profile.ps1 file does not exist on your machine, you can generate one with a command new-item $profile -itemtype file -force
    – Reinis
    Dec 12 '17 at 12:09
  • 3
    It is very likely that your machine will not have C:\Users\[User]\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\profile.ps1. You actually need to run new-item $profile -itemtype file -force
    – R.F
    Jan 18 '19 at 0:34
  • 10
    That's a really inconvenient spelling for touch :-(
    – SamB
    May 15 '19 at 2:59
29

It is now possible to get PowerShell to do Bash-style completion, using PSReadline.

Check out blog post Bash-like tab completion in PowerShell.

2
17

tab only completes the command name not its previous arguments/parameters.

to also autocomplete the complete command with arguments from history set the below keybinding.

Set-PSReadlineKeyHandler -Key UpArrow -Function HistorySearchBackward
Set-PSReadlineKeyHandler -Key DownArrow -Function HistorySearchForward

Now, type few characters of command name and use up/down arrow to autocomplete this command (with arguments) from history.

real time saver.

15

Take a look here, not really your desiderata:

PowerTab

but I think is the best tab expansion feature for PowerShell console!!!

2
  • Interesting. If there's a way to do something like that, then it seems quite possible to make the expansion work like in bash. I'm far from being an expert in PowerShell, though, so may be missing something.
    – Andriy M
    Nov 25 '11 at 9:57
  • Sure! Start studying the PowerTab Module's code to try doing your expansion needs. But PowerTab offers expansions for almost any command, wmi, comobject, assembly with a easy selection way!
    – CB.
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:04
8
# keep or reset to powershell default
Set-PSReadlineKeyHandler -Key Shift+Tab -Function TabCompletePrevious

# define Ctrl+Tab like default Tab behavior
Set-PSReadlineKeyHandler -Key Ctrl+Tab -Function TabCompleteNext

# define Tab like bash
Set-PSReadlineKeyHandler -Key Tab -Function Complete
5

Modify the TabExpansion function to achieve what you want. Remember that perhaps it completes till the end if you press tab again the new suggestion modify from where you originally press the key. I strongly prefer the actual behaviour, I want the line writted as fast as possible. Finally don't forget the wildcard expansion, for example: bu*h[Tab] automatically completes to buildHouse.bat

1
  • Modifying the TabExpansion function is probably the way to go, still a lot more complicated than what I was looking for though. I think I'll need to get way more fluent in powershell before I'm able to mess around with that.
    – RobSiklos
    Nov 25 '11 at 14:18
4

With Powershell Core we can set the PredictionSource property for PSReadLine as History to get auto suggestion. Refer to the YouTube video for more details https://youtu.be/I0iIZe0dUNw

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