4

This maybe a related question: Java assignment issues - Is this atomic?

I have the same class as the OP that acts on a mutable string reference. But set rarely happens. (basically this string is part of a server configuration that only reloads when forced to).

public class Test {
 private String s;

 public void setS(String str){
  s = str;
 }

 public String getS(){
  return s;
 }
}

Multiple threads will be pounding this variable to read its value. What is the best method to make it 'safe' while not having to incur the performance degradation by declaring it volatile?

I am currently heading into the direction of ReadWriteLock, but as far as I understand, ReadWrite locks does not make it safe from thread caching? unless some syncronisation happen? Which means I've gone a full circle back to I may as well just use the volatile keyword?

Is my understanding correct? Is there nothing that can 'notify' other threads about an update to a variable in main memory manually such that they can update their local cache just once on a full moon?

volatile on this seems overkill given that the server application is designed to run for months without restart. By that time, it would've served a few million reads. I'm thinking I might as well just set the String as static final and not allow it mutate without a complete application and JVM restart.

4
  • 2
    I would measure the overhead of the volatile solution for your application first. If it is negligible, the question may be mute.
    – Ingo Kegel
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:06
  • I'm sure you're referring to "don't optimise if you don't have to". But it does not answer my question properly. Thanks for your comment anyway.
    – user986139
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:08
  • I'm with Ingo here: make it correct before making it fast. A volatile read is not what will make your app significantly less performant.
    – JB Nizet
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:18
  • Perhaps I should add a note to say this is for scientific (if you like) interest and not necessarily for application domain purposes?
    – user986139
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:21
2

Reads and writes to references are atomic. The problems you can incur is attempting to perform a read and a write (an update) or guaranteeing that after a write all thread see this change on the next read. However, only you can say what your requirements are.

When you use volatile, it requires a cache coherent copy be read or written. This doesn't require a copy be made to/from main memory as the caches communicate amongst themselves, even between sockets. There is a performance impact but it doesn't mean the caches are not used.

Even if the access did go all the way to main memory, you could still do millions of accesses per second.

2
  • Well the requirements are essentially to invalidate the local cache once a new reference is set in main memory without overhead of threads only retrieving from main memory due to the use of volatile. But more than that I was not sure if any of my understandings or assumptions were correct.
    – user986139
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:33
  • @RonaldChan, I have added some notes on the use of volatile. Nov 25 '11 at 12:17
0

Why a mutable String? Why not a Config class with a simple static String. When config is updated, you change this static reference, which is an atomic operation and won't be a problem for reading threads. You then have no synchronization, no locking penalties.

4
  • May I ask whether a static reference to Config class have to deal with thread caches? If so, I still have to declare volatile keyword to the static reference on the Config no? In order to make sure all gets gets the up-to-date reference to the up-to-date config class object?
    – user986139
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:05
  • Sorry but I don't know about "thread caches". I know that some very short-lived caching can sometimes happen on simple types (variable in JIT registers, JNI, etc...) but it seems to me that the basic principle of multi-threading is many processes that share the same memory (hence no cache). In your case, I would surmise that any caching on this config String would be extremely short lived and should not be a problem.
    – solendil
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:11
  • Unfortunately I have received, from the many articles on concurrency and as well as here on StackOverflow, conflicting arguments. That the local cache of a running thread is not guaranteed to read the up-to-date reference from the main memory ever. Unless a specific syncronisation step occurs.
    – user986139
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:15
  • 1
    @solendil: your assumptions are wrong. The caching might be longer than you think, and the reference should be made volatile or accessed in a synchronized way.
    – JB Nizet
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:16
0

In order to notify the clients to this server you can use observer pattern, who ever is interested in getting the info of server update can register for your event and server delivers the notification. This shouldnt become a bottleneck as you mentioned the reload is not often.

Now to make this thread safe you can have a separate thread handle the update of server state and if your get you check for the state if state is 'Updating' you wait for it to complete say you went to sleep. Once your update thread is done it should change the state from 'Updating' to 'Updated', once you come out of sleep check for the state if it is 'Updating' then go to sleep or else start servicing the request.

This approach will add an extra if in your code but then it will enable you to reload the cache without forcing application restart.

Also this shouldnt be a bottleneck as server update is not frequent.

Hope this makes some sense.

0

In order to avoid the volatile keyword, you could add a "memory barrier" method to your Test class that is only called very rarely, for example

public synchronized void sync() {
}

This will force the thread to re-read the field value from main memory.

Also, you would have to change the setter to

 public synchronized void setS(String str){
    s = str;
 }

The synchronized keyword will force the setting thread to write directly to main memory.

See here for a detailed explanation of synchronization and memory barriers.

3
  • Am I right to assume that the sync method must be polled on a regular basis by each thread? I was hoping for a way to 'push' the changes to local cache.
    – user986139
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:32
  • AFAIK, you cannot push anything into the local cache of another thread. The thread has to do encounter a memory barrier itself.
    – Ingo Kegel
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:45
  • +1 anyway as it is a viable alternative if I did not require changes to propagate immediately. I may have hit a Java roadblock.
    – user986139
    Nov 25 '11 at 10:46

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