11

I wanted to get a vector of distances between adjacent points in a vector:

struct Point { double x, y, z; } 

vector<double> adjacent_distances( vector<Point> points ) {
    ...
}

I thought that stl::adjacent_difference() would do the trick for me if I simply provided a function that finds the distance between 2 points:

double point_distance( Point a, Point b ) {
     return magnitude(a-b);  // implementation details are unimportant 
}

Thus, I was hoping that this would work,

vector<double> adjacent_distances( vector<Point> points ) 
{
    vector<double> distances;

    std::adjacent_difference( points.begin(), points.end(), 
                        std::back_inserter(distances), 
                        ptr_fun( point_distance ) );
    return distances; 
}

only to find that input and output vectors had to be of (practically) the same type because adjacent_difference() calls

 output[0] = input[0];            // forces input and output to be of same value_type 
 output[1] = op( input[1], input[0] ); 
 output[2] = op( input[2], input[1] ); 
 ....

which, sadly, is inconsistent with respect to how std::adjacent_find() works.

So, I had to convert my code to

double magnitude( Point pt );
Point  difference( Point a, Point b ); // implements b-a

vector<double> adjacent_distances( vector<Point> points ) 
{
    vector<Point> differences;

    std::adjacent_difference( points.begin(), points.end(), 
                        std::back_inserter(differences), 
                        ptr_fun( point_difference ) ); 


    vector<double> distances;

    std::transform( differences.begin(), differences.end(),
                        std::back_inserter(distances), 
                        ptr_fun( magnitude ) );

    return distances; 
}

NB: the first element of differences had to be removed for the function to behave correctly, but I skipped the implementation details, for brevity.

Question: is there a way I could achieve some transformation implicitly, so that I don't have to create the extra vector, and achieve a call to adjacent_difference() with input_iterator and output_iterator of different value_types ?

2
  • 3
    +1 from me for making me realize that std::adjacent_difference implements a different algorithm than I thought it would (I'd have expect that the range generated by the algorithm is one element shorter than the input range...). Nov 25 '11 at 13:49
  • Given the description of the problem probably you want to pass that std::vector by const ref and not by value.
    – 6502
    Nov 25 '11 at 23:53
4

Indeed that adjacent_difference algorithm is logically broken (why should be the difference of the same time of the elements? Why is the first output element equal to the first one instead of getting an output sequence one item shorter than the input one (way more logical)?

Anyway I don't understand why you are punishing yourself by using a functional approach with C++ where clearly the code is going to be harder to write, harder to read, slower to compile and not faster to execute. Oh.. and let's not talk about the kind of joke error message you are going to face if there is any error in what you type.

What is the bad part of

std::vector<double> distances;
for (int i=1,n=points.size(); i<n; i++)
    distances.push_back(magnitude(points[i] - points[i-1]));

?

This is shorter, more readable, faster to compile and may be even faster to execute.

EDIT

I wanted to check my subjective "shorter, more readable, faster to compile and may be faster to execute". Here the results:

~/x$ time for i in {1..10}
>   do
>     g++ -Wall -O2 -o algtest algtest.cpp
>   done

real    0m2.001s
user    0m1.680s
sys 0m0.150s
~/x$ time ./algtest

real    0m1.121s
user    0m1.100s
sys 0m0.010s
~/x$ time for i in {1..10}
>   do
>     g++ -Wall -O2 -o algtest2 algtest2.cpp
>   done

real    0m1.651s
user    0m1.230s
sys 0m0.190s
~/x$ time ./algtest2

real    0m0.941s
user    0m0.930s
sys 0m0.000s
~/x$ ls -latr algtest*.cpp
-rw-r--r-- 1 agriffini agriffini  932 2011-11-25 21:44 algtest2.cpp
-rw-r--r-- 1 agriffini agriffini 1231 2011-11-25 21:45 algtest.cpp
~/x$ 

The following is the accepted solution (I fixed what is clearly a brainfart of passing the vector of points by value).

// ---------------- algtest.cpp -------------
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <functional>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

using std::vector;
using std::ptr_fun;

struct Point
{
    double x, y;
    Point(double x, double y) : x(x), y(y)
    {
    }

    Point operator-(const Point& other) const
    {
        return Point(x - other.x, y - other.y);
    }
};

double magnitude(const Point& a)
{
    return sqrt(a.x*a.x + a.y*a.y);
}

double point_distance(const Point& a, const Point& b)
{
    return magnitude(b - a);
}

vector<double> adjacent_distances( const vector<Point>& points ) {
    if ( points.empty() ) return vector<double>();

    vector<double> distances(
      1, point_distance( *points.begin(), *points.begin() ) );

    std::transform( points.begin(), points.end() - 1,
                    points.begin() + 1,
                    std::back_inserter(distances),
                    ptr_fun( point_distance ) );
    return distances;
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<Point> points;
    for (int i=0; i<1000; i++)
        points.push_back(Point(100*cos(i*2*3.141592654/1000),
                               100*sin(i*2*3.141592654/1000)));

    for (int i=0; i<100000; i++)
    {
        adjacent_distances(points);
    }

    return 0;
}

Here is instead the explicit loop solution; it requires two include less, one function definition less and the function body is also shorter.

// ----------------------- algtest2.cpp -----------------------
#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

#include <vector>

struct Point
{
    double x, y;
    Point(double x, double y) : x(x), y(y)
    {
    }

    Point operator-(const Point& other) const
    {
        return Point(x - other.x, y - other.y);
    }
};

double magnitude(const Point& a)
{
    return sqrt(a.x*a.x + a.y*a.y);
}

std::vector<double> adjacent_distances(const std::vector<Point>& points)
{
    std::vector<double> distances;
    if (points.size()) distances.reserve(points.size()-1);
    for (int i=1,n=points.size(); i<n; i++)
        distances.push_back(magnitude(points[i] - points[i-1]));
    return distances;
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<Point> points;
    for (int i=0; i<1000; i++)
        points.push_back(Point(100*cos(i*2*3.141592654/1000),
                               100*sin(i*2*3.141592654/1000)));

    for (int i=0; i<100000; i++)
    {
        adjacent_distances(points);
    }

    return 0;
}

Summary:

  1. code size is shorter (algtest2.cpp is less than 76% of algtest.cpp)
  2. compile time is better (algtest2.cpp requires less than 83% of algtest.cpp)
  3. execution time is better (algtest2.cpp runs in less than 85% of algtest.cpp)

So apparently on my system (not hand-picked) I was right on all points except execution speed (the one with "maybe") where to get from slightly slower to substantially faster I had to call reserve on the result array. Even with this optimization the code is of course shorter.

I also think that the fact that this version is more readable is also objective and not an opinion... but I'd be happy to be proven wrong by meeting someone that can understand what the functional thing is doing and that cannot understand what the explicit one is doing instead.

8
  • 1
    -1 from me for subjective "shorter, more readable, faster to compile and may be even faster to execute." without providing any numbers to prove it. I personally actually consider the functional version easier to read, since it nicely communicates what's happening (it's computing the differences of adjacent opints) while with a raw for loop, this behaviour is deeply hidden inside the loop body. Nov 25 '11 at 13:41
  • @FrerichRaabe Whereas I mostly agree with your comment, c'mon it's not really "deeply hidden inside the loop body"! If somebody doesn't understand what a for loop does, he's quite outside the intended audience, anyway. Nov 25 '11 at 15:02
  • @Christian Rau: Of course people know what 'for' loops do, but that's not sufficient here since it doesn't tell you what this loop does. 'for' only suggests (!) that some sort of iteration takes place, but the essence of the loop (it computes adjacent differences) is hidden in the middle. Nov 25 '11 at 15:07
  • Also note how this loop is not even right; it iterates way too often in case points is empty. Nov 25 '11 at 15:08
  • 1
    @FrerichRaabe: I can say that this code takes longer to compile from experience (it doesn't even need #include <algorithm>) and the same about execution speed. Shorter is not subjective... and in all honesty I think that whoever can read the functional one can read also this explicit one (the converse is not true). The problem with C++ (pre-1x) is that you are forced to put the inner operation away (local structures cannot be used in templates)... much better having it closer to where it's used than at toplevel. Also the loop is correct even when points is empty or has only one element.
    – 6502
    Nov 25 '11 at 18:21
3

Probably this isn't so neat though, in this specific case, std::transform with 2 input sequences might meet the purpose. For example:

vector<double> adjacent_distances( vector<Point> points ) {
    if ( points.empty() ) return vector<double>();

    vector<double> distances(
      1, point_distance( *points.begin(), *points.begin() ) );

    std::transform( points.begin(), points.end() - 1,
                    points.begin() + 1,
                    std::back_inserter(distances), 
                    ptr_fun( point_distance ) );
    return distances; 
}

Hope this helps

5
  • +1 Simple and working. No need for dogmatic use of std::adjacent_difference. Nov 25 '11 at 14:59
  • 2
    It's actually simple and broken: it doesn't work correctly if points is empty. Nov 25 '11 at 15:11
  • @FrerichRaabe: Oops, thanks for pointing out! Edited the answer. Hope it's correct this time. Nov 25 '11 at 15:55
  • @FrerichRaabe Ok, then just put an if before it. But it's leagues better than having an additional copy or writing some obscure wrapper iterator around the points (which clearly doesn't show the intention). Nov 25 '11 at 15:56
  • @6502: (assuming it's a comment to me) I copy-and-pasted the function's signature from the OP's code. Nov 25 '11 at 23:06
1

Yes, this can be done, but not easily. I don't think it's worth the effort, unless you really need to avoid the copy.

If you really want to do this, you can try creating your own iterator that iterates over the vector<Point> and a wrapper around Point.

The iterator class will dereference to an instance of the wrapper class. The wrapper class should support operator - or your distance function, and it should store the distance. You should then implement an operator for implicit conversion to double, which will be invoked when adjacent_difference attempts to assign the wrapper to the vector<double>.

I don't have time to go into detail, so if anything is unclear, I'll check back later or someone else can try to explain better. Below is an example of a wrapper that does this.

 struct Foo { 
     Foo(double value) { d = value; } 
     operator double() { return d; } 
     double d; 
 };

 Foo sub(const Foo& a, const Foo& b) {
     return Foo(a.d - b.d);
 }

 vector<Foo> values = {1, 2, 3, 5, 8}; 
 vector<double> dist; 
 adjacent_difference(values.begin(), values.end(), back_inserter(dist), sub);

 // dist = {1, 1, 1, 2, 3}
1
  • your answer is clear. I was just hoping for an elegant solution. It's a pity none there isn't any in STL already Nov 25 '11 at 13:08
1

This is maybe a bit dirty, but you could simply add

struct Point {
    double x,y,z;
    operator double() { return 0.0; }
};

or perhaps

struct Point {
    double x,y,z;
    operator double() { return sqrt(x*x + y*y + z*z); } // or whatever metric you are using
};

The effect being to set the first distance to 0, or the distance of the first point from the origin. However, I could imagine that you wouldn't want to pollute your Point struct with a rather arbitrary definition for conversion to double - in which case dauphic's wrapper is a cleaner solution.

1
  • I suppose I could create a Point wrapper and implement the operator double(), but yeah, it looks a bit too much. Nov 25 '11 at 13:04
1

Since you have no use for the first element returned by adjacent_difference, which is precisely the one giving trouble, you can write your own version of the algorithm, skipping that initial assignment:

template <class InputIterator, class OutputIterator, class BinaryOperation>
OutputIterator my_adjacent_difference(InputIterator first, InputIterator last,
                                      OutputIterator result,
                                      BinaryOperation binary_op)
{
  if (first != last)
  {
    InputIterator prev = first++; // To start
    while (first != last)
    {
      InputIterator val = first++;
      *result++ = binary_op(*val, *prev);
      prev = val;
    }
  }
  return result;
}

This should work, though you will be missing some STL optimisations.

6
  • 1
    I don't understand why they chose such a meaningless implementation for adjacent_difference(). This first element that is returned makes it so much less flexible. Nov 25 '11 at 13:09
  • 1
    @GrimFandango: The idea of adjacent_difference is to provide partial results based on accumulated. In this case, the partial results for the first interval is the same as the accumulated. Though what you say about flexibility is true. The algorithm might have asked for an optional initial value for calculating the first difference, and this would make it more flexible.
    – Gorpik
    Nov 25 '11 at 13:25
  • 1
    I'd rather use iterators instead of value_types. Otherwise you get in trouble when the copy is heavy or even unsupported. Nov 25 '11 at 14:55
  • @Gorpik: excuse me for asking, but where have you read that "The idea of adjacent_difference is to provide partial results based on accumulated." ? No pun intended, but I am not sure that I would agree with that. Nov 25 '11 at 15:35
  • @GrimFandango: adjacent_difference is the inverse operation of partial_sum. Maybe the name of this second operation is clearer. Of course, as with all algorithms in the STL, it can be generalised to do a variety of things.
    – Gorpik
    Nov 28 '11 at 9:22
0

I like the a) formulation of the problem, b) comparison of the execution times, c) my_adjacent_difference, d) self-comment that my_adjacent_difference may lack built-in optimizations. I agree that the Standard C++ adjacent_difference logic limits the algorithm's application and that the three lines loop-code is a solution, which many would go with. I reuse the idea to apply the algorithm transform and present the version in C++ 11 illustrating lambdas. Regards.

#include <iostream>             /* Standard C++ cout, cerr */
#include <vector>               /* Standard C++ vector */
#include <algorithm>            /* Standard C++ transform */
#include <iterator>             /* Standard C++ back_inserter */
#include <cmath>                /* Standard C++ sqrt */
#include <stdexcept>            /* Standard C++ exception */
using namespace std;            /* Standard C++ namespace */

struct Point {double x, y, z;}; // I would define this differently.

int main(int, char*[])
{
    try {
        const Point     points[] = {{0, 0, 0}, {1, 0, 0}, {1, 0, 3}};
        vector<double>  distances;
        transform(points + 1, points + sizeof(points) / sizeof(Point),
            points, back_inserter(distances),
            [](const Point& p1, const Point& p2)
            {
                double  dx = p2.x - p1.x;
                double  dy = p2.y - p1.y;
                double  dz = p2.z - p1.z;
                return  sqrt(dx * dx + dy * dy + dz * dz);
            });
        copy(distances.begin(), distances.end(),
            ostream_iterator<double>(cout, "\n"));
    }
    catch(const exception& e) {
        cerr    << e.what() << endl;
        return  -1;
    }
    catch(...) {
        cerr    << "Unknown exception" << endl;
        return  -2;
    }
    return  0;
}

The output:

1
3

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