For anchors that act like buttons (for example, Questions, Tags, Users, etc. at the top of the Stack Overflow page) or tabs, is there a CSS standard way to disable the highlighting effect if the user accidentally selects the text?

I realize this could be done with JavaScript, and a little googling yielded the Mozilla-only -moz-user-select option.

Is there a standard-compliant way to accomplish this with CSS, and if not, what is the "best practice" approach?

  • 7
    can elements within the element witch has highlighting disabled, have highlighting enabled with in css in the style or class attribute? or in other words, are there other values for -webkit-user-select ect. other than just none? – user659576 Mar 14 '11 at 21:18
  • 176
    'user-select'- Values: none | text | toggle | element | elements | all | inherit - w3.org/TR/2000/WD-css3-userint-20000216 – Blowsie Mar 21 '11 at 9:44
  • 5
    uihacker.blogspot.com/2011/12/… – Enve Dec 31 '12 at 15:19
  • 6
    Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/16600479/… = how to allow only some of the child elements to be selected – JK. May 17 '13 at 2:36
  • 8
    There a bug in some browsers where doing "Select All" (CTRL+A and CMD+A) still selects things. This can be fought with a transparent selection color: ::selection { background: transparent; } ::-moz-selection { background: transparent; } – DaAwesomeP Dec 12 '14 at 1:03

40 Answers 40

up vote 6574 down vote
+50

UPDATE January, 2017:

According to Can I use, the user-select is currently supported in all browsers except Internet Explorer 9 and earlier versions (but sadly still needs a vendor prefix).


All of the correct CSS variations are:

.noselect {
  -webkit-touch-callout: none; /* iOS Safari */
    -webkit-user-select: none; /* Safari */
     -khtml-user-select: none; /* Konqueror HTML */
       -moz-user-select: none; /* Firefox */
        -ms-user-select: none; /* Internet Explorer/Edge */
            user-select: none; /* Non-prefixed version, currently
                                  supported by Chrome and Opera */
}
<p>
  Selectable text.
</p>
<p class="noselect">
  Unselectable text.
</p>


Note that it's a non-standard feature (i.e. not a part of any specification). It is not guaranteed to work everywhere, and there might be differences in implementation among browsers and in the future browsers can drop support for it.


More information can be found in Mozilla Developer Network documentation.

  • 34
    nice code molokoloco :D , although I personally would stay well away from using it, as sometimes you may need the values different for different browsers, and it relys on JavaScript. Making a class and adding it to your element or applying the css to your type of element in your style-sheet is pretty bullet proof. – Blowsie Jan 14 '11 at 13:07
  • 52
    'user-select'- Values: none | text | toggle | element | elements | all | inherit - w3.org/TR/2000/WD-css3-userint-20000216 – Blowsie Mar 21 '11 at 9:44
  • 33
    Actually -o-user-select isn't implemented in Opera. It implements IE's unselectable attribute instead. – Tim Down Jul 3 '11 at 10:52
  • 29
    For some reason, this alone wasnt working in IE8, I then added <div onselectstart="return false;"> to my main div. – robasta Jan 20 '12 at 8:11
  • 277
    this is ridiculous! so many different ways to do the same thing. let's make a new standard for user selects. we will call it standard-user-select. then we won't have these problems. although for backwards compatibility we should include the others as well. so now the code becomes -webkit-touch-callout: none; -webkit-user-select: none; -khtml-user-select: none; -moz-user-select: none; -ms-user-select: none; user-select: none; standard-user-select: none;. ah, much better. – Claudiu Sep 4 '12 at 16:19
up vote 760 down vote
+50

In most browsers, this can be achieved using proprietary variations on the CSS user-select property, originally proposed and then abandoned in CSS3 and now proposed in CSS UI Level 4:

*.unselectable {
   -moz-user-select: none;
   -khtml-user-select: none;
   -webkit-user-select: none;

   /*
     Introduced in IE 10.
     See http://ie.microsoft.com/testdrive/HTML5/msUserSelect/
   */
   -ms-user-select: none;
   user-select: none;
}

For IE < 10 and Opera < 15, you will need to use the unselectable attribute of the element you wish to be unselectable. You can set this using an attribute in HTML:

<div id="foo" unselectable="on" class="unselectable">...</div>

Sadly this property isn't inherited, meaning you have to put an attribute in the start tag of every element inside the <div>. If this is a problem, you could instead use JavaScript to do this recursively for an element's descendants:

function makeUnselectable(node) {
    if (node.nodeType == 1) {
        node.setAttribute("unselectable", "on");
    }
    var child = node.firstChild;
    while (child) {
        makeUnselectable(child);
        child = child.nextSibling;
    }
}

makeUnselectable(document.getElementById("foo"));

Update 30 April 2014: This tree traversal needs to be re-run whenever a new element is added to the tree, but it seems from a comment by @Han that it is possible to avoid this by adding a mousedown event handler that sets unselectable on the target of the event. See http://jsbin.com/yagekiji/1 for details.


This still doesn't cover all possibilities. While it is impossible to initiate selections in unselectable elements, in some browsers (IE and Firefox, for example) it's still impossible to prevent selections that start before and end after the unselectable element without making the whole document unselectable.

  • 27
    you should remove the * selector from your example, its really in-efficient and there really isnt any need to use it in your example is there? – Blowsie Jan 14 '11 at 13:15
  • 62
    @Blowsie: I don't think so: the CSS 2 spec states that *.foo and .foo are precisely equivalent (in the second case, the universal selector (*) is implied), so barring browser quirks, I can't see that including the * will harm performance. It's a long-standing habit of mine to include the *, which I originally started doing for readability: it explicitly states at a glance that the author intends to match all elements. – Tim Down Jan 14 '11 at 13:24
  • 34
    oooh after some further reading, it seems * is only un-effiecient when using it as the key (the righmost selector) ie .unselectable * . Further info here code.google.com/speed/page-speed/docs/… – Blowsie Jan 14 '11 at 13:49
  • 18
    Instead of using the class="unselectable", just use the attribute selector [unselectable="on"] { … } – Chris Calo Jan 26 '12 at 19:39
  • 12
    @Francisc: No. As I said to Blowsie earlier in the comments, it makes precisely no difference. – Tim Down Apr 25 '12 at 9:32

A JavaScript solution for IE is

onselectstart="return false;"
  • 47
    Don’t forget about ondragstart! – Mathias Bynens May 26 '10 at 13:25
  • 8
    one more thing here. If you add that to the body then you won't be able to select text inside textareas or input fields in IE. The way I fixed it for IE . body.onselectstart = function(e) { if (e.target.nodeName != "INPUT" && e.target.nodeName != "TEXTAREA") { e.preventDefault(); return false; } return true; } – TheBrain May 30 '13 at 16:56
  • 2
    This can be added as an attribute using jQuery - $("p").attr("onselectstart","return false") This was the only reliable method for me in IE8 – Matt Jun 5 '13 at 15:06
  • 5
    why I have use javascript when I have multi css solutions!.. – Abudayah Oct 31 '13 at 10:43
  • 11
    @Abudayah because they don't work in older versions of Internet Explorer? That's, like, the entire point of this answer. – Pekka 웃 Oct 31 '13 at 13:27

Until CSS 3's user-select property becomes available, Gecko-based browsers support the -moz-user-select property you already found. WebKit and Blink-based browsers support the -webkit-user-select property.

This of course is not supported in browsers that do not use the Gecko rendering engine.

There is no "standards" compliant quick-and-easy way to do it; using JavaScript is an option.

The real question is, why do you want users to not be able to highlight and presumably copy and paste certain elements? I have not come across a single time that I wanted to not let users highlight a certain portion of my website. Several of my friends, after spending many hours reading and writing code will use the highlight feature as a way to remember where on the page they were, or providing a marker so that their eyes know where to look next.

The only place I could see this being useful is if you have buttons for forms that should not be copy and pasted if a user copy and pasted the website.

  • 17
    The buttons thing would be exactly my motivation. – Kriem May 5 '09 at 20:47
  • 23
    Another reason this is needed is Shift-clicking to select multiple rows in a grid or table. You don't want to to highlight the text, you want it to select the rows. – Gordon Tucker Jan 6 '10 at 16:08
  • 7
    There are also legal issues where someone else's content is being legally republished but a clause in the license requires web publishers to prevent text from being easily copied and pasted. This is what led me to find this question. I don't agree with the requirement but the company I'm contracting for is legally obligated to implement it this way. – Craig M Mar 15 '11 at 20:34
  • 5
    @CraigM The css style doesn't stop a person from grabbing the HTML source and copying it. If you want to protect your content you'll have to find better ways. – Agile Jedi Dec 26 '13 at 23:25
  • 22
    Highly interactive web app with a lot of drag & drop... accidental highlighting is a big usability problem. – Marc Hughes Jun 3 '14 at 21:08

If you want to disable text selection on everything except on <p> elements, you can do this in CSS (watch out for the -moz-none which allows override in sub-elements, which is allowed in other browsers with none):

* {
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -khtml-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: -moz-none;
    -o-user-select: none;
    user-select: none;
}

p {
    -webkit-user-select: text;
    -khtml-user-select: text;
    -moz-user-select: text;
    -o-user-select: text;
    user-select: text;
}
  • 11
    Make sure you also make input fields selectable: p, input { -webkit-user-select: text; -khtml-user-select: text; -moz-user-select: text; -o-user-select: text; user-select: text; } – joshuadelange Jul 7 '11 at 22:39
  • 11
    Be very wary about turning off browser UI expectations on ALL code except for one item. What about list items <li /> text, for example? – Jason T Featheringham Nov 12 '11 at 7:13
  • Just an update... according to MDN since Firefox 21 -moz-none and none are the same. – Kevin Fegan Dec 25 '13 at 15:56
  • 2
    For this you may add cursor:default and cursor:text respectively : ) – T4NK3R Jul 14 '14 at 17:14

In the above solutions selection is stopped, but the user still thinks you can select text because the cursor still changes. To keep it static, you'll have to set your CSS cursor:

.noselect {
    cursor: default;
    -webkit-touch-callout: none;
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -khtml-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    -ms-user-select: none;
    user-select: none;
}
<p>
  Selectable text.
</p>
<p class="noselect">
  Unselectable text.
</p>

This will make your text totally flat, like it would be in a desktop application.

  • "Flat" as opposed to what? – kojow7 Feb 9 at 20:55
  • @kojow7 As opposed to "layered". Instead of text floating on top of the other elements. It is similar to the difference between SVG and PNG images. – Yeti Sep 19 at 9:35

You can do so in Firefox and Safari (Chrome also?)

::selection { background: transparent; }
::-moz-selection { background: transparent; }
  • 107
    I wouldn't recommend doing this, because it doesn't actually fix the issue; disabling text selection - it merely hides it. This can lead to bad usability, because if I drag my cursor around the page I could be selecting any arbitrary text without knowing it. This can cause all kinds of weird usability "bugs". – Keithamus Feb 2 '11 at 15:01
  • 1
    Doesn't work on PNG-images with transparent areas: The will always select in a light blue… Any workaround? – AvL Sep 18 '13 at 21:12

Workaround for WebKit:

/* Disable tap highlighting */
-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0,0,0,0);

I found it in a CardFlip example.

  • 1
    Using transparent in lieu of rgba also works in Chrome 42 on Android. – Clint Pachl Apr 29 '15 at 20:46

I like the hybrid CSS + jQuery solution.

To make all elements inside <div class="draggable"></div> unselectable, use this CSS:

.draggable {
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -khtml-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    -o-user-select: none;
    -ms-user-select: none;
    user-select: none;
}

.draggable input { 
    -webkit-user-select: text; 
    -khtml-user-select: text; 
    -moz-user-select: text; 
    -o-user-select: text; 
    user-select: text; 
 }

And then, if you're using jQuery, add this inside a $(document).ready() block:

if (($.browser.msie && $.browser.version < 10) || $.browser.opera) $('.draggable').find(':not(input)').attr('unselectable', 'on');

I figure you still want any input elements to be interactable, hence the :not() pseudo-selector. You could use '*' instead if you don't care.

Caveat: IE9 may not need this extra jQuery piece, so you may want to add a version check in there.

  • 5
    Use -ms-user-select: none; (for IE10) and your jQuery "if" should be this: if (($.browser.msie && $.browser.version < 10) || $.browser.opera) – mhenry1384 Jan 31 '13 at 3:42
  • Be careful man !!! To make it selectable in firefox you must use -moz-user-select: Normal; – Nicolas Thery Mar 10 '13 at 16:53
  • @nicholasthery w3.org/TR/2000/WD-css3-userint-20000216#user-select – Tom Auger Mar 11 '13 at 13:44
  • 7
    @mhenry1384 jQuery.browser has been deprecated as of version 1.3 and has been removed in version 1.9 - api.jquery.com/jQuery.browser – WynandB Mar 14 '13 at 23:58
  • @Wynand Good point. But what sort of "feature detection" exists to determine which CSS property to use? – Tom Auger Mar 15 '13 at 13:28

.hidden:after {
    content: attr(data-txt);
}
<p class="hidden" data-txt="Some text you don't want to be selected"></p>

It's not the best way, though.

  • 1
    You could also use title as the attribute. – Toothbrush May 7 '14 at 16:50
  • 5
    That is a very creative solution. Especially if it used the title attribute because that would probably be better for screen readers. – pseudosavant Sep 16 '14 at 21:49
  • 4
    I tried it (JSBin) and it doesn't work in IE. Unfortunately older IEs are the only ones that user-select doesn't work for. – pseudosavant Sep 16 '14 at 21:58
  • 1
    This is a great non-JS alternative that works in Chrome! Awesome! – saricden Nov 6 at 15:05

You can use CSS or JavaScript for that, JavaScript way is supported in Older browsers like Old IEs as well, but if it's not your case, use the CSS way then:

HTML/JavaScript:

<html onselectstart='return false;'>
  <body>
    <h1>This is the Heading!</h1>
    <p>And I'm the text, I won't be selected if you select me.</p>
  </body>
</html>

HTML/CSS:

.not-selectable {
  -webkit-touch-callout: none;
  -webkit-user-select: none;
  -khtml-user-select: none;
  -moz-user-select: none;
  -ms-user-select: none;
  user-select: none;
}
<body class="not-selectable">
  <h1>This is the Heading!</h1>
  <p>And I'm the text, I won't be selected if you select me.</p>
</body>

  • The javascript version is not fully working as intended. If you start selecting under the text and then move your cursor up the text will be selecting just fine. – Gh61 May 14 at 13:48
  • @Gh61 it was because was applied to body and the Run code snippet make a html tag around it, so if apply it to <html> it will do it, look at the update – Alireza May 14 at 13:54

For Internet Explorer in addition, you need to add pseudo class focus (.ClassName:focus) and outline-style:none.

.ClassName,
.ClassName:focus {
    -webkit-touch-callout: none;
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -khtml-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    -ms-user-select: none;
    user-select: none;
    outline-style:none;/*IE*/
}
  • 3
    This does work in IE so long as the selection starts on an element with the className class. See this JSBin. – pseudosavant Sep 16 '14 at 22:01

Working

CSS:

 -khtml-user-select: none;
 -moz-user-select: none;
 -ms-user-select: none;
  user-select: none;
 -webkit-touch-callout: none;
 -webkit-user-select: none;

This should be working, but it won't work for the old browsers. There is a browser compatibility issue.

  • The unprefixed CSS property must be strictly at the end of list of prefixed versions of the property. It is good right practice, other is bad practice making an "new IE" from Chrome/Webkit and leading to so much UGLY THINGS as introducing -webkit prefix support in not webkit browsers. Look, this was already in 2012: dev.opera.com/articles/… – FlameStorm Mar 21 '17 at 22:52
  • And I quote: This is because through our site compatibility work, we have experienced that many authors of (especially mobile) sites only use -webkit- prefixed CSS, thereby ignoring other vendor prefixes and not even including an unprefixed equivalent. This leads to a reduced user experience on Opera and Firefox, which don’t receive the same shiny effects such as transitions, gradients and the like, even if the browser supported those effects. – FlameStorm Mar 21 '17 at 22:52
-webkit-user-select: none;
-khtml-user-select: none;
-moz-user-select: none;
-o-user-select: none;
user-select: none;

*.unselectable {
   -moz-user-select: -moz-none;
   -khtml-user-select: none;
   -webkit-user-select: none;
   user-select: none;
}
<div id="foo" unselectable="on" class="unselectable">...</div>
function makeUnselectable(node) {
    if (node.nodeType == 1) {
        node.unselectable = true;
    }
    var child = node.firstChild;
    while (child) {
        makeUnselectable(child);
        child = child.nextSibling;
    }
}

makeUnselectable(document.getElementById("foo"));
-webkit-user-select:none;
-moz-user-select:none;
onselectstart="return false;"
::selection { background: transparent; }
::-moz-selection { background: transparent; }

* {
-webkit-user-select: none;
-khtml-user-select: none;
-moz-user-select: -moz-none;
-o-user-select: none;
user-select: none;
}

p {
-webkit-user-select: text;
-khtml-user-select: text;
-moz-user-select: text;
-o-user-select: text;
user-select: text;
}
<div class="draggable"></div>
.draggable {
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -khtml-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    -o-user-select: none;
    user-select: none;
}

.draggable input { 
    -webkit-user-select: text; 
    -khtml-user-select: text; 
    -moz-user-select: text; 
    -o-user-select: text; 
    user-select: text; 
 }
if ($.browser.msie) $('.draggable').find(':not(input)').attr('unselectable', 'on');

For those who have trouble achieving the same in the Android browser with the touch event, use:

html,body{
    -webkit-touch-callout: none;
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0,0,0,0);
    -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;
}
  • @Volker E. well, he DOES say that it's for the android browser only, you could just add that to the other answers instead of being sarcastic. – dudewad Jan 7 '16 at 21:33

If you are using Less and Bootstrap you could write:

.user-select(none);

Aside from the Mozilla-only property, no, there is no way to disable text selection with just standard CSS (as of now).

If you notice, Stack Overflow doesn't disable text selection for their navigation buttons, and I would recommend against doing so in most cases, since it modifies normal selection behavior and makes it conflict with a user's expectations.

  • While I agree that it changes behaviour the user expects, it would make sense for things like the "Add Comment" button that is sitting next to this form field ... – X-Istence May 5 '09 at 20:40
  • But doesn't that expose needless implementation details? An input or button's text can't be selected. – anon May 5 '09 at 20:40
  • @anon: Most users will probably not try to select the text of your button, so in practice, it shouldn't really matter much. Besides, in order to do so, they will have to start selecting outside of the button—if they click inside the button itself, the onclick handler will activate instead. Plus, certain browsers (e.g. Safari) actually let you select the text of normal buttons… – hbw May 5 '09 at 20:49
  • 5
    If you're selecting a set of comments from a chat thread and each comment has an upvote/downvote button next to it, then it would be nice to select the text without the other stuff. That's what the user expects or wants. He doesn't want to copy/paste the button labels with every comment. – Mnebuerquo Aug 3 '13 at 16:52
  • 2
    And what if you for example double click a button which instead of redirecting you to another page opens a div? then the text for the button will be selected due to the double-click! – Gigala Jul 25 '14 at 11:32

This works in some browsers:

::selection{ background-color: transparent;}
::moz-selection{ background-color: transparent;}
::webkit-selection{ background-color: transparent;}

Simply add your desired elements/ids in front of the selectors separated by commas without spaces, like so:

h1::selection,h2::selection,h3::selection,p::selection{ background-color: transparent;}
h1::moz-selection,h2::moz-selection,h3::moz-selection,p::moz-selection{ background-color: transparent;}
h1::webkit-selection,h2::webkit-selection,h3::webkit-selection,p::webkit-selection{ background-color: transparent;}

The other answers are better; this should probably be seen as a last resort/catchall.

  • 2
    There are few things that can be known for sure, but this solution definitely doesn't work in all browsers. – Volker E. Sep 30 '14 at 9:27
  • 1
    they why you say all browsers.. clearly you can edit better your answer – scx Nov 13 '14 at 14:03
  • @scx the goal of the answer was to provide a starting point. as you can see, there are much better answers than mine anyway. if i have time to take another crack at it in the future, i'll experiment and see what i can come up with. – r3wt Nov 14 '14 at 11:13

Suppose there are two div like this

.second {
  cursor: default;
  user-select: none;
  -webkit-user-select: none;
  /* Chrome/Safari/Opera */
  -moz-user-select: none;
  /* Firefox */
  -ms-user-select: none;
  /* IE/Edge */
  -webkit-touch-callout: none;
  /* iOS Safari */
}
<div class="first">
  This is my first div
</div>

<div class="second">
  This is my second div
</div>

Set cursor to default so that it will give a unselectable feel to user/

Prefix need to be use to support it in all browsers without prefix this may not work in all the answers.

NOTE:

The correct answer is correct in that it prevents you from being able to select the text. However, it does not prevent you from being able to copy the text, as I'll show with the next couple of screenshots (as of 7th Nov 2014).

Before we have selected anything

After we have selected

The numbers have been copied

As you can see, we were unable to select the numbers, but we were able to copy them.

Tested on: Ubuntu, Google Chrome 38.0.2125.111.

  • 1
    I've had the same problem. On Mac Chrome 48.0.2564.116 and on Mac Safari 9.0.3. Notably, Mac Firefox 43.0 doesn't copy the character, but sticks extra endlines between them. What should be done about this? – NHDaly Mar 5 '16 at 1:34

Add this to the first div in which you want to disable the selection for text:

onmousedown='return false;' 
onselectstart='return false;'

This will be useful if color selection is also not needed:

::-moz-selection { background:none; color:none; }
::selection { background:none; color:none; }

...all other browser fixes. It will work in Internet Explorer 9 or later.

To get the result I needed I found I had to use both ::selection and user-select

input.no-select:focus { 
    -webkit-touch-callout: none; 
    -webkit-user-select: none; 
    -khtml-user-select: none; 
    -moz-user-select: none; 
    -ms-user-select: none; 
    user-select: none; 
}

input.no-select::selection { 
    background: transparent; 
}

input.no-select::-moz-selection { 
    background: transparent; 
}

This is not CSS, but it is worth a mention:

jQuery UI Disable Selection:

$("your.selector").disableSelection();
  • 22
    Deprecated as of version 1.9... – adamb Jun 18 '13 at 21:18

Though this pseudo-element was in drafts of CSS Selectors Level 3, it was removed during the Candidate Recommendation phase, as it appeared that its behavior was under-specified, especially with nested elements, and interoperability wasn't achieved.

It's being discussed in How ::selection works on nested elements.

Despite it is being implemented in browser, you can make an illusion of text not being selected by using the same color and background color on selection as of the tab design (in your case).

Normal CSS Design

p { color: white;  background: black; }

On selection

p::-moz-selection { color: white;  background: black; }
p::selection      { color: white;  background: black; }

Disallowing users to select the text will raise usability issues.

  • This must be why Netbeans auto-completion has no idea what I am talking about! – halfer Apr 26 '14 at 20:16

Check my solution without JavaScript:

jsFiddle

li:hover {
    background-color: silver;
}
#id1:before {
    content: "File";
}
#id2:before {
    content: "Edit";
}
#id3:before {
    content: "View";
}
<ul>
    <li><a id="id1" href="www.w1.com"></a>
    <li><a id="id2" href="www.w2.com"></a>
    <li><a id="id3" href="www.w3.com"></a>
</ul>

Popup menu with my technique applied: http://jsfiddle.net/y4Lac/2/

I have learned from CSS-Tricks website.

user-select: none;

And this also:

::selection{ background-color: transparent;}
::moz-selection{ background-color: transparent;}
::webkit-selection{ background-color: transparent;}

Quick hack update: March 2017 -from CSS-Tricks

If you put the value 'none' for all the CSS user select attributes as showed in below, there is a problem which can be still occurred by this.

.div{
  -webkit-user-select: none; /* Chrome all / Safari all */
  -moz-user-select: none;   /* Firefox all */
  -ms-user-select: none;  /* IE 10+ */
   user-select: none;  /* Likely future */ 
}

As CSS-Trick says the problems is

  • WebKit still allows the text to be copied if you select elements around it.

So you can also use the below one instead to enforce that an entire element getting selected which is the solution for the problem. All you have to do is changing the value 'none' to 'all' which would look like this

.force-select {  
  -webkit-user-select: all;  /* Chrome 49+ */
  -moz-user-select: all;     /* Firefox 43+ */
  -ms-user-select: all;      /* No support yet */
  user-select: all;          /* Likely future */   
}
 -webkit-user-select: none;  
  -moz-user-select: none;    
  -ms-user-select: none;      
  user-select: none;

Try to use this one:

::selection {
    background: transparent;
}

And if you wish to specify not select inside a specific element, just put the element class or id before the selection rule, such as:

.ClassNAME::selection {
    background: transparent;
}
#IdNAME::selection {
    background: transparent;
}

protected by Community Apr 25 '12 at 20:42

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