I am trying to make what I thought would be a simple Panel in WPF, which has the following properties:

  • If the combined heights of the children are less than the available height, then all children are displayed at their desired height.

  • If the combined heights of the children are greater than the available height, all children are reduced by the same percentage height in order to fit.

My panel looks like this:

public class MyStackPanel : Panel
{
    protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size availableSize)
    {
        Size requiredSize = new Size();

        foreach (UIElement e in InternalChildren)
        {
            e.Measure(availableSize);
            requiredSize.Height += e.DesiredSize.Height;
            requiredSize.Width = Math.Max(requiredSize.Width, e.DesiredSize.Width);
        }

        return new Size(
            Math.Min(availableSize.Width, requiredSize.Width),
            Math.Min(availableSize.Height, requiredSize.Height));
    }

    protected override Size ArrangeOverride(Size finalSize)
    {
        double requiredHeight = 0;

        foreach (UIElement e in InternalChildren)
        {
            requiredHeight += e.DesiredSize.Height;
        }

        double scale = 1;

        if (requiredHeight > finalSize.Height)
        {
            scale = finalSize.Height / requiredHeight;
        }

        double y = 0;

        foreach (UIElement e in InternalChildren)
        {
            double height = e.DesiredSize.Height * scale;
            e.Arrange(new Rect(0, y, finalSize.Width, height));
            y += height;
        }

        return finalSize;
    }
}

My test XAML looks like this:

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication1.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication1"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="300" Width="300">
    <Window.Resources>
        <x:Array x:Key="Items" Type="{x:Type sys:String}">
            <sys:String>Item1</sys:String>
            <sys:String>Item2</sys:String>
            <sys:String>Item3</sys:String>
            <sys:String>Item4</sys:String>
        </x:Array>
    </Window.Resources>
    <local:MyStackPanel>
        <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
        <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
        <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
        <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
        <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
    </local:MyStackPanel>
</Window>

But the output looks like this:

Layout Problem

As you can see, the items are clipping - the list boxes should be displaying scroll bars. The child items are not respecting the size given to them in the arrange pass.

From my investigations it seems that you cannot give a smaller size to a control in the arrange pass than you gave in the measure pass.

However, I cannot do this because I need the results of measure pass to know what size to give to the children in the arrange pass.

It seems like a chicken and egg situation. Is layout in WPF broken? Surely the measure pass should be just that, a measure pass?

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem in your case is that you pass all the available space to each child to its Measure call (e.Measure(availableSize)). But you need to pass only the portion of the space that you actually going to give them. Like this:

protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size availableSize)
{
    Size requiredSize = new Size();

    var itemAvailableSize = new Size(availableSize.Width, availableSize.Height / InternalChildren.Count);

    foreach (UIElement e in InternalChildren)
    {
        e.Measure(itemAvailableSize);
        requiredSize.Height += e.DesiredSize.Height;
        requiredSize.Width = Math.Max(requiredSize.Width, e.DesiredSize.Width);
    }

    return new Size(
        Math.Min(availableSize.Width, requiredSize.Width),
        Math.Min(availableSize.Height, requiredSize.Height));
}

Update:

In case when the size that you are planning to give each individual item is not easily calculated based on availableSize and depends on other items desired size, you can do the first round of measuring on all items passing double.PositiveInfinity as Height. After that you will know how big each items wants to be and you can calculate how much space you are actually going to give to each item. Then you need to call Measure with the calculated space once again.

Here is an example:

protected override Size MeasureOverride(Size availableSize)
{
    var requiredSize = new Size();

    double allItemsHeight = 0;

    foreach (UIElement e in InternalChildren)
    {
        e.Measure(new Size(availableSize.Width, double.PositiveInfinity));
        allItemsHeight += e.DesiredSize.Height;
    }

    double scale = 1;

    if (allItemsHeight > availableSize.Height)
    {
        scale = availableSize.Height / allItemsHeight;
    }

    foreach (UIElement e in InternalChildren)
    {
        double height = e.DesiredSize.Height * scale;

        e.Measure(new Size(availableSize.Width, height));

        requiredSize.Height += e.DesiredSize.Height;
        requiredSize.Width = Math.Max(requiredSize.Width, e.DesiredSize.Width);
    }

    return new Size(
        Math.Min(availableSize.Width, requiredSize.Width),
        Math.Min(availableSize.Height, requiredSize.Height));
}
  • This assumes that each child needs the same amount of space, which may not be the case (though I could be wrong) – Steve Greatrex Nov 25 '11 at 14:13
  • Yes, although in my example each child is the same size, unfortunately in my real life application there will be differing sizes. – Grokys Nov 25 '11 at 14:16
  • @Groky - It doesn't matter. The point is that you should call Measure with the size that you are actually planning to give them. – Pavlo Glazkov Nov 25 '11 at 14:20
  • @PavloGlazkov - That's the whole point! I don't know at the time of Measure! The size will depend on the DesiredSize of the other children. – Grokys Nov 25 '11 at 14:25
  • @PavloGlazkov - and it seems wrong to me that the measure pass actually affects the arrangement. Surely measure should be just for measuring? – Grokys Nov 25 '11 at 14:28

This is a very interesting question, and I don't think I can answer "is layout broken" - I'm convinced it shouldn't be but looking at your example I can't work out how to "fix" it using the measure/layout passes.

I can, however, suggest the following as an alternative to get (roughly) the desired effect:

<ItemsControl>
    <ItemsControl.ItemsPanel>
        <ItemsPanelTemplate>
            <UniformGrid Rows="{Binding Items.Count,
                 RelativeSource={RelativeSource FindAncestor, AncestorType=ItemsControl}}" />
        </ItemsPanelTemplate>
    </ItemsControl.ItemsPanel>
    <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
    <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
    <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
    <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
    <ListBox ItemsSource="{StaticResource Items}"/>
</ItemsControl>

enter image description here

This will assign a uniform amount of space to each item in the list. It doesn't quite work if there are insufficient items to fill all available space, but it's almost there.

  • Thanks Steve. It seems the way to fix it is to call Measure twice in the measure pass. I've read elsewhere that one should not do this, but for this simple example it seems to work. As always my production layout is more complex, so we will see if it works for that. – Grokys Nov 25 '11 at 14:57
  • I don't love the idea of measuring twice, but if it works it works! – Steve Greatrex Nov 25 '11 at 14:59
  • Steve - yeah, like I say I've read not to do that. But it indeed seems to work fine in my production layout. Thanks for your help! – Grokys Nov 25 '11 at 15:50
  • 1
    According to MSDN it is absolutely fine for parent to call measure for a child several times to find optimal size. – Ashi Jul 9 '14 at 9:07

The problem is that you are telling your child controls that they can have the entire available size in the MeasureOverride

e.Measure(availableSize);

You need to restrict the size here to let them know that they will be resized. You should be able to implement a similar logic in your MeasureOverride.

  • At the point of Measure the OP states that he doesn't know whether the controls need to be resized – Steve Greatrex Nov 25 '11 at 14:05
  • Exactly, the available size for each child depends on the size of the other children so at the point of measure I can only give each child the availableSize. – Grokys Nov 25 '11 at 14:12

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