Is there a function in JavaScript similar to Python's range()?

I think there should be a better way than to write the following lines every time:

array = new Array();
for (i = 0; i < specified_len; i++) {
    array[i] = i;
}
  • 1
    @clwen: Unfortunately there is not, but take a look at my code - I have written a function that is aimed at emulating the way range() works in Python, so you can use it. There is no such function in JavaScript, but there are some plugins for different frameworks, such as Range class for MooTools. – Tadeck Nov 25 '11 at 19:06

15 Answers 15

up vote 62 down vote accepted

No, there is none, but you can make one.

JavaScript's implementation of Python's range()

Trying to emulate how it works in Python, I would create function similar to this:

function range(start, stop, step) {
    if (typeof stop == 'undefined') {
        // one param defined
        stop = start;
        start = 0;
    }

    if (typeof step == 'undefined') {
        step = 1;
    }

    if ((step > 0 && start >= stop) || (step < 0 && start <= stop)) {
        return [];
    }

    var result = [];
    for (var i = start; step > 0 ? i < stop : i > stop; i += step) {
        result.push(i);
    }

    return result;
};

See this jsfiddle for a proof.

Comparison between range() in JavaScript and Python

It works in the following way:

  • range(4) returns [0, 1, 2, 3],
  • range(3,6) returns [3, 4, 5],
  • range(0,10,2) returns [0, 2, 4, 6, 8],
  • range(10,0,-1) returns [10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1],
  • range(8,2,-2) returns [8, 6, 4],
  • range(8,2) returns [],
  • range(8,2,2) returns [],
  • range(1,5,-1) returns [],
  • range(1,5,-2) returns [],

and its Python counterpart works exactly the same way (at least in the mentioned cases):

>>> range(4)
[0, 1, 2, 3]
>>> range(3,6)
[3, 4, 5]
>>> range(0,10,2)
[0, 2, 4, 6, 8]
>>> range(10,0,-1)
[10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
>>> range(8,2,-2)
[8, 6, 4]
>>> range(8,2)
[]
>>> range(8,2,2)
[]
>>> range(1,5,-1)
[]
>>> range(1,5,-2)
[]

So if you need a function to work similarly to Python's range(), you can use above mentioned solution.

  • 3
    maybe a couple of additional defensive checks - ensure that the arguments passed are all coercible to numbers and ensure that stop is greater than start (and swap them if not). – Russ Cam Nov 25 '11 at 18:46
  • 1
    @RussCam: Thanks for pointing this out. I did not add defensive checks for types etc., but I implemented reverse order of elements - it now works exactly the same as Python counterpart, when the last param is negative integer. – Tadeck Nov 25 '11 at 18:59
  • @RussCam: start >= stop leading to an empty array is necessary if the goal is really emulating Python's range. And I'd argue it's more intuitive anyway. – user395760 Nov 25 '11 at 19:11
  • 1
    @delnan: Check may be more complex, as simple start >= stop is not enough for this function to behave like range() in Python. I have updated my answer. – Tadeck Nov 25 '11 at 19:19
  • @delnan - I'm not familiar with the Python implementation. I guess if it's only going to be used by peeps familiar with the Python implementation that it makes sense to emulate it :) – Russ Cam Nov 25 '11 at 19:27

For a very simple range in ES6:

let range = n => Array.from(Array(n).keys())
  • 14
    A simpler version of this is let range = n => [...Array(n).keys()] – Bharath Raja Sep 13 '17 at 12:13
  • @BharathRaja great, thanks! Why not const? I'll try to use const wherever I can :) like the Java final counterpart ;) – Kjellski Mar 13 at 11:17
  • You're right, I try to use const as much as possible, but here it'll just be a reference to the array, so the array would still be editable :'D – Bharath Raja Mar 21 at 8:44

2018: this answer keeps getting upvotes, so here's an update. The code below is obsolete, but luckily ES6 standardized generators and the yield keyword, and they are universally supported across platforms. An example of the lazy range() using yield can be found here.


In addition to what's already said, Javascript 1.7+ provides support for iterators and generators which can be used to create a lazy, memory-efficient version of range, simlar to xrange in Python2:

function range(low, high) {  
    return {
        __iterator__: function() {
            return {  
                next: function() {
                    if (low > high)
                        throw StopIteration;  
                    return low++;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

for (var i in range(3, 5))  
  console.log(i); // 3,4,5
  • 1
    +1 Great idea! Could you implement also step argument and test it on the values from my answer? Your answer is great for the applications where we have very specific browsers in mind (it won't work in Google Chrome, Safari and IE version earlier than 9: stackoverflow.com/a/2209743/548696). – Tadeck Sep 9 '12 at 3:18
  • @Tadeck: ironically, I asked a very similar question recently, check it out - some good answers there. BTW, your code does not pass my test ;( – georg Sep 9 '12 at 11:14
  • Could you share the test data and expected results? I would be happy to improve it, but my tests are 100% passing. Are you saying the code I have given is not properly parsed by script you have placed in this question: stackoverflow.com/q/12173856/548696 ? – Tadeck Sep 9 '12 at 17:21
  • @Tadeck: nevermind. I tested slices and your code is for ranges. – georg Sep 9 '12 at 19:59

A port of Python's range function is provided by the underscore.js and lodash utility libraries (along with many other useful tools). Examples copied from the underscore docs:

_.range(10);
=> [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
_.range(1, 11);
=> [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
_.range(0, 30, 5);
=> [0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25]
_.range(0, -10, -1);
=> [0, -1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -9]
_.range(0);
=> []

Fusing together both answers from @Tadeck and @georg, I came up with this:

function* range(start, stop, step = 1) {
    if (typeof stop === 'undefined') {
        // one param defined
        stop = start;
        start = 0;
    }

    for (let i = start; step > 0 ? i < stop : i > stop; i += step) {
        yield i;
    }
}

To use it in a for loop you need the ES6/JS1.7 for-of loop:

for (let i of range(0, 10, 2)) {
    console.log(i);
}
// Outputs => 0 2 4 6 8
  • Why not using default parameters if you are using ES6? – Amin NAIRI Apr 30 '17 at 10:20
  • @Gradiuss that would work for the step parameter, but when stop is not passed in, both start and stop need to be changed. I'll update it – janka102 May 1 '17 at 16:33
  • 1
    WTG, this is the best implementation presented so far. It uses generators (good, since there's no need to store the whole sequence in memory) and is very succint. – Lucio Paiva May 28 '17 at 2:26
  • undefined is a pointer to an object like null. possible to compare with 3 equal signs like: if (stop === undefined) { 3 equals signs is compare without auto casting. compare as is also compare type. 2 equal signs is compare with auto casting to other side type. – Shimon Doodkin Mar 27 at 12:48

Can be achieved by attaching an iterator to the Number prototype

  Number.prototype[Symbol.iterator] = function* () { 
     for (var i = 0; i <= this; i++) {
       yield i
     } 
  }

[...5] // will result in [0,1,2,3,4,5]

Taken from Kyle Simpson's course Rethinking Asynchronous JavaScript

  • 2
    This is really cool, but overriding prototypes just is too fragile :'( – m0meni Oct 20 '17 at 3:13

Here you go.

This will write (or overwrite) the value of each index with the index number.

Array.prototype.writeIndices = function( n ) {
    for( var i = 0; i < (n || this.length); ++i ) this[i] = i;
    return this;
};

If you don't provide a number, it will use the current length of the Array.

Use it like this:

var array = [].writeIndices(10);  // [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

For getting an array of size x, here's an one-liner without using any library

var range = n => Array(n + 1).join(1).split('').map((x, i) => i)

works as

> range(4)
[0, 1, 2, 3]

The following is a natural adaption of Python's range() function to JavaScript:

// Generate range from start (inclusive) to stop (exclusive):
function* range(start, stop, step = 1) {
   if (stop === undefined) [start, stop] = [0, start];
   if (step > 0) while (start < stop) yield start, start += step;
   else if (step < 0) while (start > stop) yield start, start += step;
   else throw new RangeError('range() step argument invalid');
} 

// Examples:
console.log([...range(3)]);       // [0, 1, 2]
console.log([...range(0, 3)]);    // [0, 1, 2]
console.log([...range(0, 3, -1)]);// []
console.log([...range(0, 0)]);    // []
console.log([...range(-3)]);      // []
console.log([...range(-3, 0)]);   // [-3, -2, -1]

It supports any argument which can be compared to 0 and stop and can be incremented by step. It behaves identical to the Python version when used with numbers not exceeding Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER.

Please note the following corner cases:

[...range(0, 0, 0)];        // RangeError: range() step argument invalid
[...range(Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER + 1, Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER + 2)];  // []
[...range(Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER + 2, Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER + 3)];  // Infinite loop
[...range(0.7, 0.8, 0.1)];  // [0.7, 0.7999999999999999]
[...range('1', '11')];      // ['1']
[...range('2', '22')];      // Infinite loop

In contrast to @Tadeck's, @Volv's and @janka102's answer which return [], undefined or enter an infinite loop when step evaluates to 0 or NaN, this generator function throws an exception similar to Python's behavior.

  • Agreed. Although the other answers are elegant in their own way, this approach and functionality is much more pythonic. – Travis Clarke Mar 18 at 7:33

You may use underscore library. It contains dozens of useful functions for working with arrays and many more.

Further refined with ES6 default parameters.

let range = function*(start = 0, stop, step = 1) {
  let cur = (stop === undefined) ? 0 : start;
  let max = (stop === undefined) ? start : stop;
  for (let i = cur; step < 0 ? i > max : i < max; i += step)
    yield i
}

Here's a small extension for one of the answers in case you need to specify both starting and ending position of the range:

let range = (start, end) => Array.from(Array(end + 1).keys()).slice(start);

Still no built-in function that is equivalent to range(), but with the most recent version - ES2015 - you can build your own implementation. Here's a limited version of it. Limited because it doesn't take into account the step parameter. Just min, max.

const range = (min = null, max = null) => Array.from({length:max ? max - min : min}, (v,k) => max ? k + min : k)

This is accomplished by the Array.from method able to build an array from any object that has a length property. So passing in a simple object with just the length property will create an ArrayIterator that will yield length number of objects.

Here is another es6 implementation of the range

// range :: (from, to, step?) -> [Number]
const range = (from, to, step = 1) => {
  //swap values if necesery
  [from, to] = from > to ? [to, from] : [from, to]
  //create range array
  return [...Array(Math.round((to - from) / step))]
    .map((_, index) => {
      const negative = from < 0 ? Math.abs(from) : 0
      return index < negative ? 
        from + index * step  :
        (index - negative + 1) * step
    })
}  

range(-20, 0, 5)
  .forEach(val => console.log(val))

for(const val of range(5, 1)){
   console.log(`value ${val}`)
}

pythonic mimics the Python range behaviour best it can using JS' generators (yield), supporting both the range(stop) and range(start, stop, step) use cases. In addition, pythonic's range function returns a custom built Generator object that supports map and filter, so one could do fancy one-liners like:

import {range} from 'pythonic';
// ...
const results = range(5).map(wouldBeInvokedFiveTimes);
// `results` is now an array containing elements from
// 5 calls to wouldBeInvokedFiveTimes

Install using npm:

npm install --save pythonic

Here's the code in pythonic for range:

function range(...args) {
    if (args.length < 2) {
        return new Generator(rangeGeneratorWithStop(...args));
    }
    return new Generator(rangeGeneratorWithSartAndStopAndStep(...args));
}

const rangeGeneratorWithStop = stop => function * () {
    for (let i = 0; i < stop; i++) {
        yield i;
    }
};

const rangeGeneratorWithSartAndStopAndStep = (start, stop, step = 1) => function * () {
    for (let i = start; i < stop; i += step) {
        yield i;
    }
};

function range(...args) {
    if (args.length < 2) {
        return new Generator(rangeGeneratorWithStop(...args));
    }
    return new Generator(rangeGeneratorWithSartAndStopAndStep(...args));
}

class Generator {
    constructor(generatorFn) {
        this[Symbol.iterator] = generatorFn;
    }

    map(callbackFn) {
        const result = [];
        for (const element of this) {
            result.push(callbackFn(element));
        }
        return result;
    }

    filter(callbackFn) {
        const result = [];
        for (const element of this) {
            if (callbackFn(element)) {
                result.push(element);
            }
        }
        return result;
    }

    toArray() {
        return Array.from(this);
    }
}

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