8

I'm pretty new to Mathematica and am stumped by this problem. I have a list that looks like this:

{{1, 1, 1}, {0}, {1}}

I want to replace each sublist with its first element. So, the above list should be converted to:

{1,0,1}

I've looked through the documentation repeatedly and Googled for hours. I'm sure that this is fairly simple, but I can't figure it out. I started with this list:

{1, 1, 1, 0, 1}

I need to know how many runs of 1's there are, which is obviously 2. So, I used Split to separate the list into groups of consecutive 1's and 0's. By using Length on this list I can get the total number of runs, which is 3. Now, I just need to calculate the number of runs of 1's. If I can convert the list as mentioned above, I can just sum the items in the list to get the answer.

I hope that makes sense. Thanks for any help!

6

I'd do this:

Count[Split[{1, 1, 1, 0, 1}][[All, 1]], 1]

or

Total[First /@ Split[{1, 1, 1, 0, 1}]]
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  • Perfect, thank you very much! I had tried [All, 1] to access the sublists, but I couldn't figure out the pattern to count. So, the pattern is simply the 1, right? – Tim Mayes Nov 26 '11 at 0:44
  • 1
    Yes, in this case the pattern is the literal 1. – Brett Champion Nov 26 '11 at 0:58
12

The proposed solutions are pretty fast, however if you want extreme efficiency (huge lists), here is another one which would be order of magnitude faster (formulated as a pure function):

Total[Clip[Differences@#,{0, 1}]] + First[#] &

For example:

In[86]:= 
largeTestList = RandomInteger[{0,1},{10^6}];
Count[Split[largeTestList],{1..}]//Timing
Count[Split[largeTestList][[All,1]],1]//Timing
Total[Clip[Differences@#,{0, 1}]] + First[#] &@largeTestList//Timing

Out[87]= {0.328,249887}
Out[88]= {0.203,249887}
Out[89]= {0.015,249887}

EDIT

I did not indend to initiate the "big shootout", but while we are at it, let me pull the biggest gun - compilation to C:

runsOf1C = 
 Compile[{{lst, _Integer, 1}},
   Module[{r = Table[0, {Length[lst] - 1}], i = 1, ctr = First[lst]},
    For[i = 2, i <= Length[lst], i++,
      If[lst[[i]] == 1 && lst[[i - 1]] == 0, ctr++]];
      ctr],
  CompilationTarget -> "C", RuntimeOptions -> "Speed"]

Now,

In[157]:= 
hugeTestList=RandomInteger[{0,1},{10^7}];
Total[Clip[ListCorrelate[{-1,1},#],{0,1}]]+First[#]&@hugeTestList//AbsoluteTiming
runsOf1C[hugeTestList]//AbsoluteTiming

Out[158]= {0.1872000,2499650}
Out[159]= {0.0780000,2499650}

Of course, this is not an elegant solution, but it is straightforward.

EDIT 2

Improving on the optimization of @Sjoerd, this one will be about 1.5 faster than runsOf1C still:

runsOf1CAlt = 
Compile[{{lst, _Integer, 1}},
  Module[{r = Table[0, {Length[lst] - 1}], i = 1, ctr = First[lst]},
    For[i = 2, i <= Length[lst], i++,
     If[lst[[i]] == 1,
      If[lst[[i - 1]] == 0, ctr++];
      i++
     ]];
    ctr],
  CompilationTarget -> "C", RuntimeOptions -> "Speed"]
|improve this answer|||||
  • 2
    Oooh, clever... You can get a bit more speed by using Tr instead of Total. (20% on my Mac.) – Brett Champion Nov 26 '11 at 4:39
  • That is impressive. So much so that I'll have to study it to figure out how it works. Fortunately, my lists won't likely exceed several thousand items. – Tim Mayes Nov 26 '11 at 7:00
  • @Brett Thanks for the hint! I keep forgetting about Tr, should move it to my "active" dictionary for Mathematica. – Leonid Shifrin Nov 26 '11 at 13:48
  • @TimMayes, don't feel bad, it took me some time to figure it out, also. I'd suggest looking at what Differences returns, first, then determining why Clip is needed. – rcollyer Nov 26 '11 at 14:16
  • Leonid I still think C is cheating. If we wanted to write procedural code, why would we be using Mathematica? (yes, this is officially sour grapes.) – Mr.Wizard Nov 26 '11 at 15:40
8

You have actually two questions, the one from the title and the question lurking behind it. The first one is answered by:

First/@ list

The second one, counting the number of runs of 1's, has been answered many times, but this solution

Total[Clip[ListCorrelate[{-1, 1}, #], {0, 1}]] + First[#] &

is about 50% faster than Leonid's solution. Note I increased the length of the test list for better timing:

largeTestList = RandomInteger[{0, 1}, {10000000}];
Count[Split[largeTestList], {1 ..}] // AbsoluteTiming
Count[Split[largeTestList][[All, 1]], 1] // AbsoluteTiming
Total[Clip[Differences@#, {0, 1}]] + First[#] &@ largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming
(Tr@Unitize@Differences@# + Tr@#[[{1, -1}]])/2 &@ largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming
Total[Clip[ListCorrelate[{-1, 1}, #], {0, 1}]] + First[#] &@
  largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming


Out[680]= {3.4361965, 2498095}

Out[681]= {2.4531403, 2498095}

Out[682]= {0.2710155, 2498095}

Out[683]= {0.2530145, 2498095}

Out[684]= {0.1710097, 2498095}

After Leonid's compilation attack I was about to throw in the towel, but I spotted a possible optimization, so onwards goes the battle... [Mr.Wizard, Leonid and I should be thrown in jail for disturbing the peace on SO]

runsOf1Cbis = 
 Compile[{{lst, _Integer, 1}}, 
  Module[{r = Table[0, {Length[lst] - 1}], i = 1, ctr = First[lst]}, 
   For[i = 2, i <= Length[lst], i++, 
    If[lst[[i]] == 1 && lst[[i - 1]] == 0, ctr++; i++]];
   ctr], CompilationTarget -> "C", RuntimeOptions -> "Speed"]

largeTestList = RandomInteger[{0, 1}, {10000000}]; 
Total[Clip[ListCorrelate[{-1, 1}, #], {0, 1}]] + First[#] &@
    largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming
runsOf1C[largeTestList] // AbsoluteTiming
runsOf1Cbis[largeTestList] // AbsoluteTiming


Out[869]= {0.1770101, 2500910}

Out[870]= {0.0960055, 2500910}

Out[871]= {0.0810046, 2500910}

The results vary, but I get an improvement between 10 and 30%.

The optimization may be hard to spot, but it's the extra i++ if the {0,1} test succeeds. You can't have two of these in successive locations.


And, here, an optimization of Leonid's optimization of my optimization of his optimization (I hope this isn't going to drag on, or I'm going to suffer a stack overflow):

runsOf1CDitto = 
 Compile[{{lst, _Integer, 1}}, 
  Module[{i = 1, ctr = First[lst]}, 
   For[i = 2, i <= Length[lst], i++, 
    If[lst[[i]] == 1, If[lst[[i - 1]] == 0, ctr++];
     i++]];
   ctr], CompilationTarget -> "C", RuntimeOptions -> "Speed"]

largeTestList = RandomInteger[{0, 1}, {10000000}]; 
Total[Clip[ListCorrelate[{-1, 1}, #], {0, 1}]] + First[#] &@
  largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming
runsOf1C[largeTestList] // AbsoluteTiming
runsOf1Cbis[largeTestList] // AbsoluteTiming
runsOf1CAlt[largeTestList] // AbsoluteTiming
runsOf1CDitto[largeTestList] // AbsoluteTiming


Out[907]= {0.1760101, 2501382}

Out[908]= {0.0990056, 2501382}

Out[909]= {0.0780045, 2501382}

Out[910]= {0.0670038, 2501382}

Out[911]= {0.0600034, 2501382}

Lucky for me, Leonid had a superfluous initialization in his code that could be removed.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    +1. I had no idea that something can be faster than Differences, the latter being essentially Rest[#]-Most[#]&. Learned something new today :) – Leonid Shifrin Nov 26 '11 at 13:52
  • Ditto what Leonid said. I would have to get really clever to beat that. :-) (BTW, I am surprised there is not more difference between the two Differences methods; there is on my system.) – Mr.Wizard Nov 26 '11 at 14:34
  • 1
    Actually, your method is much slower on v7. I am going to add timings to my own post for reference. – Mr.Wizard Nov 26 '11 at 14:37
  • @Mr.wizard Interesting. My timings are consistently giving me this 50% gain. Another reason to upgrade I'd say (v9 isn't anywhere near in sight). – Sjoerd C. de Vries Nov 26 '11 at 14:46
  • On the other hand, it's slower in places too: stackoverflow.com/q/8243627/618728 – Mr.Wizard Nov 26 '11 at 14:55
7

Here is a variation of Leonid's Differences method that is slightly faster:

(Tr@Unitize@Differences@# + Tr@#[[{1,-1}]])/2 &

Compared (using Tr for both):

list = RandomInteger[1, 1*^7];

Tr[Clip[Differences@#, {0,1}]] + First[#] & @ list //timeAvg

(Tr@Unitize@Differences@# + Tr@#[[{1,-1}]])/2 & @ list //timeAvg
0.1186
0.0904

Since this has become a code efficiency competition, here is my next effort:

(Tr@BitXor[Most@#, Rest@#] + Tr@#[[{1, -1}]])/2 &

Also, I am getting very different results using Mathematica 7, so I am including them here for reference:

largeTestList = RandomInteger[{0, 1}, {10000000}];
Count[Split[largeTestList], {1 ..}] // AbsoluteTiming
Count[Split[largeTestList][[All, 1]], 1] // AbsoluteTiming
Total[Clip[Differences@#, {0, 1}]] + First[#] &@largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming
(Tr@Unitize@Differences@# + Tr@#[[{1, -1}]])/2 &@largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming
Total[Clip[ListCorrelate[{-1, 1}, #], {0, 1}]] + First[#] &@largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming
(Tr@BitXor[Most@#, Rest@#] + Tr@#[[{1, -1}]])/2 &@largeTestList // AbsoluteTiming

{1.3400766, 2499840}

{0.9670553, 2499840}

{0.1460084, 2499840}

{0.1070061, 2499840}

{0.3710213, 2499840}

{0.0480028, 2499840}
|improve this answer|||||
  • +1 I actually thought that something like this should be possible, but wasn't persistent enough :). – Leonid Shifrin Nov 26 '11 at 13:54
  • I suppose ListCorrelate must have been improved in mma 8. – Sjoerd C. de Vries Nov 26 '11 at 14:50
  • @Sjoerd, how does my BitXor method compare on your machine? – Mr.Wizard Nov 26 '11 at 14:52
  • It's 0.1340076 vs 0.1720098 in favor of BitXor – Sjoerd C. de Vries Nov 26 '11 at 15:18
  • BTW Why do you use Tr instead of Total? On my PC the latter is like 1% faster – Sjoerd C. de Vries Nov 26 '11 at 15:24
6

Another approach, using Count to look for lists containing some number of repetitions of 1:

In[20]:= Count[Split[{1, 1, 1, 0, 1}], {1 ..}]

Out[20]= 2
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  • Thanks Brett. I swear that I tried something very close to that, but I kept getting errors on the pattern. I obviously had something wrong because your solution works. – Tim Mayes Nov 26 '11 at 6:56

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