19

I run a number of websites behind an nginx frontend. All my sites are in Python/Django. I see in my logs lots of crawling by hackers for various php applications - I'd like to block them (return a 404) at nginx without them hitting my application servers.

I'd like to do this globally in my nginx conf file so it applies to all my site-specific configurations.

So, how do I:

  1. Return 404 for all extensions of type .php
  2. Return 404 for partial matches of certain strings, such as "phpmyadmin"
24

Try:

location ~ (\.php$|myadmin) {
    return 403;
}
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  • gr8 thanks. I accepted this answer because it solves my actual problem, but the addition by alexander below is critical to the way I did want to implement the solution. – user658587 Nov 28 '11 at 7:06
6

location must appear inside server only, it's not allowed inside http.

So, the only option is to create a file with your common locations and include it into your servers.

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  • you make a good point. Do you know of any way to do this globally? I.e. for all server blocks - without having to be explicit at the server level – Mark Apr 9 at 19:38
4

Complementing Dayo answer, we must also add a trailing dollar, otherwise any file like jquery.mousescroller.js will also be blocked.

location ~ (\.php$|myadmin) {
    return 403;
}
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0

You an also try if and regex. E.g. for servering static files with exclusion rules, I did it as below, to serve debug js files from a different folder tree. :

location /some/virtual/path/ {
    if( $request_uri !~ '\.js$' ) { return 404 ; }
    alias /some/real/path/
}
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