76

Is there a way to have an JUnit Rule or something similar that gives every failing test a second chance, just by trying to run it once again.

Background: I have a large Set of Selenium2-WebDriver tests written with JUnit. Due to a very aggressive timing (only short wait periods after the clicks) some tests (1 out of 100, and always a different one) can fail because the server sometimes responds a bit slower. But I can not make the wait period so long that it is definitely long enough, because then the tests will take for ever.) -- So I think it is acceptable for this use case that a test is green even if it needs a second try.

Of course it would be better to have a 2 out of 3 majority (repeat a failing test 3 times, and take them as correct, if two of the tests are correct), but this would be a future improvement.

  • 1
    It should not be necessary to have fix wait times in selenium 2. The WebDriver should detect page loading and wait accordingly. If you want to wait for something else but page loading, for example some JavaScript to execute, you should use the WebDriverWait class, see: seleniumhq.org/docs/04_webdriver_advanced.html. That said, I think it may be okay to retry GUI tests, I just wanted to clarify that no explicit wait time is needed in most cases. – Tim Büthe May 9 '12 at 12:21
  • It's true, but I'll point out also that I've worked on some really, really poor servers that are "fine", but they have a REALLY long spin up time on certain page instances, and therefore, I don't want to fail. This is a great question, thanks. (naturally, I'd prefer that the timing ALWAYS be consistent, and we're going to push for that, but until then, this will have to do) – cgp Aug 22 '12 at 13:44
  • If You are using cucumber rerun.txt feature please find my answer here – Sugat Mankar Nov 4 '15 at 10:50
  • If you are using Cucumber rerun.txt feature please see ans here. – Sugat Mankar Nov 4 '15 at 10:52
100

You can do this with a TestRule. This will give you the flexibility you need. A TestRule allows you to insert logic around the test, so you would implement the retry loop:

public class RetryTest {
    public class Retry implements TestRule {
        private int retryCount;

        public Retry(int retryCount) {
            this.retryCount = retryCount;
        }

        public Statement apply(Statement base, Description description) {
            return statement(base, description);
        }

        private Statement statement(final Statement base, final Description description) {
            return new Statement() {
                @Override
                public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
                    Throwable caughtThrowable = null;

                    // implement retry logic here
                    for (int i = 0; i < retryCount; i++) {
                        try {
                            base.evaluate();
                            return;
                        } catch (Throwable t) {
                            caughtThrowable = t;
                            System.err.println(description.getDisplayName() + ": run " + (i+1) + " failed");
                        }
                    }
                    System.err.println(description.getDisplayName() + ": giving up after " + retryCount + " failures");
                    throw caughtThrowable;
                }
            };
        }
    }

    @Rule
    public Retry retry = new Retry(3);

    @Test
    public void test1() {
    }

    @Test
    public void test2() {
        Object o = null;
        o.equals("foo");
    }
}

The heart of a TestRule is the base.evaluate(), which calls your test method. So around this call you put a retry loop. If an exception is thrown in your test method (an assertion failure is actually an AssertionError), then the test has failed, and you'll retry.

There is one other thing that may be of use. You may only want to apply this retry logic to a set of tests, in which case you can add into the Retry class above a test for a particular annotation on the method. Description contains a list of annotations for the method. For more information about this, see my answer to How to run some code before each JUnit @Test method individually, without using @RunWith nor AOP?.

Using a custom TestRunner

This is the suggestion of CKuck, you can define your own Runner. You need to extend BlockJUnit4ClassRunner and override runChild(). For more information see my answer to How to define JUnit method rule in a suite?. This answer details how to define how to run code for every method in a Suite, for which you have to define your own Runner.

  • Thanks: BTW for every one how will try this, TestRule is a feature that exists since JUnit version 4.9 – Ralph Nov 28 '11 at 20:36
  • @Ralph Actually, TestRule is a replacement for MethodRule, which was introduced earlier, about 4.7 IIRC, so this solution can potentially apply before 4.9, but would be slightly different. – Matthew Farwell Nov 29 '11 at 8:57
  • 7
    This was really helpful, but something that jumped my mind: retryCount and retries might be misleading names. When retry is 1, I would assume, that he runs the test, and if it fails, retries it once, but thats not the case. The variable should probably be called maxTries. – Thomas M. Jun 19 '13 at 9:56
  • @MatthewFarwell: does this restart the activity? Is there any way, we can do that? – Basim Sherif Jul 20 '16 at 9:33
  • 2
    Using this method does have a constraint that the test reruns are done without recreating the test instance. That means any instance fields in the test class (or super classes) will not be reinitialized, possibly leaving state from the earlier runs around. – Jonah Graham Dec 4 '16 at 6:09
18

As for me writing custom runner more flexible solution. The solution that posted above (with code example) has two disadvantages:

  1. It won't retry test if it fails on the @BeforeClass stage;
  2. It calculating tests run a bit differently (when you have 3 retries, you will receive test Runs: 4, success 1 that might be confusing);

That's why I prefer more approach with writing custom runner. And code of custom runner could be following:

import org.junit.Ignore;
import org.junit.internal.AssumptionViolatedException;
import org.junit.internal.runners.model.EachTestNotifier;
import org.junit.runner.Description;
import org.junit.runner.notification.RunNotifier;
import org.junit.runner.notification.StoppedByUserException;
import org.junit.runners.BlockJUnit4ClassRunner;
import org.junit.runners.model.FrameworkMethod;
import org.junit.runners.model.InitializationError;
import org.junit.runners.model.Statement;


public class RetryRunner extends BlockJUnit4ClassRunner {

    private final int retryCount = 100;
    private int failedAttempts = 0;

    public RetryRunner(Class<?> klass) throws InitializationError {
        super(klass);
    }    


    @Override
    public void run(final RunNotifier notifier) {
        EachTestNotifier testNotifier = new EachTestNotifier(notifier,
                getDescription());
        Statement statement = classBlock(notifier);
        try {

            statement.evaluate();
        } catch (AssumptionViolatedException e) {
            testNotifier.fireTestIgnored();
        } catch (StoppedByUserException e) {
            throw e;
        } catch (Throwable e) {
            retry(testNotifier, statement, e);
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected void runChild(final FrameworkMethod method, RunNotifier notifier) {
        Description description = describeChild(method);
        if (method.getAnnotation(Ignore.class) != null) {
            notifier.fireTestIgnored(description);
        } else {
            runTestUnit(methodBlock(method), description, notifier);
        }
    }

    /**
     * Runs a {@link Statement} that represents a leaf (aka atomic) test.
     */
    protected final void runTestUnit(Statement statement, Description description,
            RunNotifier notifier) {
        EachTestNotifier eachNotifier = new EachTestNotifier(notifier, description);
        eachNotifier.fireTestStarted();
        try {
            statement.evaluate();
        } catch (AssumptionViolatedException e) {
            eachNotifier.addFailedAssumption(e);
        } catch (Throwable e) {
            retry(eachNotifier, statement, e);
        } finally {
            eachNotifier.fireTestFinished();
        }
    }

    public void retry(EachTestNotifier notifier, Statement statement, Throwable currentThrowable) {
        Throwable caughtThrowable = currentThrowable;
        while (retryCount > failedAttempts) {
            try {
                statement.evaluate();
                return;
            } catch (Throwable t) {
                failedAttempts++;
                caughtThrowable = t;
            }
        }
        notifier.addFailure(caughtThrowable);
    }
}
  • 2
    Problem is when test fails in AfterClass method. – user1050755 Nov 26 '14 at 20:57
  • 1
    I don't see any problem. I wrote sample test that run test with specified runner and it seems work ok: @RunWith(RetryRunner.class) public class TestSample { private static int i = 0; @AfterClass public static void testBefore() { System.out.println("Before test"); i++; if(i < 2){ fail("Fail"); } } } – user1459144 Dec 3 '14 at 10:39
17

Now there is a better option. If you're using maven plugins like: surfire or failsefe there is an option to add parameter rerunFailingTestsCount SurFire Api. This stuff was implemented in the following ticket: Jira Ticket. In this case you don't need to write your custom code and plugin automatically amend test results report.
I see only one drawback of this approach: If some test is failed on Before/After class stage test won't be re-ran.

6

You have to write your own org.junit.runner.Runner and annotate your tests with @RunWith(YourRunner.class).

3

Proposed comment was written based ob this article with some additions.

Here, if some Test Case from your jUnit project gets "failure" or "error" result, this Test Case will be re-run one more time. Totally here we set 3 chance to get success result.

So, We need to create Rule Class and add "@Rule" notifications to your Test Class.

If you do not want to wright the same "@Rule" notifications for each your Test Class, you can add it to your abstract SetProperty Class(if you have it) and extends from it.

Rule Class:

import org.junit.rules.TestRule;
import org.junit.runner.Description;
import org.junit.runners.model.Statement;

public class RetryRule implements TestRule {
    private int retryCount;

    public RetryRule (int retryCount) {
        this.retryCount = retryCount;
    }

    public Statement apply(Statement base, Description description) {
        return statement(base, description);
    }

    private Statement statement(final Statement base, final Description description) {
        return new Statement() {
            @Override
            public void evaluate() throws Throwable {
                Throwable caughtThrowable = null;

                // implement retry logic here
                for (int i = 0; i < retryCount; i++) {
                    try {
                        base.evaluate();
                        return;
                    } catch (Throwable t) {
                        caughtThrowable = t;
                        //  System.out.println(": run " + (i+1) + " failed");
                        System.err.println(description.getDisplayName() + ": run " + (i + 1) + " failed.");
                    }
                }
                System.err.println(description.getDisplayName() + ": giving up after " + retryCount + " failures.");
                throw caughtThrowable;
            }
        };
    }
}

Test Class:

import org.junit.BeforeClass;
import org.junit.Rule;
import org.junit.Test;
import org.openqa.selenium.WebDriver;
import org.openqa.selenium.firefox.FirefoxDriver;
import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.is;
import static org.hamcrest.MatcherAssert.assertThat;

/**
 * Created by ONUR BASKIRT on 27.03.2016.
 */
public class RetryRuleTest {

    static WebDriver driver;
    final private String URL = "http://www.swtestacademy.com";

    @BeforeClass
    public static void setupTest(){
        driver = new FirefoxDriver();
    }

    //Add this notification to your Test Class 
    @Rule
    public RetryRule retryRule = new RetryRule(3);

    @Test
    public void getURLExample() {
        //Go to www.swtestacademy.com
        driver.get(URL);

        //Check title is correct
        assertThat(driver.getTitle(), is("WRONG TITLE"));
    }
}

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