21

Take the following example:

private int[] list;

public Listing() {
    // Why can't I do this?
    list = {4, 5, 6, 7, 8};

    // I have to do this:
    int[] contents = {4, 5, 6, 7, 8};
    list = contents;
}

Why can't I use shorthand initialization? The only way I can think of getting around this is making another array and setting list to that array.

23

When you define the array on the definition line, it assumes it know what the type will be so the new int[] is redundant. However when you use assignment it doesn't assume it know the type of the array so you have specify it.

Certainly other languages don't have a problem with this, but in Java the difference is whether you are defining and initialising the fields/variable on the same line.

  • So is int[] a value- or a reference-type? – Kerrek SB Nov 28 '11 at 21:00
  • int[] is a class. You can get the Class instance with Class intArrayClass = int[].class; – Peter Lawrey Nov 28 '11 at 21:01
  • That's what I was looking for. This question came about in my AP CS class, and my teacher didn't know either. I just wanted a less hacky way of declaring the contents of an array besides creating another one. – Ethan Turkeltaub Nov 28 '11 at 22:13
23

Try list = new int[]{4, 5, 6, 7, 8};.

  • 6
    You're not really answering the concrete question. OP clearly asked why he can't use shorthand initialization, so we may assume that he's well aware that full initialization works. – BalusC Nov 28 '11 at 21:13
  • 1
    BalusC - good catch - though it is shorthand (at least compared to his work-around) - just not as short-hand as he was probably hoping for. – ziesemer Nov 28 '11 at 21:23
  • 2
    exactly what I was looking for. – Leo Ufimtsev Dec 9 '14 at 19:02
1

Besides using new Object[]{blah, blah....} Here is a slightly shorter approach to do what you want. Use the method below.

public static Object [] args(Object... vararg) {
    Object[] array = new Object[vararg.length];
    for (int i = 0; i < vararg.length; i++) {
        array[i] = vararg[i];
    }
    return array;
}

PS - Java is good, but it sucks in situations like these. Try ruby or python for your project if possible & justifiable. (Look java 8 still has no shorthand for populating a hashmap, and it took them so long to make a small change to improve developer productivity)

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