190

We have a need to be able to skip a submodule in certain environments.

The module in question contains integration tests and takes half an hour to run. So we want to include it when building on the CI server, but when developers build locally (and tests get run), we want to skip that module.

Is there a way to do this with a profile setting? I've done some googling and looked at the other questions/answers here and haven't found a good solution.

I suppose one option is to remove that submodule from the parent pom.xml entirely, and just add another project on our CI server to just build that module.

Suggestions?

2
  • Why not Maven Way? It's a perfectly valid claim to me.
    – MaDa
    Nov 29, 2011 at 13:39
  • Hmm. Now I can't find the places where people seemed to be arguing against this... so I've updated my original question to remove my claim that this doesn't seem to be "The Maven Way". Dec 2, 2011 at 14:03

6 Answers 6

289

Maven version 3.2.1 added this feature, you can use the -pl switch (shortcut for --projects list) with ! or - (source) to exclude certain submodules.

mvn -pl '!submodule-to-exclude' install
mvn -pl -submodule-to-exclude install

Be careful in bash the character ! is a special character, so you either have to single quote it (like I did) or escape it with the backslash character.

The syntax to exclude multiple module is the same as the inclusion

mvn -pl '!submodule1,!submodule2' install
mvn -pl -submodule1,-submodule2 install

EDIT Windows does not seem to like the single quotes, but it is necessary in bash ; in Windows, use double quotes (thanks @awilkinson)

mvn -pl "!submodule1,!submodule2" install
6
  • 36
    Important: if you want to exclude a nested submodule you need to use the qualified version mvn -pl !com.acme:nestedmodule1 Dec 1, 2015 at 15:26
  • 3
    The -pl option need '[groupId]:' before artifactId , so we should use mvn -pl '!:submodule-to-exclude' install
    – Honsen
    Mar 15, 2018 at 13:27
  • 6
    You can also use mvn -pl '!path/to/submodule/directory', without using groupId and artifactId. My answer works if submodule1 and submodule2 are located in the current directory. Mar 15, 2018 at 14:36
  • It's also worth nothing that if you use -pl in mvn install, you'll likely need to use it for mvn deploy as well
    – chizou
    Sep 20, 2018 at 15:55
  • Following works on windows machine. mvn -pl "!submodule1,!submodule2" clean install Jun 2, 2021 at 14:00
158

Sure, this can be done using profiles. You can do something like the following in your parent pom.xml.

  ...
   <modules>
      <module>module1</module>
      <module>module2</module>  
      ...
  </modules>
  ...
  <profiles>
     <profile>
       <id>ci</id>
          <modules>
            <module>module1</module>
            <module>module2</module>
            ...
            <module>module-integration-test</module>
          </modules> 
      </profile>
  </profiles>
 ...

In your CI, you would run maven with the ci profile, i.e. mvn -P ci clean install

7
  • 5
    Excellent answer! I don't know why I had so much trouble finding this out of the Maven docs. The one suggestion I would make is that because I prefer the integration tests to be run by default, I added activeByDefault to that profile, and then had to add another empty profile (e.g. skip-integration-tests) to be able to skip them. Nov 29, 2011 at 12:57
  • 10
    is there any way to do this without duplicating all the shared stuff?
    – JonnyRaa
    Jun 16, 2014 at 16:18
  • 8
    Beware, if you use the maven-release-plugin it would appear that it doesn't update the version number of submodules that are hidden behind a profile switch. You could have sub-modules with different version numbers to the rest of your project...
    – Ardesco
    Oct 6, 2014 at 9:17
  • 11
    Unfortunately, uing the profile you can't exclude a module earlier mentioned in the main <modules> part of the pom. The JIRA issues.apache.org/jira/browse/MNG-5230 (and whole pom structure) could have been fully-implemented so much better with a bit more careful thought.
    – Ed Randall
    Jan 9, 2018 at 10:38
  • 5
    does this solution really work? At least I can not get it to work. Seems like I have the same issue like @EdRandall
    – Gerros
    Sep 28, 2018 at 13:08
41

It's possible to decide which reactor projects to build by specifying the -pl command line argument:

$ mvn --help
[...]
 -pl,--projects <arg>                   Build specified reactor projects
                                        instead of all projects
[...]

It accepts a comma separated list of parameters in one of the following forms:

  • relative path of the folder containing the POM
  • [groupId]:artifactId

Thus, given the following structure:

project-root [com.mycorp:parent]
  |
  + --- server [com.mycorp:server]
  |       |
  |       + --- orm [com.mycorp.server:orm]
  |
  + --- client [com.mycorp:client]

You can specify the following command line:

mvn -pl .,server,:client,com.mycorp.server:orm clean install

to build everything. Remove elements in the list to build only the modules you please.


EDIT: as blackbuild pointed out, as of Maven 3.2.1 you have a new -el flag that excludes projects from the reactor, similarly to what -pl does:

5
  • 2
    Thanks. This worked well for me. Also note that you can add the "-am" (AKA "--also-make") to also build projects that are required by the modules you have specified.
    – GaZ
    Feb 20, 2013 at 14:15
  • 3
    Great! I used mvn install -pl . in order to install parent pom only in local repo without building modules.
    – Marcin
    Feb 27, 2013 at 9:38
  • Also, take a look at jira.codehaus.org/browse/MNG-5230. You can now exclude projects from the reactor.
    – blackbuild
    Mar 20, 2014 at 13:33
  • 1
    MNG-5230 link since codehaus.org closed: issues.apache.org/jira/browse/MNG-5230
    – Ed Randall
    Jan 9, 2018 at 10:33
  • Unfortunately, it doesn't work transitively, ie, if I have top/mod1/mod2, and build from top, -pl '!mod2' raises an error.
    – zakmck
    Dec 13, 2019 at 18:31
5

Given answers here for command line usage don't work currently on newer versions of maven (at least 3.8) You also need to add ':'

mvn -pl '!:mymodule' install
1
  • we have double hierarchy of reactors and this doesnt seem to work to exclude on of the middle level reaktor modules.
    – U.V.
    Mar 4 at 1:09
4

The notion of multi-module projects is there to service the needs of codependent segments of a project. Such a client depends on the services which in turn depends on say EJBs or data-access routines. You could group your continuous integration (CI) tests in this manner. I would rationalize that by saying that the CI tests need to be in lock-step with application logic changes.

Suppose your project is structured as:

project-root
  |
  + --- ci
  |
  + --- client
  |
  + --- server

The project-root/pom.xml defines modules

<modules>
  <module>ci</module>
  <module>client</module>
  <module>server</module>
</modules>

The ci/pom.xml defines profiles such as:

... 
<profiles>
  <profile>
    <id>default</id>
    <activation>
      <activeByDefault>true</activeByDefault>
    </activation>
    <plugin>
       <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
       <configuration>
         <skip>true</skip>
       </configuration>
     </plugin>
  </profile>
  <profile>
    <id>CI</id>
    <plugin>
       <artifactId>maven-surefire-plugin</artifactId>
       <configuration>
         <skip>false</skip>
       </configuration>
     </plugin>
  </profile>
</profiles>

This will result in Maven skipping tests in this module except when the profile named CI is active. Your CI server must be instructed to execute mvn clean package -P CI. The Maven web site has an in-depth explanation of the profiling mechanism.

2

there is now (from 1.1.1 version) a 'skip' flag in pit.

So you can do things like :

    <profile>
        <id>pit</id>
        <build>
            <plugins>
                <plugin>
                    <groupId>org.pitest</groupId>
                    <artifactId>pitest-maven</artifactId>
                    <configuration>
                        <skip>true</skip>
                    </configuration>
                </plugin>
            </plugins>
        </build>
    </profile>

in your module, and pit will skip

[INFO] --- pitest-maven:1.1.3:mutationCoverage (default-cli) @ module-selenium --- [INFO] Skipping project

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