2

I've written a lambda expression that produces the expected results however it generates an absolutely massive sql query and it has bad performance. See very bottom for io/time statistics.

Is there another way to achieve the below query?

select distinct(searchterms) as SearchTerms, max(totalresults) FROM cmsSearchLog 
where totalresults != 0 and searchterms like 'de%' group by searchterms 
order by max(totalresults) desc

The c# code snippets:

// current lamda expression; has bad performance compared to above query
List<SearchTerm> existingSearchTerms1 = context.cmsSearchLogs.Where(oq =>
context.cmsSearchLogs.Where(q =>
q.SearchTerms.ToLower().Contains(terms.ToLower()) && q.TotalResults != 0)
.Select(s => s.SearchTerms)
.Distinct()
.Contains(oq.SearchTerms))
.Select(a => new { a.SearchTerms, a.TotalResults })
.GroupBy(gb => gb.SearchTerms)
.OrderByDescending(ob => ob.Max(m => m.TotalResults))
.Select(s => new SearchTerm()
    {
        SearchTerms = s.FirstOrDefault().SearchTerms,
        TotalResults = s.FirstOrDefault().TotalResults
    }
)
.ToList();

// get the suggestions back as a list of strings
List<string> suggestions = Enumerable.Range(0, 
  existingSearchTerms1.Count())
  .Select(x => existingSearchTerms1.ElementAt(x).SearchTerms).ToList();

This is the private class to hold the results from the query

private class SearchTerm
{
    public string SearchTerms { get; set; }
    public int TotalResults { get; set; }
}

The sql generated by the lambda expression is huge:

SELECT 
[Project13].[C2] AS [C1], 
[Project13].[C3] AS [C2], 
[Project13].[C4] AS [C3]
FROM ( SELECT 
    [Project12].[C1] AS [C1], 
    1 AS [C2], 
    [Project12].[C2] AS [C3], 
    [Project12].[C3] AS [C4]
    FROM ( SELECT 
        [Project8].[C1] AS [C1], 
        [Project8].[C2] AS [C2], 
        (SELECT TOP (1) 
            [Extent5].[TotalResults] AS [TotalResults]
            FROM [dbo].[cmsSearchLog] AS [Extent5]
            WHERE ( EXISTS (SELECT 1 AS [C1]                    
               FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT 
            [Extent6].[SearchTerms] AS [SearchTerms]
            FROM [dbo].[cmsSearchLog] AS [Extent6]
            WHERE (( CAST(CHARINDEX(LOWER('dew'), 
                             LOWER([Extent6].[SearchTerms])) AS int)) > 0) 
                             AND (0 <> [Extent6].[TotalResults])
                )  AS [Distinct3]
            WHERE [Distinct3].[SearchTerms] = [Extent5].[SearchTerms]
            )) AND ([Project8].[SearchTerms] = [Extent5].[SearchTerms])) 
                                AS [C3]
        FROM ( SELECT 
           [Project7].[C1] AS [C1], 
           [Project7].[SearchTerms] AS [SearchTerms], 
           [Project7].[C2] AS [C2]
           FROM ( SELECT 
              [Project3].[C1] AS [C1], 
              [Project3].[SearchTerms] AS [SearchTerms], 
              (SELECT TOP (1) 
              [Extent3].[SearchTerms] AS [SearchTerms]
              FROM [dbo].[cmsSearchLog] AS [Extent3]
              WHERE ( EXISTS (SELECT 1 AS [C1] FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT 
            [Extent4].[SearchTerms] AS [SearchTerms]
            FROM [dbo].[cmsSearchLog] AS [Extent4]
            WHERE (( CAST(CHARINDEX(LOWER('dew'), 
                             LOWER([Extent4].[SearchTerms])) AS int)) > 0) 
                             AND (0 <> [Extent4].[TotalResults]))  AS [Distinct2] 
           WHERE [Distinct2].[SearchTerms] = [Extent3].[SearchTerms]
               )) AND ([Project3].[SearchTerms] = [Extent3].[SearchTerms])) AS [C2]
                FROM ( SELECT 
                  [GroupBy1].[A1] AS [C1], 
                  [GroupBy1].[K1] AS [SearchTerms]
                  FROM ( SELECT 
                   [Extent1].[SearchTerms] AS [K1], 
                   MAX([Extent1].[TotalResults]) AS [A1]
                   FROM [dbo].[cmsSearchLog] AS [Extent1]
                   WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 AS [C1]
                FROM ( SELECT DISTINCT [Extent2].[SearchTerms]
                  AS [SearchTerms] FROM [dbo].[cmsSearchLog] AS [Extent2]
                        WHERE (( CAST(CHARINDEX(LOWER('dew'),
                                      LOWER([Extent2].[SearchTerms])) AS int)) > 0)
                                       AND (0 <> [Extent2].[TotalResults]))  AS [Distinct1]
                                       WHERE [Distinct1].[SearchTerms] = [Extent1].[SearchTerms])
                 GROUP BY [Extent1].[SearchTerms])  AS [GroupBy1]
                )  AS [Project3]
            )  AS [Project7]
        )  AS [Project8]
    )  AS [Project12]
)  AS [Project13]
ORDER BY [Project13].[C1] ASC

I executed both queries with io and time statistics turned on and the results are below. (note: the lambda generated query is first, my hand written query second) So this confirms my suspicion that the generated query is performing horribly compared to the query I actually want.

(8 row(s) affected)
Table 'cmsSearchLog'. Scan count 6, logical reads 106, physical reads 0, 
read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 0 ms,  elapsed time = 1 ms.

(7 row(s) affected)
Table 'cmsSearchLog'. Scan count 1, logical reads 5, physical reads 0, 
read-ahead reads 0, lob logical reads 0, lob physical reads 0, lob read-ahead reads 0.

SQL Server Execution Times:
   CPU time = 0 ms,  elapsed time = 0 ms.
  • 1
    No one has ever claimed that linq to sql would generate perfect sql every time. This looks like a great place to use a hand optimized stored procedure instead of a lambda generated call. – asawyer Nov 29 '11 at 3:29
6

Try this query instead of your current LINQ query:

var query = from x in context.cmsSearchLog
            where totalresults != 0 &&
                  searchterms.BeginsWith("de")
            group x by x.searchterms into terms
            select new {
                           SearchTerms = terms.Key(),
                           TotalResults = terms.Max(t => t.totalresults)
                       };

I haven't tested it, but I assume it would generate a pretty efficient query and return the desired results.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Perfect, exactly what I was looking for! I had to move the where clause before the group by in order for it to execute. The sql it generates is virtually the same as the query I hand coded and its performance is great. Thanks! – TugboatCaptain Nov 29 '11 at 5:54
  • no problem, glad it worked for you. I'll update my answer too and move the group by. – shuniar Nov 29 '11 at 12:04
1

LINQ translation (be it LINQ to SQL, Entity Framework, etc.) is about efficient development. It allows (in theory) for more readable, maintainable code, and a reduced likelihood of runtime database errors due to fat-fingering, etc. LINQ is not about performance. LINQ usually provides "good enough" performance, but it's never going to beat out something closer to the metal like a hand-coded query or stored procedure.

That said, your queries return different row counts, so one (or both) of them is wrong; the first query produces 8 rows, while the second produces 7. You can't very well compare queries that provide different results!

| improve this answer | |
  • Simple. The Lambda is horrific inefficient with multi level selects, distinct etc. - that horrific SQL is totally the fault of the programmer, not of the technology in question. – TomTom Mar 6 '14 at 19:41
  • @AdamRobinson I am not the actual downvoter but I suspect that it was done due to the fact that what you wrote here as an 'Answer' is not the actual answer of the OP's question rather some explanation and side-notes. It would have been a better option to write them as a Comment to OP's question. – user1451111 Apr 1 '19 at 1:52
0

For complicated or performance-intensive queries, don't feel like you can't create a view or user-defined function and map to that instead. In this case, you could even use a stored proc and map to that.

| improve this answer | |
0

Why not just let your database handle the work on this query and dump the results directly into your SearchTerm class? You can parameterize the procedure if you need to look for specific terms. In the example you provided you can further improve performance by indexing the searchterms column since your wildcard in the where clause references the trailing portion of the column value text. Additionally, since you're grouping on searchterms there is no need to call distinct on that column (this may or may not improve performance, depending on what query plan your system chooses to execute).

| improve this answer | |
0

First of all, you need to know that the lambda expression approach is not for this kind of query. But, if you are ok with a hack, create a view that uses:

select distinct searchTerm, max(totalresults) 
from cmsSearchLog 
group by searchterms 
order by max(totalresults) desc

then use your lambda expression to do the filtering part

| improve this answer | |

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