var obj = {
    name: "Simon",
    age: "20",
    clothing: {
        style: "simple",
        hipster: false
    }
}

for(var propt in obj){
    alert(propt + ': ' + obj[propt]);
}

How does the variable propt represent the properties of the object? It's not a built-in method, or property. Then why does it come up with every property in the object?

  • 7
    if (typeof(obj[propt]) === 'object') {/* Do it again */ } – noob Nov 29 '11 at 14:39
  • 11
    Well, really sorry for this question. I know what a loop is, I couldn't get my head around "looping through object properties", which I think is cleared now. Also, they have recommended me "JavaScript Step by Step 2nd Edition - Steve Suehring at school. – Rafay Nov 29 '11 at 14:39
  • 182
    This is a fine begginers question. I'd add that I have 15 years of professional experience with other languages and I needed this answer. I'd plus 2000 if I could. – Nathan C. Tresch Feb 1 '13 at 13:28
  • 36
    Crazy, but I've been coming to this page every few months for years to relearn the syntax on how to do this. I don't bother to remember how to do this... I just remember that this page is always here on SO. – HDave Jul 9 '15 at 15:29
  • 4
    This is the strangest page I've seen on StackOverflow. If you read the question carefully, only one answer even begins to attempt to answer what is actually being asked, and it has a score of -6. The highest scoring answer, which was accepted, not only doesn't answer, but is simply wrong. – user1106925 Apr 4 '17 at 15:31

25 Answers 25

Iterating over properties requires this additional hasOwnProperty check:

for (var property in object) {
    if (object.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
        // do stuff
    }
}

It's necessary because an object's prototype contains additional properties for the object which are technically part of the object. These additional properties are inherited from the base object class, but are still properties of object.

hasOwnProperty simply checks to see if this is a property specific to this class, and not one inherited from the base class.

  • 18
    @B T According to the Mozilla documentation: "If you only want to consider properties attached to the object itself, and not its prototypes, use getOwnPropertyNames or perform a hasOwnProperty check (propertyIsEnumerable can also be used)." – davidmdem Aug 6 '13 at 19:47
  • 3
    What exactly is the point of calling object.hasOwnProperty()? Doesn't the fact that property has whatever value imply that its in object? – Alex S Apr 21 '14 at 19:48
  • 3
    Because, Alex S, an object's prototype contains additional properties for the object which are technically part of the object. They are inherited from the base object class, but they are still properties. hasOwnProperty simply checks to see if this is a property specific to this class, and not one inherited from the base class. A good explanation: brianflove.com/2013/09/05/javascripts-hasownproperty-method – Kyle Richter Apr 28 '14 at 20:02
  • 73
    I feel that I should mention, however, that Object.keys(obj) is now a much better solution for getting the keys of the object itself. Link to the Mozilla documentation: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Kyle Richter Apr 28 '14 at 20:07
  • 6
    One important piece of information is missing. property is a string here, should have been called propertyName. Otherwise can cause confusion for JS newbies like myself, i.e. what to do inside the if. – Neolisk Jul 20 '16 at 15:57

As of JavaScript 1.8.5 you can use Object.keys(obj) to get an Array of properties defined on the object itself (the ones that return true for obj.hasOwnProperty(key)).

Object.keys(obj).forEach(function(key,index) {
    // key: the name of the object key
    // index: the ordinal position of the key within the object 
});

This is better (and more readable) than using a for-in loop.

Its supported on these browsers:

  • Firefox (Gecko): 4 (2.0)
  • Chrome: 5
  • Internet Explorer: 9

See the Mozilla Developer Network Object.keys()'s reference for futher information.

  • 5
    This is now more widely supported: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Dom Vinyard Jan 29 '14 at 14:00
  • 3
    And if you need support for old browsers, you can use this polyfill – KyleMit May 5 '14 at 15:55
  • 25
    In environments that support this language construct, this method allows Array.foreach to be called: Object.keys(myObject).forEach(function(key,index) { //key = the name of the object key //index = the ordinal position of the key within the object }); – Todd Price Nov 6 '14 at 18:46
  • 2
    Good solution. But how to break the iteration?! – AJ_83 Jan 25 '17 at 8:19
  • 2
    @AJ_83 There's no good way to break out of a forEach(). Use some() in this case, and return true to break – Daniel Ziegler Mar 23 '17 at 10:47

It's the for...in statement (MDN, ECMAScript spec).

You can read it as "FOR every property IN the obj object, assign each property to the PROPT variable in turn".

  • 21
    Agree with @RightSaidFred, the in operator and the for statement are not involved at all, the for-in statement represents a grammar production on its own: for ( LeftHandSideExpression in Expression ), for ( var VariableDeclarationNoIn in Expression ) – CMS Nov 29 '11 at 15:08
  • 2
    Odd this answer has so many up votes, especially since these popular comments seem to contradict it. – Doug Molineux Aug 22 '13 at 21:46
  • 8
    Why is this marked as the answer? It is quite possibly the least helpful one in this thread.. – computrius Dec 12 '13 at 17:48
  • 1
    @PeteHerbertPenito, odd that nobody bothered to edit the answer until I did. – Dan Dascalescu Apr 17 '14 at 8:09
  • 2
    Least helpful answer? Depends what you think the OP was asking; when I first read the question it seemed like baffled bemusement about the mechanism by which a variable can be used to inspect an object's properties, and which this answer explains eloquently (the 'for-in' misnomer notwithstanding). The question "Why does it come up with every property" I see could imply the OP was looking for hasOwnProperty but doesn't know it, but I think it's more likely this was what the OP wanted to know, and has incorrectly accepted a correct answer to a different question. :-) – Bumpy Sep 21 '16 at 9:13

Girls and guys we are in 2017 and we do not have that much time for typing... So lets do this cool new fancy ECMAScript 2016:

Object.keys(obj).forEach(e => console.log(`key=${e}  value=${obj[e]}`));
  • 9
    How is this any different than Danny R's answer? – krillgar Jan 11 '17 at 15:37
  • 14
    It is a oneliner and uses map instead of forEach. And also the console.log satement is maybe interesting for some people. – Frank Roth Jan 12 '17 at 16:08
  • 3
    If you didn't directly copy this snippet and are wondering why your console log message is being treated as a string, don't forget to use backticks ( ` ) instead of single-quotes ( ' ) xD – kayleeFrye_onDeck Apr 19 '17 at 18:58
  • 5
    If you want to save 2 more characters, you could get rid of the () around the e argument... Object.keys(obj).map(e => console.log(`key=${e} value=${obj[e]}`)) – Grant May 3 '17 at 2:39
  • 14
    forEach is more appropriate here. map() is more appropriate when you want to transform the data and use the value returned by map(). When you are using forEach you are explicit that you are only iterating for the side effects and not for transformation. – Ski Oct 31 '17 at 12:52

In upcoming versions of ES, you can use Object.entries:

for (const [key, value] of Object.entries(obj)) { }

or

Object.entries(obj).forEach(([key, value]) => ...)

If you just want to iterate over the values, then use Object.values:

for (const value of Object.values(obj)) { }

or

Object.values(obj).forEach(value => ...)
  • this would be the best solution (object.entries...), but I can't use it. When you want to do this multiple times and can't support it in your framework, you can use the polyfill on this page: developer.mozilla.org/nl/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Mario Oct 4 '17 at 8:21
  • The third suggestion is great if you only the properties' values. Awesome! – Ginzburg Apr 24 at 16:02

It's just a for...in loop. Check out the documentation at Mozilla.

  • 16
    that's a pretty basic distinction, not in-and-of-itself worthy of the merit you have assigned. This is a poorly written answer lacking context and application to the original question. – FlavorScape Mar 20 '14 at 21:33
  • 1
    This answer is still much better than most of the answers which completely fail to address the question. – developerbmw Sep 30 '17 at 1:58

jquery allows you to do this now:

$.each( obj, function( key, value ) {
  alert( key + ": " + value );
});
  • $.each({foo:1, length:0, bar:2}, function(k,v){console.log(k,v)}) $.each is not suitable for objects. If an object happens to have a length property and its value happens to be zero, the whole object is treated as if it were an empty array. – Bob Stein Apr 4 at 12:25
  • Details why I think this is a bug-inviting approach. – Bob Stein Apr 4 at 14:43

If your environment supports ES2017 then I would recommend Object.entries:

Object.entries(obj).forEach(([key, value]) => {
  console.log(`${key} ${value}`);
});

As shown in Mozillas Object.entries() documentation:

The Object.entries() method returns an array of a given object's own enumerable property [key, value] pairs, in the same order as that provided by a for...in loop (the difference being that a for-in loop enumerates properties in the prototype chain as well).

Basically with Object.entries we can forgo the following extra step that is required with the older for...in loop:

// This step is not necessary with Object.entries
if (object.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
  // do stuff
}

The above answers are a bit annoying because they don't explain what you do inside the for loop after you ensure it's an object: YOU DON'T ACCESS IT DIRECTLY! You are actually only delivered the KEY that you need to apply to the OBJ:

var obj = {
  a: "foo",
  b: "bar",
  c: "foobar"
};

// We need to iterate the string keys (not the objects)
for(var someKey in obj)
{
  // We check if this key exists in the obj
  if (obj.hasOwnProperty(someKey))
  {
    // someKey is only the KEY (string)! Use it to get the obj:
    var myActualPropFromObj = obj[someKey]; // Since dynamic, use [] since the key isn't literally named "someKey"

    // NOW you can treat it like an obj
    var shouldBeBar = myActualPropFromObj.b;
  }
}

This is all ECMA5 safe. Even works in the lame JS versions like Rhino ;)

Dominik's answer is perfect, I just prefer to do it that way, as it's cleaner to read:

for (var property in object) {
    if (!object.hasOwnProperty(property)) continue;

    // Do stuff...
}

The for...in loop represents each property in an object because it is just like a for loop. You defined propt in the for...in loop by doing:

    for(var propt in obj){
alert(propt + ': ' + obj[propt]);
}

A for...in loop iterates through the enumerable properties of an object. Whichever variable you define, or put in the for...in loop, changes each time it goes to the next property it iterates. The variable in the for...in loop iterates through the keys, but the value of it is the key's value. For example:

    for(var propt in obj) {
      console.log(propt);//logs name
      console.log(obj[propt]);//logs "Simon"
    }

You can see how the variable differs from the variable's value. In contrast, a for...of loop does the opposite.

I hope this helps.

You can use Lodash. The documentation

var obj = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3};
_.keys(obj).forEach(function (key) {
    ...
});
  • 8
    Why on earth does this "answer" have 10 upvotes? It completely fails to answer the question. I'm beginning to lose faith in the intelligence on the average JS developer. – developerbmw Sep 30 '17 at 1:53
  • 1
    @developerbmw I understand that using ES6 features is more right way, but I've answered a year ago. Please, share your thoughts with us when you have a minute. – viktarpunko Oct 2 '17 at 8:20
  • 1
    The idea is to focus more on native methods, instead of suggesting the user add a 10000 line library to their page. Don't get me wrong, I do like using Lodash but there's a time and a place for it and it isn't this. – Will Hoskings Jun 19 at 19:58
let obj = {"a": 3, "b": 2, "6": "a"}

Object.keys(obj).map((item) => {console.log("item", obj[item])})

// a
// 3
// 2

Objects in JavaScript are collections of properties and can therefore be looped in a for each statement.

You should think of obj as an key value collection.

  • ! with the important difference that these 'lists of properties' can have names as keys, while normal JS arrays can only have numbers as keys. – Qqwy Nov 29 '11 at 14:38

Nowadays you can convert a standard JS object into an iterable object just by adding a Symbol.iterator method. Then you can use a for of loop and acceess its values directly or even can use a spread operator on the object too. Cool. Let's see how we can make it:

var o = {a:1,b:2,c:3},
    a = [];
o[Symbol.iterator] = function*(){
                       var ok = Object.keys(this);
                            i = 0;
                       while (i < ok.length) yield this[ok[i++]];
                     };
for (var value of o) console.log(value);
// or you can even do like
a = [...o];
console.log(a);

  • 1
    Interesting way to do that. Thanks for the function* discovery! – Benj Jan 27 '17 at 10:22

Your for loop is iterating over all of the properties of the object obj. propt is defined in the first line of your for loop. It is a string that is a name of a property of the obj object. In the first iteration of the loop, propt would be "name".

Object.keys(obj).forEach(key =>
  console.log(`key=${key} value=${obj[key]}`)
);

Also adding the recursive way:

function iterate(obj) {
    // watch for objects we've already iterated so we won't end in endless cycle
    // for cases like var foo = {}; foo.bar = foo; iterate(foo);
    var walked = [];
    var stack = [{obj: obj, stack: ''}];
    while(stack.length > 0)
    {
        var item = stack.pop();
        var obj = item.obj;
        for (var property in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
                if (typeof obj[property] == "object") {
                  // check if we haven't iterated through the reference yet
                  var alreadyFound = false;
                  for(var i = 0; i < walked.length; i++)
                  {
                    if (walked[i] === obj[property])
                    {
                      alreadyFound = true;
                      break;
                    }
                  }
                  // new object reference
                  if (!alreadyFound)
                  {
                    walked.push(obj[property]);
                    stack.push({obj: obj[property], stack: item.stack + '.' + property});
                  }
                }
                else
                {
                    console.log(item.stack + '.' + property + "=" + obj[property]);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Usage:

iterate({ foo: "foo", bar: { foo: "foo"} }); 
  • could you explain 'alreadyFound' logic – Faiz Mohamed Haneef Feb 21 '16 at 15:55
  • 1
    @faiz - see my comments, it is safeguard against being stuck in endless loop when you recurrently walk trough object that has cyclic references – Ondrej Svejdar Feb 22 '16 at 8:36
  • ok. checkout my below soln as well. thanks – Faiz Mohamed Haneef Feb 22 '16 at 10:21

If running Node I'd recommend:

Object.keys(obj).forEach((key, index) => {
    console.log(key);
});

I want to add to the answers above, because you might have different intentions from Javascript. A JSON object and a Javascript object are different things, and you might want to iterate through the properties of a JSON object using the solutions proposed above, and then be surprised.

Suppose that you have a JSON object like:

var example = {
    "prop1": "value1",
    "prop2": [ "value2_0", value2_1"],
    "prop3": {
         "prop3_1": "value3_1"
    }
}

The wrong way to iterate through its 'properties':

function recursivelyIterateProperties(jsonObject) {
    for (var prop in Object.keys(example)) {
        console.log(prop);
        recursivelyIterateProperties(jsonObject[prop]);
    }
}

You might be surprised of seeing the console logging 0, 1, etc. when iterating through the properties of prop1 and prop2 and of prop3_1. Those objects are sequences, and the indexes of a sequence are properties of that object in Javascript.

A better way to recursively iterate through a JSON object properties would be to first check if that object is a sequence or not:

function recursivelyIterateProperties(jsonObject) {
    for (var prop in Object.keys(example)) {
        console.log(prop);
        if (!(typeof(jsonObject[prop]) === 'string')
            && !(jsonObject[prop] instanceof Array)) {
                recursivelyIterateProperties(jsonObject[prop]);

            }

     }
}

Here I am iterating each node and creating meaningful node names. If you notice, instanceOf Array and instanceOf Object pretty much does the same thing (in my application, i am giving different logic though)

function iterate(obj,parent_node) {
    parent_node = parent_node || '';
    for (var property in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(property)) {
            var node = parent_node + "/" + property;
            if(obj[property] instanceof Array) {
                //console.log('array: ' + node + ":" + obj[property]);
                iterate(obj[property],node)
            } else if(obj[property] instanceof Object){
                //console.log('Object: ' + node + ":" + obj[property]);
                iterate(obj[property],node)
            }
            else {
                console.log(node + ":" + obj[property]);
            }
        }
    }
}

note - I am inspired by Ondrej Svejdar's answer. But this solution has better performance and less ambiguous

You basically want to loop through each property in the object.

JSFiddle

var Dictionary = {
  If: {
    you: {
      can: '',
      make: ''
    },
    sense: ''
  },
  of: {
    the: {
      sentence: {
        it: '',
        worked: ''
      }
    }
  }
};

function Iterate(obj) {
  for (prop in obj) {
    if (obj.hasOwnProperty(prop) && isNaN(prop)) {
      console.log(prop + ': ' + obj[prop]);
      Iterate(obj[prop]);
    }
  }
}
Iterate(Dictionary);
  • obj(prop) <-- TypeError: obj is not a function – le_m Jun 23 '16 at 21:31
  • @le_m my bad. I must of accidentally taken out the hasOwnProperty attribute. It should work now. – HovyTech Jun 23 '16 at 22:29

To further refine the accepted answer it's worth noting that if you instantiate the object with a var object = Object.create(null) then object.hasOwnProperty(property) will trigger a TypeError. So to be on the safe side, you'd need to call it from the prototype like this:

for (var property in object) {
    if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(object, property)) {
        // do stuff
    }
}

To add ES2015's usage of Reflect.ownKeys(obj) and also iterating over the properties via an iterator.

For example:

let obj = { a: 'Carrot', b: 'Potato', Car: { doors: 4 } };

can be iterated over by

// logs each key
Reflect.ownKeys(obj).forEach(key => console.log(key));

If you would like to iterate directly over the values of the keys of an object, you can define an iterator, just like JavaScipts's default iterators for strings, arrays, typed arrays, Map and Set.

JS will attempt to iterate via the default iterator property, which must be defined as Symbol.iterator.

If you want to be able to iterate over all objects you can add it as a prototype of Object:

Object.prototype[Symbol.iterator] = function*() { 
    for(p of Reflect.ownKeys(this)){ yield this[p]; }
}

This would enable you to iterate over the values of an object with a for...of loop, for example:

for(val of obj) { console.log('Value is:' + val ) }

Caution: As of writing this answer (June 2018) all other browsers, but IE, support generators and for...of iteration via Symbol.iterator

What for..in loop does is that it creates a new variable (var someVariable) and then stores each property of the given object in this new variable(someVariable) one by one. Therefore if you use block {}, you can iterate. Consider the following example.

var obj = {
     name:'raman',
     hobby:'coding',
     planet:'earth'
     };

for(var someVariable in obj) {
  //do nothing..
}

console.log(someVariable); // outputs planet
  • Upvoting this, given it's simplicity. In my use case I need to check all the attributes in an object for dodgy values-NaNs, nulls, undefined (they were points on a graph and these values prevented the graph from drawing). To get the value instead of the name, in the loop you would just do obj[someVariable]. Perhaps the reason it was downvoted so much is because it is not recursive. So this would not be an adequate solution if you have a highly structured object. – Katharine Osborne Apr 27 at 9:50

protected by Pankaj Parkar Feb 3 '16 at 9:37

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