11

I have a div with an id of "button". I am trying to change its background to become blue when I hover (without using the CSS hover selector).

var item = document.getElementById("button");
item.addEventListener("mouseover", func, false);

function func()
{  
   var item = document.getElementById("button");
   item.setAttribute("style", "background-color:blue;")
}

This, however, only sets the color of the item to blue when I hover, but does not reset it to white after I move mouse away. How can I correct this? (btw, mouseenter and mouseleave do not work with this seemingly).

18

You will need to setup a similar event to handle mouseout. Inside the mouseout event function, you can change the color back to the original color.

var item = document.getElementById("button");
item.addEventListener("mouseover", func, false);
item.addEventListener("mouseout", func1, false);

function func()
{  // not needed since item is already global, 
   // I am assuming this is here just because it's sample code?
   // var item = document.getElementById("button"); 
   item.setAttribute("style", "background-color:blue;")
}

function func1()
{  
   item.setAttribute("style", "background-color:green;")
}
  • Ahh...great! I have an image inside my div and it considers that as "out", any way to mask that so it still thinks it is within the box? – antonpug Nov 29 '11 at 22:32
  • Yes, the mouseover and mouseout events catch all the events from the children as well (and they bubble up). In your functions, you'll have to compare the relatedTarget (W3C) or toTarget/fromTarget (IE) property on the event parameter. Take a look at this link for more info: quirksmode.org/js/events_mouse.html#relatedtarget – AndrewR Nov 29 '11 at 22:42
  • It's a lot of work to capture just the parent container and not handle anything from child elements. Unless you have any specific reason not to, you could simplify your code by using jQuery's hover() function. – AndrewR Nov 29 '11 at 22:45
  • you can set these attributes using this.setAttribute instead of the variable name inside func() and func1(), which is incredibly convenient for me right this very moment. Could anyone explain how that is happening? Might have to make a new post. – James Aug 7 '14 at 6:05
1

Have you tried mouseout?

(Unfortunately the event "mouseover" was poorly named - it would've been better if it had been called "mousein" so that it was more obviously and intuitively the opposite of "mouseout". But that's just one of many inconsistent event things.)

I think mouseenter and mouseleave are IE things that other browsers may not support - though I think jQuery supports those events too.

  • mouseout works...but is there also something like mousein? mousein doesn't work – antonpug Nov 29 '11 at 22:30
  • No, no, there is no "mousein". The two events are definitely "mouseover" and "mouseout". What I meant was that the existing "mouseover" event should have been called "mousein" so that it was a more obvious opposite to "mouseout". But it wasn't. I've edited my answer to try to make that a bit clearer. – nnnnnn Nov 29 '11 at 22:54

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