3

I have a class:

class Cat {
   Cat();
   Tail longTail;
}

I am not sure about a proper way to write constructor for it. I don't want to make longTail a pointer for non-related reason.

Cat::Cat() : longTail(length) {...} 

That one doesn't fit because length is calculated in constructor, based on static members values at the moment of creation; (Poor practices upstream);


The question is

Cat::Cat() 
{
   int length;
   ...
   longTail = Tail(length);
}

How many times does creation and copying of Tail objects happen? They are CPU-expensive to both create and copy, and I need thousands of cats. It seems to me, this constructor first creates a default Tail object in longTail, after that it creates noname Tail object on the right of assignment, then runs operator= on longTail and noname Tail. Am I right? If yes, how should I write it instead to preserve CPU? I repeat: longTail needs a parameter, that is calculated in the constructor, and I can't edit Tail class.

2
  • 1
    Have you actually tested that efficiency is a problem? Nov 30, 2011 at 7:59
  • Each Tail has a float array[80][80] and I'm writing for embedded. Yes, it IS a problem to sqeeze out every CPU cycle of parts I may edit;
    – user297171
    Nov 30, 2011 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

8

In your second version your Tail-object will be default-initialized before the body of the constructor is run. In the body you create a second Tail-object and assign it to the first one.

To enable correct construction in the initializer-list, you could wrap the computation of the parameters in a static member-function (since, as you said, it only depends in static members):

class Cat {
public:
    Cat() : longTail(calculateLength()) {...} 

private:
    static int calculateLength() {}
5
  • Cat::Cat() inside the class ? Nov 30, 2011 at 8:37
  • @Nawaz: Copy-paste-mistake - fixed. Nov 30, 2011 at 8:39
  • @curiousguy: Thanks, fixed. You should know that you can fix things like typos yourself. Nov 30, 2011 at 9:13
  • @BjörnPollex "You should know that you can fix things like typos yourself" there is this "edit" button, but then it says "Avoid trivial, tiny one-letter edits unless absolutely necessary." and it did not seem absolutely necessary.
    – curiousguy
    Nov 30, 2011 at 9:17
  • I really dislike this style where you have to move code that is naturally part of your constructor to an axillary function (here calculateLength()), only in order to use the constructor-init-list. (But in this case, it is apparently unavoidable.) To me, it shows why designs where a parameter can only be set at construction should be avoided where possible.
    – curiousguy
    Nov 30, 2011 at 9:27
0

It seems to me, this constructor first creates a default Tail object in longTail, after that it creates noname Tail object on the right of assignment, then runs operator= on longTail and noname Tail. Am I right?

Yes.

If yes, how should I write it instead to preserve CPU?

Possible alternative: do not assign to longTail, fill longTail in place:

longTail.resize (length);
// or
longTail.reserve (length);
longTail.append (x).

Do you have realistic data sets to test your code?

Did you tried to profile your code?

11
  • 1
    You assume that Tail has methods resize, reserve and append - how so? Nov 30, 2011 at 8:07
  • Exactly that is the problem. Length is set only in constructor and I may not edit the Tail class any way.
    – user297171
    Nov 30, 2011 at 8:12
  • And Cat may not contain pointers dure to some guys' brilliant idea to do memory encryption in 'new' operator.
    – user297171
    Nov 30, 2011 at 8:18
  • @BjörnPollex The OP provided very few information in his question about Tail; I assume it was vector-like.
    – curiousguy
    Nov 30, 2011 at 9:08
  • @BarafuAlbino "Length is set only in constructor" Oh, I see. I did not get the "only in constructor part" at first. "And Cat may not contain pointers" so you cannot even have a fast swap function. "some guys' brilliant idea to do memory encryption in 'new' operator" WTF???!!!
    – curiousguy
    Nov 30, 2011 at 9:11

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