40

Is there an existing Java library which provides a method to strip all HTML tags from a String? I'm looking for something equivalent to the strip_tags function in PHP.

I know that I can use a regex as described in this Stackoverflow question, however I was curious if there may already be a stripTags() method floating around somewhere in the Apache Commons library that can be used.

  • 3
    In the meantime I am using the following code to strip all HTML tags from the string: String strippedHtml = rawHtml.replaceAll("<(.|\n)*?>", ""); – Todd May 7 '09 at 2:49

13 Answers 13

33

Use JSoup, it's well documented, available on Maven and after a day of spending time with several libraries, for me, it is the best one i can imagine.. My own opinion is, that a job like that, parsing html into plain-text, should be possible in one line of code -> otherwise the library has failed somehow... just saying ^^ So here it is, the one-liner of JSoup - in Markdown4J, something like that is not possible, in Markdownj too, in htmlCleaner this is pain in the ass with somewhat about 50 lines of code...

String plain = new HtmlToPlainText().getPlainText(Jsoup.parse(html));

And what you got is real plain-text (not just the html-source-code as a String, like in other libs lol) -> he really does a great job on that. It is more or less the same quality as Markdownify for PHP....

  • The problem with Jsoup is that it also removes new lines, so all of the parsed input will be on a single line. – johnflan Jan 9 '14 at 21:00
  • And that the result can contain HTML tags if the input contains "%gt;tag&lt;" or similar. – Jules Jan 25 '14 at 5:09
  • ok Jules but then it is not a problem of JSoup..are others better in that? it doesn't matter because it feels still better for me to simply decode the url-encoded html string before giving him to JSoup instead of writing several hundert lines of code to achieve that what JSoup does (if another lib here would be better in that particular thing) – jebbie May 21 '14 at 16:01
  • @johnflan Not only does it convert newlines to space, but it also converts certain spaces to newlines! Haven't looked at the source code but this appears to happen if you have a TextNode which consists of a single space. I don't know the logic behind this, but as it says in the Javadoc for HtmlToPlainText, "Note that this is a fairly simplistic formatter -- for real world use you'll want to embrace and extend." – mike rodent Feb 21 '17 at 20:30
  • Probably HtmlToPlainText is from an old version. Now it's just Jsoup.parse(html).text(). – OrangeDog Oct 31 '18 at 17:08
29

This is what I found on google on it. For me it worked fine.

String noHTMLString = htmlString.replaceAll("\\<.*?\\>", "");
  • 2
    Won't this remove non html tags like <hello> ? – Abhilash Mar 19 '13 at 10:24
  • 2
    i don't believe a short regex like this can cover all cases of html... what is about special formatting? good libraries like JSoup even take care about formatting when generating plain-text (!)... i mean, transformation, you will never achieve this with regex only – jebbie Jul 28 '13 at 12:52
  • Maybe some code could read and use a valid DTD – Jakob Alexander Eichler Sep 22 '13 at 8:09
  • 1
    I suggest to add &lt; &gt; tags too. String noHTMLString = htmlString.replaceAll("(\\<.*?\\>|&lt;.*?&gt;)", ""); By the way it removes non html tags like <hello> – Jeff_Alieffson May 26 '16 at 8:09
  • 1
    And, as a warning, you should always keep in mind one of the most legendary answers on Stack Overflow: stackoverflow.com/a/1732454/256788 – Petri Pellinen Feb 28 '18 at 8:56
29

Whatever you do, make sure you normalize the data before you start trying to strip tags. I recently attended a web app security workshop that covered XSS filter evasion. One would normally think that searching for < or &lt; or its hex equivalent would be sufficient. I was blown away after seeing a slide with 70 ways that < can be encoded to beat filters.

Update:

Below is the presentation I was referring to, see slide 26 for the 70 ways to encode <.

Filter Evasion: Houdini on the Wire

  • Could you please add a link to that slide? I believe not so many encoding methods are valid for browser... – dma_k Aug 20 '11 at 9:48
  • good read. . thanks for sharing – Jianhong Jul 26 '13 at 2:04
  • correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the first item on this list the only one that'll actually be interpreted by a browser as starting an HTML tag? The rest will either be displayed as is or shown as a literal '<' in the resulting document, surely? If so, what exactly is the point of this list? – Jules Jan 25 '14 at 5:01
11

There may be some, but the most robust thing is to use an actual HTML parser. There's one here, and if it's reasonably well formed, you can also use SAX or another XML parser.

  • Of course, if what you're looking to get out in the end is a string that is guaranteed safe to include in HTML output, an HTML parser is not what you want, otherwise the string '&lt;script&gt;alert("hello");' would be come through the parser and end up being dangerous even though it wasn't to start with... – Jules Jan 25 '14 at 5:08
  • 2
    Perhaps if you could stop being condescending it would be more useful. I'm quite familiar with HTML parsers, and have used many over the past 20 years. Typically, the output of an HTML parser would be a DOM or something similar, but the question clearly asked for a string, so I'm assuming your suggestion would be to use the W3C DOM property textContent of the resulting parsed DOM, or some equivalent if using a parser whose output is not a DOM. If this is what you're recommending, this is dangerous because it will allow through HTML content if it is encoded in the source document as entities. – Jules Jan 25 '14 at 8:02
  • Perhaps. Perhaps not. But if you are that unclear on the concept of "parser" I wouldn't bet on it. – Charlie Martin Jan 25 '14 at 17:01
  • @Jules, '&lt;script&gt;alert("hello");' would go through a parser and come out the other end as a text node with the text contents '<script>alert("hello");'. That's safe. If you wished to serialize that DOM node back to an HTML document, then the text would be encoded, most likely as '&lt;script&gt;alert("hello");' Encoding is notoriously difficult for humans to keep straight. – AndrewF Sep 21 '15 at 21:17
11

After having this question open for almost a week, I can say with some certainty that there is no method available in the Java API or Apache libaries which strips HTML tags from a String. You would either have to use an HTML parser as described in the previous answers, or write a simple regular expression to strip out the tags.

  • Um, what do you imagine would do such a thing, if not an HTML parser? Or, for that matter, what do you imagine you're doing with a regular expression? – Charlie Martin Jan 25 '14 at 5:33
  • What I imagine he's doing with a regular expression is the same thing that I'm doing with a regular expression: removing anything from a string that looks as though it might be an HTML tag in order to ensure the resulting string is both (1) human readable and (2) does not cause an XSS vulnerability if embedded in a web page. – Jules Jan 25 '14 at 8:10
7

When using Jsoup it's even easier than described in above answers:

String html = "bla <b>hehe</b> <br> this is awesome simple";

String text = Jsoup.parse(html).text();
  • This worked for me and seemed to pose no problems to do with Jsoup conversion of spaces to newlines (TextNode containing only space) or newlines to spaces (normal Jsoup behaviour), which did seem to be problems with new HtmlToPlainText().getPlainText( Jsoup.parse( htmlHitLine )); – mike rodent Feb 21 '17 at 20:57
  • Great to hear that:)) – George Garchagudashvili Feb 22 '17 at 5:01
6

I've used nekoHtml to do that. It can strip all tags but it can just as easily keep or strip a subset of tags.

5

I know that this question is quite old, but I have been looking for this too and it seems that it is still not easy to find a good and easy solution in java.

Today I came across this little functions lib. It actually attempts to imitate the php strip_tags function.

http://jmelo.lyncode.com/java-strip_tags-php-function/

It works like this (copied from their site):

    import static com.lyncode.jtwig.functions.util.HtmlUtils.stripTags;

    public class StripTagsExample {
      public static void main(String... args) {
        String result = stripTags("<!-- <a href='test'></a>--><a>Test</a>", "");
        // Produced result: Test
      }
    }
3

Hi I know this thread is old but it still came out tops on Google, and I was looking for a quick fix to the same problem. Couldn't find anything useful so I came up with this code snippet -- hope it helps someone. It just loops over the string and skips all the tags. Plain & simple.

boolean intag = false;
String inp = "<H1>Some <b>HTML</b> <span style=blablabla>text</span>";
String outp = "";

for (int i=0; i < inp.length(); ++i)
{
    if (!intag && inp.charAt(i) == '<')
        {
            intag = true;
            continue;
        }
        if (intag && inp.charAt(i) == '>')
        {
            intag = false;
            continue;
        }
        if (!intag)
        {
            outp = outp + inp.charAt(i);
        }
}   
return outp;
  • You might consider using StringBuilder for your output. How would you handle malformed HTML? What if my HTML contains unescaped less-than or greater-than characters? – allingeek Sep 27 '12 at 6:38
3

With pure iterative approach and no regex :

public String stripTags(final String html) {

    final StringBuilder sbText = new StringBuilder(1000);
    final StringBuilder sbHtml = new StringBuilder(1000);

    boolean isText = true;

    for (char ch : html.toCharArray()) {
        if (isText) { // outside html
            if (ch != '<') {
                sbText.append(ch);
                continue;
            } else {   // switch mode             
                isText = false;      
                sbHtml.append(ch); 
                continue;
            }
        }else { // inside html
            if (ch != '>') {
                sbHtml.append(ch);
                continue;
            } else {      // switch mode    
                isText = true;     
                sbHtml.append(ch); 
                continue;
            }
        }
    }

    return sbText.toString();
}
1

Because of abbreviation (string truncation) of html fragment, I had also the problem of unclosed html tags that regex can't detect. Eg:

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, <b>consectetur</b> adipiscing elit. <a href="abc"

So, referring to the 2 best answers (JSoup and regex), I preferred solution using JSoup:

Jsoup.parse(html).text()
0

Wicket uses the following method to escape html, located in: org.apache.wicket.util.string.Strings

public static CharSequence escapeMarkup(final String s, final boolean escapeSpaces,
    final boolean convertToHtmlUnicodeEscapes)
{
    if (s == null)
    {
        return null;
    }
    else
    {
        int len = s.length();
        final AppendingStringBuffer buffer = new AppendingStringBuffer((int)(len * 1.1));

        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++)
        {
            final char c = s.charAt(i);

            switch (c)
            {
                case '\t' :
                    if (escapeSpaces)
                    {
                        // Assumption is four space tabs (sorry, but that's
                        // just how it is!)
                        buffer.append("&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;");
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        buffer.append(c);
                    }
                    break;

                case ' ' :
                    if (escapeSpaces)
                    {
                        buffer.append("&nbsp;");
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        buffer.append(c);
                    }
                    break;

                case '<' :
                    buffer.append("&lt;");
                    break;

                case '>' :
                    buffer.append("&gt;");
                    break;

                case '&' :

                    buffer.append("&amp;");
                    break;

                case '"' :
                    buffer.append("&quot;");
                    break;

                case '\'' :
                    buffer.append("&#039;");
                    break;

                default :

                    if (convertToHtmlUnicodeEscapes)
                    {
                        int ci = 0xffff & c;
                        if (ci < 160)
                        {
                            // nothing special only 7 Bit
                            buffer.append(c);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            // Not 7 Bit use the unicode system
                            buffer.append("&#");
                            buffer.append(new Integer(ci).toString());
                            buffer.append(';');
                        }
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        buffer.append(c);
                    }

                    break;
            }
        }

        return buffer;
    }
}
  • 2
    This is escaping, not stripping – gregers Jan 24 '11 at 13:24
  • Exactly, there is a difference between those two! – Rihards Jun 24 '11 at 19:23
0
public static String stripTags(String str) {
    int startPosition = str.indexOf('<');
    int endPosition;
    while (startPosition != -1) {
        endPosition = str.indexOf('>', startPosition);
        str = str.substring(0, startPosition) + (endPosition != -1 ? str.substring(endPosition + 1) : "");
        startPosition = str.indexOf('<');
    }
    return str;
}

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