25

I want to create a ListView that has two columns with a fixed width and a third column to fill in the remaining space. So something like this:

<ListView>
    <ListView.View>
        <GridView>
            <GridViewColumn Header="Name" Width="*" />
            <GridViewColumn Header="Age" Width="50" />
            <GridViewColumn Header="Gender" Width="50" />
        </GridView>
    </ListView.View>
</ListView>

The problem is I can't find a way to get the Name column to fill in the remaining space, as setting the width to * doesn't work. It looks like there is a way to do this with a value converter, but it seems like there should be a simpler way. Like with a DataGrid control, you can specify the widths of columns with *s.

7

The issue is the column width of a GridViewColumn is double, rather than a GridLength object, and there is no conversion in place to handle the *. Not sure if this is an oversight by the WPF team or not. You would think it should be supported.

Aside from the converter, the only other way I've seen it done is here: http://www.ontheblog.net/CMS/Default.aspx?tabid=36&EntryID=37.

Both are additional work that should not be required. I have found other "weird" things with the ListView and GridView combo so I quit using them. If I need a datagrid I use the 3rd party one we license, if I need a complex ListBox style menu, I just use a templated ListBox.

  • Ah, the width is a double rather than a GridLength object. It would be interesting to know if this is indeed just an oversight or if there is some rationale behind this. Oh well, it looks like the simplest solution for my scenario is to just use a DataGrid. – JChristian Nov 30 '11 at 20:46
39

I was trying to achieve the same thing but then decided I would like my ListView columns to consume a percentage of the ListView instead, the result of this is all columns consuming a portion of space and all space being consumed in the ListView. You could set this up to have whatever percentage you like on the last column to directly achieve your 'fill remaining space on last column' goal.

I find this method fairly robust and reliable (even on resize!) so thought I might share.

I have four columns in my ListView for this example. All you need is to register the SizeChanged event in your ListView with the below event handler:

private void ProductsListView_SizeChanged(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e)
{
    ListView listView = sender as ListView;
    GridView gView = listView.View as GridView;

    var workingWidth = listView.ActualWidth - SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth; // take into account vertical scrollbar
    var col1 = 0.50;
    var col2 = 0.20;
    var col3 = 0.15;
    var col4 = 0.15;

    gView.Columns[0].Width = workingWidth*col1;
    gView.Columns[1].Width = workingWidth*col2;
    gView.Columns[2].Width = workingWidth*col3;
    gView.Columns[3].Width = workingWidth*col4;
}
  • 12
    I suggest using SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth instead of hard-coded 35. Some users (like me) customize their scrollbar width. Mines are probably 70 or so :) +1 for a good answer anyhow – Konrad Morawski Aug 9 '12 at 9:30
  • 1
    You'd get extra points if you created some sort of child GridView and columns so you could apply this to all GridViews instead of a custom implementation for each view. – JRadness May 15 '13 at 20:53
  • Thanks. Simple and easy way to modify the columns. – Wolf5 Mar 3 '16 at 12:08
  • @KonradMorawski nice tip, but in my environment is SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth = 17 and I need use something around 25. When i use 17 VerticalScrollBar is visible. – honzakuzel1989 Sep 22 '16 at 9:55
  • @honzakuzel1989 true, SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth is only the default and not the current width - I have to take the custom width of the style instead. – Nicolas Jan 9 at 17:19
14

Came across this when looking into a similar problem, my issue was I wanted all columns to be 'Auto' expect the first, which would just fill in the extra space, so I expanded on GONeale's solution.

private void ListView_SizeChanged(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e)
{
    ListView _ListView = sender as ListView;
    GridView _GridView = _ListView.View as GridView;
    var _ActualWidth = _ListView.ActualWidth - SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth;
    for (Int32 i = 1; i < _GridView.Columns.Count; i++)
    {
        _ActualWidth = _ActualWidth - _GridView.Columns[i].ActualWidth;
    }
    _GridView.Columns[0].Width = _ActualWidth;
}

Then the XAML is simply:

...
<ListView.View>
    <GridView>
        <GridViewColumn Header="Title" />
        <GridViewColumn Header="Artist" Width="Auto" />
        <GridViewColumn Header="Album" Width="Auto" />
        <GridViewColumn Header="Genre" Width="Auto" />
    </GridView>
</ListView.View>
...

This code could also be used on more generically as number of columns isn't hard-coded and with a little tweaking you could probably make the 'fill column' definable through some sort of logic.

Hope it helps someone :)

  • It did, right after I changed the number of columns in my GridView and broke the hard-coded number of columns. I modified this approach to cater for that (I fixed the width of the first column). Thanks. – CAD bloke Feb 5 '15 at 1:25
1

My need was to have all columns with the same width. The above solutions are fine, but I prefer to wrap such a thing in an attached property (MVVM, reusability, etc.). Here is my code, if it can help.

    public class StarSizeHelper {

    private static readonly List<FrameworkElement> s_knownElements = new List<FrameworkElement>();

    public static bool GetIsEnabled(DependencyObject d) {
        return (bool) d.GetValue(IsEnabledProperty);
    }

    public static void SetIsEnabled(ListView d, bool value) {
        d.SetValue(IsEnabledProperty, value);
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty IsEnabledProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("IsEnabled", 
                                            typeof(bool), 
                                            typeof(StarSizeHelper),
                                            new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(IsEnabledChanged));

    public static void IsEnabledChanged(DependencyObject d, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e) {

        var ctl = d as ListView;
        if (ctl == null) {
            throw new Exception("IsEnabled attached property only works on a ListView type");
        }

        RememberElement(ctl);
    }

    private static void RememberElement(ListView ctl) {

        if (! s_knownElements.Contains(ctl)) {
            s_knownElements.Add(ctl);

            RegisterEvents(ctl);
        } 
        // nothing to do if elt is known
    }

    private static void OnUnloaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) {

        FrameworkElement ctl = (FrameworkElement) sender;
        ForgetControl(ctl);
    }

    private static void ForgetControl(FrameworkElement fe) {

        s_knownElements.Remove(fe);
        UnregisterEvents(fe);
    }

    private static void RegisterEvents(FrameworkElement fe) {
        fe.Unloaded += OnUnloaded;
        fe.SizeChanged += OnSizeChanged;
    }

    private static void UnregisterEvents(FrameworkElement fe) {
        fe.Unloaded -= OnUnloaded;
        fe.SizeChanged -= OnSizeChanged;
    }

    private static void OnSizeChanged(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e) {

        ListView listView = sender as ListView;
        if (listView == null) {
            return; // should not happen
        }
        GridView gView = listView.View as GridView;
        if (gView == null) {
            return; // should not happen
        }

        var workingWidth = listView.ActualWidth - SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth -10; // take into account vertical scrollbar
        var colWidth = workingWidth / gView.Columns.Count;
        foreach (GridViewColumn column in gView.Columns) {
            column.Width = colWidth;
        }
    }
}

In order to use it:

<ListView ... StarSizeHelper.IsEnabled="true" ... />

(you still to fix the namespace declaration in the XAML, of course)

You can adapt your sizing needs in the OnSizeChanged method.

1

The solution from David Hanson-Greville's OnTheBlog mentioned in one of the first answers isn't available anymore, even though the blog still exists. I was able to find it on the Wayback Machine and with a few moderations, here it is:

The trick is that you set Stretch=true on your ListView and it will stretch the columns that do not have a width equally.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;

namespace Demo.Extension.Properties
{
    ///
    /// ListViewColumnStretch
    ///
    public class ListViewColumns : DependencyObject
    {
        ///
        /// IsStretched Dependancy property which can be attached to gridview columns.
        ///
        public static readonly DependencyProperty StretchProperty =
            DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("Stretch",
            typeof(bool),
            typeof(ListViewColumns),
            new UIPropertyMetadata(true, null, OnCoerceStretch));

        ///
        /// Gets the stretch.
        ///
        /// The obj.
        ///
        public static bool GetStretch(DependencyObject obj)
        {
            return (bool)obj.GetValue(StretchProperty);
        }

        ///
        /// Sets the stretch.
        ///
        /// The obj.
        /// if set to true [value].
        public static void SetStretch(DependencyObject obj, bool value)
        {
            obj.SetValue(StretchProperty, value);
        }

        ///
        /// Called when [coerce stretch].
        ///
        ///If this callback seems unfamilar then please read
        /// the great blog post by Paul Jackson found here.
        /// http://compilewith.net/2007/08/wpf-dependency-properties.html
        /// The source.
        /// The value.
        ///
        public static object OnCoerceStretch(DependencyObject source, object value)
        {
            ListView lv = (source as ListView);

            //Ensure we dont have an invalid dependancy object of type ListView.
            if (lv == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("This property may only be used on ListViews");
            }

            //Setup our event handlers for this list view.
            lv.Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(lv_Loaded);
            lv.SizeChanged += new SizeChangedEventHandler(lv_SizeChanged);
            return value;
        }

        ///
        /// Handles the SizeChanged event of the lv control.
        ///
        /// The source of the event.
        /// The instance containing the event data.
        private static void lv_SizeChanged(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            ListView lv = (sender as ListView);
            if (lv.IsLoaded)
            {
                //Set our initial widths.
                SetColumnWidths(lv);
            }
        }

        ///
        /// Handles the Loaded event of the lv control.
        ///
        /// The source of the event.
        /// The instance containing the event data.
        private static void lv_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            ListView lv = (sender as ListView);
            //Set our initial widths.
            SetColumnWidths(lv);
        }

        ///
        /// Sets the column widths.
        ///
        private static void SetColumnWidths(ListView listView)
        {
            //Pull the stretch columns fromt the tag property.
            List<GridViewColumn> columns = (listView.Tag as List<GridViewColumn>);
            double specifiedWidth = 0;
            GridView gridView = listView.View as GridView;
            if (gridView != null)
            {
                if (columns == null)
                {
                    //Instance if its our first run.
                    columns = new List<GridViewColumn>();
                    // Get all columns with no width having been set.
                    foreach (GridViewColumn column in gridView.Columns)
                    {
                        if (!(column.Width >= 0))
                        {
                            columns.Add(column);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            specifiedWidth += column.ActualWidth;
                        }
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    // Get all columns with no width having been set.
                    foreach (GridViewColumn column in gridView.Columns)
                    {
                        if (!columns.Contains(column))
                        {
                            specifiedWidth += column.ActualWidth;
                        }
                    }
                }

                // Allocate remaining space equally.
                foreach (GridViewColumn column in columns)
                {
                    double newWidth = (listView.ActualWidth - specifiedWidth) / columns.Count;
                    if (newWidth >= 10)
                    {
                        column.Width = newWidth - 10;
                    }
                }

                //Store the columns in the TAG property for later use.
                listView.Tag = columns;
            }
        }
    }
}

The you just add the namespace to the XAML file

xmlns:Extensions="clr-namespace:Demo.Extension.Properties"

and use it on your list view:

<ListView ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Items}" DisplayMemberPath="Name"
                          ScrollViewer.VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Auto"
                          Grid.Column="0" Margin="8" Extensions:ListViewColumns.Stretch="true">
0

My problem was similar but I wanted to fix the width of the first column and I also didn't want it to break if I added or removed columns, even at runtime. Thanks @Gary for the tip at https://stackoverflow.com/a/14674830/492

private void ResultsListView_SizeChanged(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e)
    {
      double newWidthForColumnsExceptFirstColumn = ResultsListView.ActualWidth - SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth - ResultsGridView.Columns[0].Width;
      int columnsCount = ResultsGridView.Columns.Count;
      Double newColumnWidth = newWidthForColumnsExceptFirstColumn / (columnsCount -1);

      for ( int col = 1; col < columnsCount; col++ ) // skip column [0]
      {
        ResultsGridView.Columns[col].Width = newColumnWidth;
      }
    }
0

Here is a solution that allows one to have multiple ListViews leverage a general "Resize" event handler.

    //Using dictionarys as trackers allows us to have multiple ListViews use the same code
    private Dictionary<string, double> _fixedWidthTracker = new Dictionary<string, double>();
    private Dictionary<string, List<GridViewColumn>> _varWidthColTracker = new Dictionary<string, List<GridViewColumn>>();
    private void ListView_SizeChanged(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        ListView lv = sender as ListView;
        if (lv != null)
        {
            //For validation during Debug
            VerifyName(lv);

            GridView gv = lv.View as GridView;
            if (gv != null)
            {
                if (!_varWidthColTracker.ContainsKey(lv.Name))
                {
                    _varWidthColTracker[lv.Name] = new List<GridViewColumn>();
                    _fixedWidthTracker[lv.Name] = 0;
                    foreach (GridViewColumn gvc in gv.Columns)
                    {
                        if (!double.IsNaN(gvc.Width)) _fixedWidthTracker[lv.Name] += gvc.Width; else _varWidthColTracker[lv.Name].Add(gvc);
                    }
                }
                double newWidthForColumns = e.NewSize.Width - SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth - _fixedWidthTracker[lv.Name];
                int columnsCount = gv.Columns.Count;
                int numberOfFixedWithColumns = columnsCount - _varWidthColTracker[lv.Name].Count;
                Double newColumnWidth = newWidthForColumns / (columnsCount - numberOfFixedWithColumns);

                foreach (GridViewColumn gvc in _varWidthColTracker[lv.Name])
                {
                    gvc.Width = newColumnWidth;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Warns the developer if this object does not have
    /// a public property with the specified name. This 
    /// method does not exist in a Release build.
    /// </summary>
    [Conditional("DEBUG")]
    [DebuggerStepThrough]
    public void VerifyName(ListView listView)
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(listView.Name))
        {
            string msg = "The Name attribute is required to be set on the ListView in order to Bind to this method";
            Debug.Fail(msg);
        }
    }
0

I took the example above (which is great) and improved it slightly to prevent runtime exceptions on resize:

private void tpList_SizeChanged(object sender, SizeChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            ListView listView = sender as ListView;
            GridView gView = listView.View as GridView;

            var workingWidth = listView.ActualWidth - (SystemParameters.VerticalScrollBarWidth + 20); // take into account vertical scrollbar
            var col1 = 0.50;
            var col2 = 0.50;

            var t1 = workingWidth * col1;
            var t2 = workingWidth * col2;
            gView.Columns[0].Width = t1 > 0 ? t1 : 1;
            gView.Columns[1].Width = t2 > 0 ? t2 : 1;

        }
    }

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