54

How do I read a .man file that's not on my manpath? I know I had a command for this, but now I don't remember, and I can't find the right switch in the man pages for man.

54

You can try to read your file by doing

man path_to_file

as man will treat the given argument as a file if it finds a slash / in it. For instance

man ./my_test

will open the my_test file, while

man my_test

will look in the standard manual for the given command.

  • Ah, there we go! Strange, I thought I had tried that already... – Nagel Dec 1 '11 at 14:53
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    After an update (man is now v 1.6f), this doesn't work anymore. I guess it's back to nroff. Annoying, I liked this solution so much better :( – Nagel Apr 27 '12 at 22:41
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    You can try to read your file by doing man path_to_file, as man will treat the given argument as a file if it finds a slash / in it. For instance man ./my_test will open the my_test file, while man my_test will look in the standard manual for the given command. – AlQafir Apr 29 '12 at 13:55
  • @Nagel I forgot to tag you in the last comment, hope it helps – AlQafir May 1 '12 at 7:36
  • Awesome, @IceCoder! I can't believe I didn't try that before :P Thank you so much :D – Nagel May 1 '12 at 14:30
13

If your man page is in a non-standard directory location, you can use:

man -M <path to man directory> mymanpage

You can also use the MANPATH environment variable:

MANPATH=<path to man directory> man mymanpage

If you are looking to format a standalone man page, use nroff:

nroff -man mymanpage.1
  • Can't get man -M to work. man -M qnstrn.man gives me What manual page do you want?. man -M qnstrn.man qnstrn gives me No manual entry for qnstrn. nroff works, though. – Nagel Dec 1 '11 at 3:03
  • Ok, I edited the answer to distinguish between a non-standard directory and the case of a standalone page. – David K. Hess Dec 1 '11 at 3:08
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    To complete the last: nroff -man mymanpage.1 | pager (on Debian) or nroff -man mymanpage.1 | less (on all Unicies). – Hibou57 Jul 13 '14 at 19:45

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