33

I want to get line number of code which cause error. For example;

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(bagcum))
    {
        SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand();
        cmd.CommandText = "DONTINSERT into GIVEMEERROR(CamNo,Statu) values (" + 23 + "," + 0 + ")";
        conn.Open();
        int n = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}

so As we know that code doesn't work, it will throw exception Line number of code which is:

int n = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

So how can get that line number of using try-catch? I tried using a StackTrace class but it gives line number as 0:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    try
    {
        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(bagcum))
        {
            SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand();
            cmd.CommandText = "DONTINSERT into GIVEMEERROR(CamNo,Statu) values (" + 23 + "," + 0 + ")";
            conn.Open();
            int n = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
        }        
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.StackTrace trace = new System.Diagnostics.StackTrace(ex, true);            
        Console.WriteLine("Line: " + trace.GetFrame(0).GetFileLineNumber());
    }
}

OUTPUT:

Line:0

Update:
Usually error line of code is 22 so I have to get that number.

Thanks

3
  • If you're in RELEASE mode, the line number (amongst other) is not any more in the stacktrace. The easiest way in to compile in DEBUG mode. If it is still not working, check if you have full Debug info in the project properties\Advanced\Debug Info. – JiBéDoublevé Dec 1 '11 at 10:00
  • @JiBéDoublevé it is in Debug mode, and it s full Debug – Mustafa Ekici Dec 1 '11 at 11:53
  • 1
    Are your .pdb files in the same directory as all the other files? – JiBéDoublevé Dec 1 '11 at 12:08

10 Answers 10

24

Try this simple hack instead:

First Add this (extension) class to your namespace(most be toplevel class):

public static class ExceptionHelper
{
    public static int LineNumber(this Exception e)
    {

        int linenum = 0;
        try
        {
            //linenum = Convert.ToInt32(e.StackTrace.Substring(e.StackTrace.LastIndexOf(":line") + 5));

            //For Localized Visual Studio ... In other languages stack trace  doesn't end with ":Line 12"
            linenum = Convert.ToInt32(e.StackTrace.Substring(e.StackTrace.LastIndexOf(' ')));

        }


        catch
        {
            //Stack trace is not available!
        }
        return linenum;
    }
}

And its done!Use LineNumber method whenever you need it:

try
{
//Do your code here
}
catch (Exception e)
{
int linenum = e.LineNumber();
}
1
  • I have this problem too. and return 0 by question code. and get 'e)' by your code :( I manage exceptions in one parent class. can you help me please. – morteza ataiy Sep 6 '18 at 11:57
11

try this

To get the line numbers in the StackTrace, you need to have the correct debug information (PDB files) alongside your dlls/exes. To generate the the debug information, set the option in Project Properties -> Build -> Advanced -> Debug Info:

alt text

Setting it to full should suffice (see the MSDN docs for what the other options do). Debug info (ie. PDB files) are generated for Debug build configurations by default, but can also be generated for Release build configurations.

Generating PDBs for release builds enables you to ship you code without the PDBs, but to drop the PDBs next to the dlls if you need line numbers (or even to attach a remote debugger). One thing to note is that in a release build, the line numbers may not be entirely correct due to optimisations made by the compiler or the JIT compiler (this is especially so if the line numbers show as 0).

0
8

The problem is that you're trying to get the line number of the first frame of the exception:

System.Diagnostics.StackTrace trace = new System.Diagnostics.StackTrace(ex, true);
Console.WriteLine("Line: " + trace.GetFrame(0).GetFileLineNumber());

However, the exception does not originate in the line you write ExecuteNonQuery, but somewhere within that function, possibly multiple stack frames (i.e. nested function calls) deeper. So the first frame (which you explicitly retrieve using GetFrame(0)) is somewhere inside Microsoft's code (most likely System.Data.dll) for which you don't have any debugging symbols.

Write out the complete exception stacktrace in your function to see what I mean:

try
{
   // your code ...
}
catch (Exception ex) 
{
   Console.WriteLine(ex);
}

Short of parsing the stacktrace (i.e. ex.StackTrace) there is no reliable why to get the linenumber of the "ExecuteNonQuery()" invocation. I would especially not try to count the stackframes up the stack where your call to ExecuteNonQuery() happens.

I wonder however, what you need the sole linenumber for, why not just log/print/whatever the complete stacktrace instead. At least for diagnostics reasons that is much more useful anyway.

0
6

You might get 0 in result if you don't initialize StackTrace to include fileinfo.

enter image description here

Try this

try
{
    //code
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    var lineNumber = new System.Diagnostics.StackTrace(e, true).GetFrame(0).GetFileLineNumber();
}

This worked for me.

4

You can use the System.Diagnostics.StackTrace class as below:

public void MethodName()
{
    try
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        // Get stack trace for the exception with source file information
        var trace = new StackTrace(ex, true);

        // Get the top stack frame
        var frame = trace.GetFrame(0);

        // Get the line number from the stack frame
        var line = frame.GetFileLineNumber();
    }
}
0
4

Here's a rather easy way to get a bunch of info from the Exception object: Just add code like this to any potentially exception-throwing methods:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    String exDetail = String.Format(ExceptionFormatString, ex.Message, Environment.NewLine, ex.Source, ex.StackTrace);
    MessageBox.Show(exDetail);
}

The information you get will often be more specific, especially as regards line numbers of where problems are occurring, than you would otherwise see.

You may have noted that the String.Format() uses a constant, namely "ExceptionFormatString". This is a good practice, so that if you want to change it, after adding the above code to 40-eleven methods, you can just change it one place. Anyway, here it is:

public static readonly String ExceptionFormatString = "Exception message: {0}{1}Exception Source: {2}{1}Exception StackTrace: {3}{1}";

Happy Debugging!

0
1

To get line numbers, you need your application to be in Debug mode or include the debug symbols in the same folder (the .pdb file) for line numbers to appear. You code as posted should then work.

1

the following code exception log handler method is works fine :

in catch :

 catch (Exception ex)
            {
                CommonTools.vAddToLog(ex, EmpID, ErrorCodes.UnDefined);
                Response.Redirect("~/ErrorPage.aspx");
            }

in AddToLog method :

 string _exMsgErr = string.Empty;
                var frame = oStackTrace.FrameCount > 1 ? oStackTrace.GetFrame(1) : oStackTrace.GetFrame(0);
                if (oException.GetType() == typeof(JOVALException))
                {
                    JOVALException _JOVALEx = (JOVALException)oException;
                    _exMsgErr = _JOVALEx.Message;
                }
                else
                {
                    _exMsgErr = oException.Message;
                }
                ErrorLog oError = new ErrorLog(frame.GetMethod().Name, (string)frame.GetFileName(), (int)frame.GetFileLineNumber(), sCustomErrorMessage == string.Empty ? _exMsgErr : sCustomErrorMessage, sUserID, oErrCode);
                //Cont. your code of log file

Finally the xml log file looks like this :

<ErrorLog>
<MethodName>FillRolesDDLs</MethodName>
<FileName>
F:\Projects\ERP\ERP\Pages\SystemSettings\Roles.aspx.cs
</FileName>
<LineNumber>61</LineNumber>
<ErrorMesssage>
The given DataRow is not in the current DataRowCollection.
</ErrorMesssage>
<UserID>1</UserID>
<ErrCode>UnDefined</ErrCode>
<Time>15/03/2015 16:23:21.976</Time>
</ErrorLog>
0

In .NET 4.5 you can use the ExceptionDispatchInfo to rethrow your exceptions instead of the classic throw;(make sure the PDB files are there or no line numbers will be displayed):

    static void A()
    {
        try
        {
            throw new Exception("A");
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            ExceptionDispatchInfo.Capture(e).Throw();
        }
    }

Source: blogpost. PDB files don't decrease performance on Windows.

-1

Copy the entire stack trace in to a string or stringbuilder by using try/catch that can throw, see the below example

try
{
    //Do some programming
}
catch(Exception ex)
{

   //Catch the exception and assign the stack trace
   StackTrace = ex;
}

The output will be

System.IndexOutOfRangeException: Index was outside the bounds of the array.   
at Program.Run() in C:\Console Application1\Program.cs:line 37    
at Program.Main(String[] args) in C:\Console Application1\Program.cs:line 45 

The first line shows the type of the exception and the message. The second line shows the file, function and line number where the exception was thrown

2
  • well this seems to be a solution but i m asking without parsing any output – Mustafa Ekici Dec 1 '11 at 11:58
  • Not enough code, I cannot get StackTrace = ex; to work. -1 for non working example. – Omzig Apr 9 '14 at 19:59

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