How can I write two functions that would take a string and return if it starts with the specified character/string or ends with it?

For example:

$str = '|apples}';

echo startsWith($str, '|'); //Returns true
echo endsWith($str, '}'); //Returns true

30 Answers 30

up vote 1360 down vote accepted
function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
     $length = strlen($needle);
     return (substr($haystack, 0, $length) === $needle);
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    $length = strlen($needle);
    if ($length == 0) {
        return true;
    }

    return (substr($haystack, -$length) === $needle);
}

Use this if you don't want to use a regex.

  • 14
    +1 This is cleaner than the accepted answer. Also, $length is not needed in the last line of the endsWith(). – too much php Sep 17 '09 at 2:57
  • 11
    I'd say endsWith('foo', '') == false is the correct behavior. Because foo doesn't end with nothing. 'Foo' ends with 'o', 'oo' and 'Foo'. – MrHus Apr 13 '12 at 13:34
  • 97
    EndsWith can be written a lot shorter: return substr($haystack, -strlen($needle))===$needle; – Rok Kralj Jun 11 '12 at 9:57
  • 8
    You can avoid the if altogether by passing $length as the third parameter to substr: return (substr($haystack, -$length, $length);. This handles the case of $length == 0 by returning an empty string and not the whole $haystack. – mxk Jan 23 '15 at 1:21
  • 9
    @MrHus I would recommend using multi-byte safe functions, e.g. mb_strlen and mb_substr – 19Gerhard85 Apr 25 '16 at 8:49

It is possible to use strrpos and strpos to check start-with and ends-with respectively.

Note that using strrpos to check starts with and strpos to check ends with will return as soon as possible instead of checking the whole string till the end. Also, this solution does not create a temporary string. Consider explaining the reason before downvoting. Just because a f-wit at the DWTF doesn't understand how this function works or thinks there is only one solution doesn't mean this answer is wrong.

function startsWith($haystack, $needle) {
    // search backwards starting from haystack length characters from the end
    return $needle === ''
      || strrpos($haystack, $needle, -strlen($haystack)) !== false;
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle) {
    // search forward starting from end minus needle length characters
    if ($needle === '') {
        return true;
    }
    $diff = \strlen($haystack) - \strlen($needle);
    return $diff >= 0 && strpos($haystack, $needle, $diff) !== false;
}

Tests and results (compare with this):

startsWith('abcdef', 'ab') -> true
startsWith('abcdef', 'cd') -> false
startsWith('abcdef', 'ef') -> false
startsWith('abcdef', '') -> true
startsWith('', 'abcdef') -> false

endsWith('abcdef', 'ab') -> false
endsWith('abcdef', 'cd') -> false
endsWith('abcdef', 'ef') -> true
endsWith('abcdef', '') -> true
endsWith('', 'abcdef') -> false

Note: the strncmp and substr_compare functions will outperform this function.

  • 64
    This answer made it to the Daily WTF! :D See thedailywtf.com/articles/… – Wim ten Brink Apr 21 '16 at 11:36
  • Please note that @DavidWallace and @FrancescoMM comments apply to an older version of this answer. The current answer uses strrpos which (should) fail immediately if needle does not match the beginning of haystack. – Salman A Apr 21 '16 at 14:00
  • 2
    I don't get it. Based on php.net/manual/en/function.strrpos.php: "If the value is negative, search will instead start from that many characters from the end of the string, searching backwards." This seems to indicate that we're starting at character 0 (due to -strlength($haystack)) and searching backward from there? Doesn't that mean you're not searching anything? I also don't understand the !== false parts of this. I'm guessing this is relying on a quirk of PHP where some values are "truthy" and others "falsy" but how does that work in this case? – Welbog Apr 21 '16 at 14:44
  • 3
    @Welbog: for example haystack = xxxyyy needle = yyy and using strrpos the search starts from the first x. Now we do not have a successful match here (found x instead of y) and we cannot go backward anymore (we're at start of string) the search fails immediately. About using !== false -- strrpos in the above example will return 0 or false and not other value. Likewise, strpos in the above example can return $temp (the expected position) or false. I went with !== false for consistency but you could use === 0 and === $temp in the functions respectively. – Salman A Apr 21 '16 at 15:01
  • 6
    @spoo it has already been established that strpos === 0 is a terrible solution if haystack is large and needle does not exist. – Salman A Oct 8 '16 at 6:22

Updated 23-Aug-2016

Functions

function substr_startswith($haystack, $needle) {
    return substr($haystack, 0, strlen($needle)) === $needle;
}

function preg_match_startswith($haystack, $needle) {
    return preg_match('~' . preg_quote($needle, '~') . '~A', $haystack) > 0;
}

function substr_compare_startswith($haystack, $needle) {
    return substr_compare($haystack, $needle, 0, strlen($needle)) === 0;
}

function strpos_startswith($haystack, $needle) {
    return strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0;
}

function strncmp_startswith($haystack, $needle) {
    return strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0;
}

function strncmp_startswith2($haystack, $needle) {
    return $haystack[0] === $needle[0]
        ? strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0
        : false;
}

Tests

echo 'generating tests';
for($i = 0; $i < 100000; ++$i) {
    if($i % 2500 === 0) echo '.';
    $test_cases[] = [
        random_bytes(random_int(1, 7000)),
        random_bytes(random_int(1, 3000)),
    ];
}
echo "done!\n";


$functions = ['substr_startswith', 'preg_match_startswith', 'substr_compare_startswith', 'strpos_startswith', 'strncmp_startswith', 'strncmp_startswith2'];
$results = [];

foreach($functions as $func) {
    $start = microtime(true);
    foreach($test_cases as $tc) {
        $func(...$tc);
    }
    $results[$func] = (microtime(true) - $start) * 1000;
}

asort($results);

foreach($results as $func => $time) {
    echo "$func: " . number_format($time, 1) . " ms\n";
}

Results (PHP 7.0.9)

(Sorted fastest to slowest)

strncmp_startswith2: 40.2 ms
strncmp_startswith: 42.9 ms
substr_compare_startswith: 44.5 ms
substr_startswith: 48.4 ms
strpos_startswith: 138.7 ms
preg_match_startswith: 13,152.4 ms

Results (PHP 5.3.29)

(Sorted fastest to slowest)

strncmp_startswith2: 477.9 ms
strpos_startswith: 522.1 ms
strncmp_startswith: 617.1 ms
substr_compare_startswith: 706.7 ms
substr_startswith: 756.8 ms
preg_match_startswith: 10,200.0 ms

startswith_benchmark.php

  • 3
    If the strings are not empty, as in your tests, this is actually somehow (20-30%) faster: function startswith5b($haystack, $needle) {return ($haystack{0}==$needle{0})?strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0:FALSE;} I added a reply below. – FrancescoMM Jul 28 '13 at 15:38
  • 3
    @Jronny Because 110 is less than 133...?? – mpen Dec 2 '14 at 16:41
  • 2
    Darn, I don't know what went to my head that time. Prolly the lack of sleep. – Jronny Dec 18 '14 at 3:08
  • 1
    @mpen, I noticed not the elephant at all :( – Visman Nov 21 '17 at 2:15
  • 1
    $haystack[0] will throw a notice error if you don't test it with isset. The same for needles. But if you add tests, it will slow down its performance – Thanh Trung Apr 15 at 18:12

All answers so far seem to do loads of unnecessary work, strlen calculations, string allocations (substr), etc. The 'strpos' and 'stripos' functions return the index of the first occurrence of $needle in $haystack:

function startsWith($haystack,$needle,$case=true)
{
    if ($case)
        return strpos($haystack, $needle, 0) === 0;

    return stripos($haystack, $needle, 0) === 0;
}

function endsWith($haystack,$needle,$case=true)
{
    $expectedPosition = strlen($haystack) - strlen($needle);

    if ($case)
        return strrpos($haystack, $needle, 0) === $expectedPosition;

    return strripos($haystack, $needle, 0) === $expectedPosition;
}
  • 2
    endsWith() function has an error. Its first line should be (without the -1): $expectedPosition = strlen($haystack) - strlen($needle); – Enrico Detoma Aug 5 '10 at 17:16
  • 6
    The strlen() thing is not unnecessary. In case the string doesn't start with the given needle then ur code will unnecessarily scan the whole haystack. – AppleGrew Jan 4 '11 at 15:46
  • 5
    @Mark yea, checking just the beginning is a LOT faster, especially if you're doing something like checking MIME types (or any other place where the string is bound to be large) – chacham15 Sep 26 '11 at 15:39
  • 2
    @mark I did some benchmarks with 1000 char haystack and 10 or 800 char needle and strpos was 30% faster. Do your benchmarks before stating that something is faster or not... – wdev Aug 6 '12 at 0:39
  • 6
    You should strongly consider quoting the needle like strpos($haystack, "$needle", 0) if there's any chance it's not already a string (e.g., if it's coming from json_decode()). Otherwise, the [odd] default behavior of strpos() may cause unexpected results: "If needle is not a string, it is converted to an integer and applied as the ordinal value of a character." – user113215 Dec 3 '12 at 3:47
function startsWith($haystack, $needle, $case = true) {
    if ($case) {
        return (strcmp(substr($haystack, 0, strlen($needle)), $needle) === 0);
    }
    return (strcasecmp(substr($haystack, 0, strlen($needle)), $needle) === 0);
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle, $case = true) {
    if ($case) {
        return (strcmp(substr($haystack, strlen($haystack) - strlen($needle)), $needle) === 0);
    }
    return (strcasecmp(substr($haystack, strlen($haystack) - strlen($needle)), $needle) === 0);
}

Credit To:

Check if a string ends with another string

Check if a string begins with another string

  • 1
    strtolower is not the best way to make case insensitive functions. In some locales casing is more complex than just upper and lower. – Sander Rijken May 13 '09 at 21:25
  • 7
    I see complaining and no solution... If you're gonna say it's bad, then you should give an example of how it should be as well. – KdgDev May 14 '09 at 11:06
  • 2
    @WebDevHobo: that's why I added an answer myself a day before your comment. For your code strcasecmp was indeed the right thing to do. – Sander Rijken Aug 6 '10 at 7:34
  • @Click_Upvote you should buy WebDev a beer :v – almosnow Apr 28 '11 at 16:20

The regex functions above, but with the other tweaks also suggested above:

 function startsWith($needle, $haystack) {
     return preg_match('/^' . preg_quote($needle, '/') . '/', $haystack);
 }

 function endsWith($needle, $haystack) {
     return preg_match('/' . preg_quote($needle, '/') . '$/', $haystack);
 }
  • 2
    in php for string operations the ordering of parameters is $haystack, $needle. these functions are backwards and act like array functions where the ordering is actually $needle, $haystack. – Andrew Anthony Gerst Dec 2 '14 at 1:59

If speed is important for you, try this.(I believe it is the fastest method)

Works only for strings and if $haystack is only 1 character

function startsWithChar($needle, $haystack)
{
   return ($needle[0] === $haystack);
}

function endsWithChar($needle, $haystack)
{
   return ($needle[strlen($needle) - 1] === $haystack);
}

$str='|apples}';
echo startsWithChar($str,'|'); //Returns true
echo endsWithChar($str,'}'); //Returns true
echo startsWithChar($str,'='); //Returns false
echo endsWithChar($str,'#'); //Returns false
  • 1
    this is probably the most efficient answer because not using any function as extra, just usual string... – user1646111 Aug 1 '13 at 10:29
  • It should likely check if string has at least one character and has the two parameter swapped – a1an May 15 at 14:51
  • 1
    Creative. Needles which contain haystacks. BTW there is some ugly waning with: endsWithChar('','x'), but the result is correct – Tino Jul 20 at 11:28

Here are two functions that don't introduce a temporary string, which could be useful when needles are substantially big:

function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0;
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return $needle === '' || substr_compare($haystack, $needle, -strlen($needle)) === 0;
}
  • 2
    +1 Works since PHP5.1 and IMHO best answer. But endsWidth should do return $needle==='' || substr_compare(... so it works as expected for -strlen($needle)===0 which, without the fix, makes endsWith('a','') return false – Tino Feb 20 '14 at 21:53
  • @Tino Thanks ... I feel that's a bug in substr_compare() actually, so I've added a PR to fix that :) – Ja͢ck Feb 21 '14 at 2:55
  • 2
    The call endsWith('', 'foo') triggers a Warning: “substr_compare(): The start position cannot exceed initial string length”. Maybe that's another bug in substr_compare(), but to avoid it, you need a pre-check like ...|| (strlen($needle) <= strlen($haystack) && substr_compare(...) === 0); – gx_ Aug 9 '15 at 19:47
  • @gx_ No need to slowdown with more code. Just use return $needle === '' || @substr_compare(.. to suppress this warning. – Tino Jul 20 at 11:35

This question already has many answers, but in some cases you can settle for something simpler than all of them. If the string you're looking for is known (hardcoded), you can use regular expressions without any quoting etc.

Check if a string starts with 'ABC':

preg_match('/^ABC/', $myString); // "^" here means beginning of string

ends with 'ABC':

preg_match('/ABC$/', $myString); // "$" here means end of string

In my simple case, I wanted to check if a string ends with slash:

preg_match('#/$#', $myPath);   // Use "#" as delimiter instead of escaping slash

The advantage: since it's very short and simple, you don't have to define a function (such as endsWith()) as shown above.

But again -- this is not a solution for every case, just this very specific one.

  • you don't need to hard code the string. the regex can be dynamic. – Ryan May 15 '16 at 3:02
  • 2
    @self true, but if the string is not hardcoded, you have to escape it. Currently there are 2 answers on this question that do it. This is easy, but it complicates the code just a bit. So my point was that for very simple cases, where hardcoding is possible, you can keep it simple. – noamtm May 15 '16 at 19:13
  • 1
    You also don't have to escape slash, you can wrap the regex in some other character, like @, so that slash (/) doesn't have to be escaped. See Example #3 here: php.net/manual/en/function.preg-match.php. – cjbarth Oct 24 at 13:16
  • Thanks @cjbarth. Changed my answer accordingly. BTW, "#" is the example given in php.net/manual/en/regexp.reference.delimiters.php when dealing with a slash. – noamtm Oct 30 at 19:57

I realize this has been finished, but you may want to look at strncmp as it allows you to put the length of the string to compare against, so:

function startsWith($haystack, $needle, $case=true) {
    if ($case)
        return strncasecmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) == 0;
    else
        return strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) == 0;
}    
  • how would you do endswith with this? – mpen Aug 26 '11 at 15:20
  • @Mark - you can look at the accepted answer, but I prefer to use strncmp mainly because I think it is safer. – James Black Aug 26 '11 at 16:45
  • I mean with strncmp specifically. You can't specify an offset. That would mean your endsWith function would have to use a different method entirely. – mpen Aug 26 '11 at 18:50
  • @Mark - For endsWith I would just use strrpos (php.net/manual/en/function.strrpos.php), but, generally, anytime you go to use strcmp strncmp is probably a safer option. – James Black Aug 27 '11 at 0:15

You can use strpos and strrpos

$bStartsWith = strpos($sHaystack, $sNeedle) == 0;
$bEndsWith = strrpos($sHaystack, $sNeedle) == strlen($sHaystack)-strlen($sNeedle);
  • 1
    Should you be using triple equals here strpos($sHaystack, $sNeedle) == 0 like this strpos($sHaystack, $sNeedle) === 0? I see a bug, when false == 0 evaluates to true. – Kalyan Jun 23 '17 at 14:37

Short and easy-to-understand one-liners without regular expressions.

startsWith() is straight forward.

function startsWith($haystack, $needle) {
   return (strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0);
}

endsWith() uses the slightly fancy and slow strrev():

function endsWith($haystack, $needle) {
   return (strpos(strrev($haystack), strrev($needle)) === 0);
}
  • 1
    strpos is not the "right tool".. (and neither strrev) – FrancescoMM Jul 28 '13 at 14:19
  • @FrancescoMM: strpos is not the "right tool"... Why? What are the "right tools" then? EDIT: I read your answer below. I thought programming is like invention using the resources you have.. So there's no right or wrong... only working or not working... performance is secondary. – Fr0zenFyr Mar 24 at 8:22
  • "because it is a tool for searching, not for comparing?" Cit. Aristoteles – FrancescoMM Mar 24 at 8:42

Focusing on startswith, if you are sure strings are not empty, adding a test on the first char, before the comparison, the strlen, etc., speeds things up a bit:

function startswith5b($haystack, $needle) {
    return ($haystack{0}==$needle{0})?strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) === 0:FALSE;
}

It is somehow (20%-30%) faster. Adding another char test, like $haystack{1}===$needle{1} does not seem to speedup things much, may even slow down.

=== seems faster than == Conditional operator (a)?b:c seems faster than if(a) b; else c;


For those asking "why not use strpos?" calling other solutions "unnecessary work"


strpos is fast, but it is not the right tool for this job.

To understand, here is a little simulation as an example:

Search a12345678c inside bcdefga12345678xbbbbb.....bbbbba12345678c

What the computer does "inside"?

    With strccmp, etc...

    is a===b? NO
    return false



    With strpos

    is a===b? NO -- iterating in haysack
    is a===c? NO
    is a===d? NO
    ....
    is a===g? NO
    is a===g? NO
    is a===a? YES
    is 1===1? YES -- iterating in needle
    is 2===3? YES
    is 4===4? YES
    ....
    is 8===8? YES
    is c===x? NO: oh God,
    is a===1? NO -- iterating in haysack again
    is a===2? NO
    is a===3? NO
    is a===4? NO
    ....
    is a===x? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    is a===b? NO
    ...
    ... may many times...
    ...
    is a===b? NO
    is a===a? YES -- iterating in needle again
    is 1===1? YES
    is 2===3? YES
    is 4===4? YES
    is 8===8? YES
    is c===c? YES YES YES I have found the same string! yay!
    was it at position 0? NOPE
    What you mean NO? So the string I found is useless? YEs.
    Damn.
    return false

Assuming strlen does not iterate the whole string (but even in that case) this is not convenient at all.

  • There's only a speed up if the first characters are different. – Ja͢ck Aug 2 '13 at 7:51
  • 2
    @Jack yes, of course, the idea is that statistically that happens, so the speedup is generrally a 20%-30% over the whole test set (including cases where it is not different). You gain a lot when they are different and loose very little when they are not. In the average you gain that 30% (varies depending on set, but mostly you gain speed on large tests) – FrancescoMM Sep 18 '13 at 8:42
  • "but it is not the right tool for this job"... Any citation? – Fr0zenFyr Mar 24 at 8:29
  • 1
    WTF. I listed all the process below whom should I cite, more than that? Would you use a function that searches till the end of a string to tell you that the fist character is not an 'a'? Do it who cares? It's not the right tool because it is a tool for searching, not for comparing, there is no need to cite Aristoteles to state the obvious! – FrancescoMM Mar 24 at 8:40

I usually end up going with a library like underscore-php these days.

require_once("vendor/autoload.php"); //use if needed
use Underscore\Types\String; 

$str = "there is a string";
echo( String::startsWith($str, 'the') ); // 1
echo( String::endsWith($str, 'ring')); // 1   

The library is full of other handy functions.

The answer by mpen is incredibly thorough, but, unfortunately, the provided benchmark has a very important and detrimental oversight.

Because every byte in needles and haystacks is completely random, the probability that a needle-haystack pair will differ on the very first byte is 99.609375%, which means that, on average, about 99609 of the 100000 pairs will differ on the very first byte. In other words, the benchmark is heavily biased towards startswith implementations which check the first byte explicitly, as strncmp_startswith2 does.

If the test-generating loop is instead implemented as follows:

echo 'generating tests';
for($i = 0; $i < 100000; ++$i) {
    if($i % 2500 === 0) echo '.';

    $haystack_length = random_int(1, 7000);
    $haystack = random_bytes($haystack_length);

    $needle_length = random_int(1, 3000);
    $overlap_length = min(random_int(0, $needle_length), $haystack_length);
    $needle = ($needle_length > $overlap_length) ?
        substr($haystack, 0, $overlap_length) . random_bytes($needle_length - $overlap_length) :
        substr($haystack, 0, $needle_length);

    $test_cases[] = [$haystack, $needle];
}
echo " done!<br />";

the benchmark results tell a slightly different story:

strncmp_startswith: 223.0 ms
substr_startswith: 228.0 ms
substr_compare_startswith: 238.0 ms
strncmp_startswith2: 253.0 ms
strpos_startswith: 349.0 ms
preg_match_startswith: 20,828.7 ms

Of course, this benchmark may still not be perfectly unbiased, but it tests the efficiency of the algorithms when given partially matching needles as well.

Here's a multi-byte safe version of the accepted answer, it works fine for UTF-8 strings:

function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    $length = mb_substr($needle, 'UTF-8');
    return (mb_substr($haystack, 0, $length, 'UTF-8') === $needle);
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    $length = mb_strlen($needle, 'UTF-8');
    return $length === 0 ||
        (mb_substr($haystack, -$length, $length, 'UTF-8') === $needle);
}
  • 1
    im pretty sure this is just a waste of CPU. all you need to check, for StarstWith and EndsWith, is just checking that the bytes match, and that's exactly what the accepted answer is doing. this 1 wastes time calculating the number of utf8 characters of the needle, and where the position of the n'th utf8 character of the haystack is.. i think, without being 100% certain, this is just a waste of cpu. can you come up with an actual test case where the accepted answer fails, and this doesn't? – hanshenrik May 12 at 0:06
  • @hanshenrik - it could happen btw, in the very rare case when you look for a string that contains the same bytes as an UTF8 but with half of the last character missing. Like, you have unicode C5 91 (letter "ő") and you look for C5 (letter "Å") it shouldn't give you a match. On the other hand, sure, why would you search an utf haystack for a non-utf needle... But for bulletproof checks, this must be considered a possibility. – dkellner Sep 8 at 10:43

Fastest endsWith() solution:

# Checks if a string ends in a string
function endsWith($haystack, $needle) {
    return substr($haystack,-strlen($needle))===$needle;
}

Benchmark:

# This answer
function endsWith($haystack, $needle) {
    return substr($haystack,-strlen($needle))===$needle;
}

# Accepted answer
function endsWith2($haystack, $needle) {
    $length = strlen($needle);

    return $length === 0 ||
    (substr($haystack, -$length) === $needle);
}

# Second most-voted answer
function endsWith3($haystack, $needle) {
    // search forward starting from end minus needle length characters
    if ($needle === '') {
        return true;
    }
    $diff = \strlen($haystack) - \strlen($needle);
    return $diff >= 0 && strpos($haystack, $needle, $diff) !== false;
}

# Regex answer
function endsWith4($haystack, $needle) {
    return preg_match('/' . preg_quote($needle, '/') . '$/', $haystack);
}

function timedebug() {
    $test = 10000000;

    $time1 = microtime(true);
    for ($i=0; $i < $test; $i++) {
        $tmp = endsWith('TestShortcode', 'Shortcode');
    }
    $time2 = microtime(true);
    $result1 = $time2 - $time1;

    for ($i=0; $i < $test; $i++) {
        $tmp = endsWith2('TestShortcode', 'Shortcode');
    }
    $time3 = microtime(true);
    $result2 = $time3 - $time2;

    for ($i=0; $i < $test; $i++) {
        $tmp = endsWith3('TestShortcode', 'Shortcode');
    }
    $time4 = microtime(true);
    $result3 = $time4 - $time3;

    for ($i=0; $i < $test; $i++) {
        $tmp = endsWith4('TestShortcode', 'Shortcode');
    }
    $time5 = microtime(true);
    $result4 = $time5 - $time4;

    echo $test.'x endsWith: '.$result1.' seconds # This answer<br>';
    echo $test.'x endsWith2: '.$result4.' seconds # Accepted answer<br>';
    echo $test.'x endsWith3: '.$result2.' seconds # Second most voted answer<br>';
    echo $test.'x endsWith4: '.$result3.' seconds # Regex answer<br>';
    exit;
}
timedebug();

Benchmark Results:

10000000x endsWith: 1.5760900974274 seconds # This answer
10000000x endsWith2: 3.7102129459381 seconds # Accepted answer
10000000x endsWith3: 1.8731069564819 seconds # Second most voted answer
10000000x endsWith4: 2.1521229743958 seconds # Regex answer
  • 1
    +1 for taking time to compare different solutions and actually benchmark them! you should also mention what version of PHP you used, as optimisations are done as the language evolves! I've seen dramatic improvements on string comparison functions from one PHP version to another :) – Christophe Deliens Oct 3 at 13:51

I hope that the below answer may be efficient and also simple:

$content = "The main string to search";
$search = "T";
//For compare the begining string with case insensitive. 
if(stripos($content, $search) === 0) echo 'Yes';
else echo 'No';

//For compare the begining string with case sensitive. 
if(strpos($content, $search) === 0) echo 'Yes';
else echo 'No';

//For compare the ending string with case insensitive. 
if(stripos(strrev($content), strrev($search)) === 0) echo 'Yes';
else echo 'No';

//For compare the ending string with case sensitive. 
if(strpos(strrev($content), strrev($search)) === 0) echo 'Yes';
else echo 'No';

The substr function can return false in many special cases, so here is my version, which deals with these issues:

function startsWith( $haystack, $needle ){
  return $needle === ''.substr( $haystack, 0, strlen( $needle )); // substr's false => empty string
}

function endsWith( $haystack, $needle ){
  $len = strlen( $needle );
  return $needle === ''.substr( $haystack, -$len, $len ); // ! len=0
}

Tests (true means good):

var_dump( startsWith('',''));
var_dump( startsWith('1',''));
var_dump(!startsWith('','1'));
var_dump( startsWith('1','1'));
var_dump( startsWith('1234','12'));
var_dump(!startsWith('1234','34'));
var_dump(!startsWith('12','1234'));
var_dump(!startsWith('34','1234'));
var_dump('---');
var_dump( endsWith('',''));
var_dump( endsWith('1',''));
var_dump(!endsWith('','1'));
var_dump( endsWith('1','1'));
var_dump(!endsWith('1234','12'));
var_dump( endsWith('1234','34'));
var_dump(!endsWith('12','1234'));
var_dump(!endsWith('34','1234'));

Also, the substr_compare function also worth looking. http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.substr-compare.php

in short:

function startsWith($str, $needle){
   return substr($str, 0, strlen($needle)) === $needle;
}

function endsWith($str, $needle){
   $length = strlen($needle);
   return !$length || substr($str, - $length) === $needle;
}

This may work

function startsWith($haystack, $needle) {
     return substr($haystack, 0, strlen($needle)) == $needle;
}

Source: https://stackoverflow.com/a/4419658

Why not the following?

//How to check if a string begins with another string
$haystack = "valuehaystack";
$needle = "value";
if (strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0){
    echo "Found " . $needle . " at the beginning of " . $haystack . "!";
}

Output:

Found value at the beginning of valuehaystack!

Keep in mind, strpos will return false if the needle was not found in the haystack, and will return 0 if, and only if, needle was found at index 0 (AKA the beginning).

And here's endsWith:

$haystack = "valuehaystack";
$needle = "haystack";

//If index of the needle plus the length of the needle is the same length as the entire haystack.
if (strpos($haystack, $needle) + strlen($needle) === strlen($haystack)){
    echo "Found " . $needle . " at the end of " . $haystack . "!";
}

In this scenario there is no need for a function startsWith() as

(strpos($stringToSearch, $doesItStartWithThis) === 0)

will return true or false accurately.

It seems odd it's this simple with all the wild functions running rampant here.

  • 3
    Seems odd that if you are searching for "xy" inside string "abcdefghijklmxyz" instead of just comparing "x" to "a" and returning FALSE, you look every character from "a" to "m" then end up finding "xy" inside the string, and at last you return FALSE because the position of it is not zero! This is what you are doing, and it is odd and wilder than any other rampant function here. – FrancescoMM Jan 23 '14 at 15:05
  • The simplicity is in the typing, not the logic. – Kade Hafen Jan 23 '14 at 17:34
  • It's not so much the logic, it's the possible optimization that Francsco was pointing out. Using strpos() will be slow except when it does match. strncmp() would be much better in this case. – Alexis Wilke Jul 2 '14 at 0:33
  • When you're doing such low level functions, you typically want to go for the most speed-optimized solution, no matter how complex, as this will be called millions of times. Every microsecond you gain or lose here will make a very real difference. So better tweak the hell out of it (and then forget about the complexity, now that you have the function), instead of going for the looks and lose horrifying amount of time later when you don't even know what's gone wrong. Imagine checking a 2GB string that doesn't match. – dkellner Sep 3 at 13:09

I would do it like this

     function startWith($haystack,$needle){
              if(substr($haystack,0, strlen($needle))===$needle)
              return true;
        }

  function endWith($haystack,$needle){
              if(substr($haystack, -strlen($needle))===$needle)
              return true;
        }
  • Forgetting to return false if it doesn't match. Errgo incorrect as is the return value of a function should not be 'assumed', but I know what you're going after at least compared to other answers. – Spoo Oct 7 '16 at 19:58

Just a recommendation:

function startsWith($haystack,$needle) {
    if($needle==="") return true;
    if($haystack[0]<>$needle[0]) return false;
    if(substr_compare($haystack,$needle,0,strlen($needle))==0) return true;
    return false;
}

That extra line, comparing the first character of the strings, can make the false case return immediately, therefore making many of your comparisons a lot faster (7x faster when I measured). In the true case you pay virtually no price in performance for that single line so I think it's worth including. (Also, in practice, when you test many strings for a specific starting chunk, most comparisons will fail since in a typical case you're looking for something.)

  • 1
    Bug in your code: startsWith("123", "0") gives true – Tino Jul 20 at 11:10
  • Yup, bad !$checking happened. Sorry! (Just wanted to illustrate the concept in line 3) – dkellner Jul 20 at 14:43

Based on James Black's answer, here is its endsWith version:

function startsWith($haystack, $needle, $case=true) {
    if ($case)
        return strncmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) == 0;
    else
        return strncasecmp($haystack, $needle, strlen($needle)) == 0;
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle, $case=true) {
     return startsWith(strrev($haystack),strrev($needle),$case);

}

Note: I have swapped the if-else part for James Black's startsWith function, because strncasecmp is actually the case-insensitive version of strncmp.

  • 2
    Note that the strrev() is creative but very costly, especially if you have strings of say... 100Kb. – Alexis Wilke Jun 25 '14 at 2:45
  • Use === instead of == to be sure. 0 is equal to a lot of things in PHP. – nawfal Jan 29 '16 at 11:38

You also can use regular expressions:

function endsWith($haystack, $needle, $case=true) {
  return preg_match("/.*{$needle}$/" . (($case) ? "" : "i"), $haystack);
}
  • 3
    $needle should be escaped with preg_quote($needle, '/'). – Krinkle Nov 16 '12 at 15:10

Many of the previous answers will work just as well. However, this is possibly as short as you can make it and have it do what you desire. You just state that you'd like it to 'return true'. So I've included solutions that returns boolean true/false and the textual true/false.

// boolean true/false
function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0 ? 1 : 0;
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return stripos($haystack, $needle) === 0 ? 1 : 0;
}


// textual true/false
function startsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return strpos($haystack, $needle) === 0 ? 'true' : 'false';
}

function endsWith($haystack, $needle)
{
    return stripos($haystack, $needle) === 0 ? 'true' : 'false';
}
  • 1
    does not work with $needle==='0' – Tino Feb 20 '14 at 21:31
  • True. However, Peter was asking for a function that would work with character strings. Nonetheless, I've updated my answer to appease you. – wynshaft Oct 23 '14 at 21:02
  • After the edit your solution now is completely obsolete. It returns 'true' and 'false' as strings, which are both true in a boolean sense. It's a good pattern for something like underhanded.xcott.com though ;) – Tino Oct 26 '14 at 11:08
  • Well, Peter just stated he wanted it to return 'true'. So I figured I'd return what he asked for. I've added both versions, just in case that isn't what he wanted. – wynshaft Oct 27 '14 at 13:04

Here’s an efficient solution for PHP 4. You could get faster results if on PHP 5 by using substr_compare instead of strcasecmp(substr(...)).

function stringBeginsWith($haystack, $beginning, $caseInsensitivity = false)
{
    if ($caseInsensitivity)
        return strncasecmp($haystack, $beginning, strlen($beginning)) === 0;
    else
        return strncmp($haystack, $beginning, strlen($beginning)) === 0;
}

function stringEndsWith($haystack, $ending, $caseInsensitivity = false)
{
    if ($caseInsensitivity)
        return strcasecmp(substr($haystack, strlen($haystack) - strlen($ending)), $haystack) === 0;
    else
        return strpos($haystack, $ending, strlen($haystack) - strlen($ending)) !== false;
}
$ends_with = strrchr($text, '.'); // Ends with dot
$start_with = (0 === strpos($text, '.')); // Starts with dot
  • 3
    According to the docs, strrchr() will return the string from the last occurrence of '.' until the end, meaning your $ends_with would be true if '.' is anywhere in $text. Therefore ends_with should be: ('.' === strrchr($text, '.')) – Sam Bull Jul 5 '16 at 13:20
  • 4
    As your answer is wrong and does not do what it claims, and you refuse to accept my edit to fix your answer, I'm downvoting this answer as it is "dangerously incorrect". – Sam Bull Mar 25 '17 at 17:33

Not sure why this is so difficult for people. Substr does a great job and is efficient as you don't need to search the whole string if it doesn't match.

Additionally, since I'm not checking integer values but comparing strings I don't have to necessarily have to worry about the strict === case. However, === is a good habit to get into.

function startsWith($haystack,$needle) {
  substring($haystack,0,strlen($needle)) == $needle) { return true; }
   return false;
}

function endsWith($haystack,$needle) {
  if(substring($haystack,-strlen($needle)) == $needle) { return true; }
   return false;
}

or even better optimized.

function startsWith($haystack,$needle) {
  return substring($haystack,0,strlen($needle)) == $needle);
}

function endsWith($haystack,$needle) {
  return substring($haystack,-strlen($needle)) == $needle);
}
  • 1
    What is different or new in your answer compared to MrHus's answer? – Salman A Oct 8 '16 at 6:33

protected by DaveRandom Feb 28 '13 at 12:17

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