This should be a simple task but I have seen several attempts on how to get the path to the directory where the executed cmdlet is located with mixed success. For instance when I execute c:\temp\myscripts\mycmdlet.ps1 which has a settings file at c:\temp\myscripts\settings.xml I would like to be able to store c:\temp\myscripts in a variable within mycmdlet.ps1.

This is one solution which works (although a bit cumbersome):

$invocation = (Get-Variable MyInvocation).Value
$directorypath = Split-Path $invocation.MyCommand.Path
$settingspath = $directorypath + '\settings.xml'

Another one suggested this solution which only works on our test environment:

$settingspath = '.\settings.xml'

I like the latter approach a lot and prefer it to having to parse the filepath as a parameter each time, but I can't get it to work on my development environment. Does anyone have a suggestion on what to do? Does it have something to do with how PowerShell is configured?

  • 5
    Note that the ambiguous title of this question has resulted in the answers below solving one of two distinct problems, without explicitly stating which: (a) how to reference the current location (directory) or (b) how to reference the running script's location (the directory in which the running script is located, which may or may not be the current directory). – mklement0 Jan 24 at 4:21
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12 Answers 12

up vote 101 down vote accepted

The reliable way to do this is just like you showed $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Path.

Using relative paths will be based on $pwd, in PowerShell, the current directory for an application, or the current working directory for a .NET API.

Yes that should work. But if you need to see the absolute path, this is all you need:

(Get-Item -Path ".\").FullName
  • 3
    Thanks, this is a great method to find the full path from relative paths. E.g. (Get-Item -Path $myRelativePath -Verbose).FullName – dlux May 6 '14 at 3:51
  • Thank you for this. Other answers weren't working for Powershell scripts compiled to EXEs. – Zach Alexander Nov 3 '17 at 14:40
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    This is wrong. This gets the current directory of the process, which can be anywhere. For example, if my command line current directory is C:\mydir, and I invoke the command C:\dir1\dir2\dir3\mycmdlet.ps1, then this will resolve to C:\mydir, not C:\dir1\dir2\dir3. Invoking a new executable has the same problem since the current directory is inherited from the parent process. – jpmc26 Apr 13 at 21:00

The easiest method seems to be to use the following predefined variable:

 $PSScriptRoot

about_Automatic_Variables and about_Scripts both state:

In PowerShell 2.0, this variable is valid only in script modules (.psm1). Beginning in PowerShell 3.0, it is valid in all scripts.

I use it like this:

 $MyFileName = "data.txt"
 $filebase = Join-Path $PSScriptRoot $MyFileName
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    It is version specific. This requires at least Powershell 3.0. – Marvin Dickhaus Apr 10 '15 at 13:46
  • This is what I needed to reference a file in the same location as the script--thanks! – Adam Prescott Nov 21 '17 at 14:51
  • This is the best answer as it gives you precisely the path where you PS script is present which is essentially the root for your script execution. It doesn't care what is your present working directory from where you've invoked your scripts. +1. – RBT May 17 at 0:31
  • @MarvinDickhaus That's why it's needed to use "Set-StrictMode -Version 3.0" in most your scripts :) Big thank's for the links! – Alexander Shapkin May 28 at 13:08

You can also use:

(Resolve-Path .\).Path

The part in brackets returns a PathInfo object.

(Available since PowerShell 2.0.)

  • 1
    This is wrong. This gets the current directory of the process, which can be anywhere. For example, if my command line current directory is C:\mydir, and I invoke the command C:\dir1\dir2\dir3\mycmdlet.ps1, then this will resolve to C:\mydir, not C:\dir1\dir2\dir3. Invoking a new executable has the same problem since the current directory is inherited from the parent process. – jpmc26 Apr 13 at 21:04
  • Thanks! I also misunderstood the title of this question, and this answer was exactly what I was looking for. However... It doesn't answer the question. – Ryan The Leach Jun 28 at 7:41

Path is often null. This function is safer.

function Get-ScriptDirectory
{
    $Invocation = (Get-Variable MyInvocation -Scope 1).Value;
    if($Invocation.PSScriptRoot)
    {
        $Invocation.PSScriptRoot;
    }
    Elseif($Invocation.MyCommand.Path)
    {
        Split-Path $Invocation.MyCommand.Path
    }
    else
    {
        $Invocation.InvocationName.Substring(0,$Invocation.InvocationName.LastIndexOf("\"));
    }
}
  • why -Scope 1? not -Scope 0 – suiwenfeng Jan 19 '16 at 6:31
  • Get-Variable : The scope number '1' exceeds the number of active scopes. – suiwenfeng Jan 19 '16 at 6:32
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    You're getting this error because you have no parent scope. -Scope parameter gets the variable in a specified scope. 1 in this case is the parent scope. For more info see this technet article about Get-Variable ( technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh849899.aspx ) – Christian Flem Jan 20 '16 at 9:16

Try :

(Get-Location).path

or:

($pwd).path

Get-Location will return the current location:

$Currentlocation=Get-Location
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    PS C:\Windows\system32> C:\powershell\checkfile.ps1 --> this will give c:\windows\system32 – nbi Apr 10 '17 at 18:15

I like the one line solution :)

$scriptDir = Split-Path -Path $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Definition -Parent
  • This is the best solution so far. – Teoman shipahi Jan 12 '17 at 17:54
  • Yes works for me. My pwd is my user directory and I'm running the script in another directory (B) it gives (B) – andrew pate Apr 6 at 13:36

Try this:

$WorkingDir = Convert-Path .

You would think that using '.\' as the path means that it's the invocation path. But not all the time. Example, if you use it inside a job ScriptBlock. In which case, it might point to %profile%\Documents.

To expand on @Cradle 's answer: you could also write a multi-purpose function that will get you the same result per the OP's question:

Function Get-AbsolutePath {

    [CmdletBinding()]
    Param(
        [parameter(
            Mandatory=$false,
            ValueFromPipeline=$true
        )]
        [String]$relativePath=".\"
    )

    if (Test-Path -Path $relativePath) {
        return (Get-Item -Path $relativePath).FullName -replace "\\$", ""
    } else {
        Write-Error -Message "'$relativePath' is not a valid path" -ErrorId 1 -ErrorAction Stop
    }

}

In Powershell 3 and above you can simply use

$PSScriptRoot

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