186

I want to import foo-bar.py. This works:

foobar = __import__("foo-bar")

This does not:

from "foo-bar" import *

My question: Is there any way that I can use the above format i.e., from "foo-bar" import * to import a module that has a - in it?

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  • 10
    Why do you have a module with a dash in its name? – Matti Virkkunen Dec 2 '11 at 2:00
  • 20
    I'm guessing it was originally written as a script rather than as a module. – Michael Hoffman Dec 2 '11 at 2:19
  • 1
    possible duplicate of Python Module with a dash, or hyphen (-) in its name – Piotr Dobrogost Feb 26 '14 at 14:40
  • @MattiVirkkunen makepy.py of win32com will generate module with dash in it. too bad. comtypes solved this by converting it to underscore – swdev Apr 11 '14 at 1:45
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    @MattiVirkkunen I think Python should not limit the names I can give my directories. It is not its responsibility to do so. – Zelphir Kaltstahl Nov 11 '16 at 12:34
113

you can't. foo-bar is not an identifier. rename the file to foo_bar.py

Edit: If import is not your goal (as in: you don't care what happens with sys.modules, you don't need it to import itself), just getting all of the file's globals into your own scope, you can use execfile

# contents of foo-bar.py
baz = 'quux'
>>> execfile('foo-bar.py')
>>> baz
'quux'
>>> 
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  • 21
    Python 3.x What’s New In Python 3.0 Removed execfile(). Instead of execfile(fn) use exec(open(fn).read()) Also there is package importlib. – DevPlayer Apr 8 '15 at 14:26
101

If you can't rename the module to match Python naming conventions, create a new module to act as an intermediary:

 ---- foo_proxy.py ----
 tmp = __import__('foo-bar')
 globals().update(vars(tmp))

 ---- main.py ----
 from foo_proxy import * 
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  • 27
    I would never implement this. But I can't not give +1 for the sheer brilliance of this hack – inspectorG4dget Dec 2 '11 at 2:25
  • 11
    you could actually do this without the foo_proxy.py file, assign the output of __import__(...) to sys.modules['foo_proxy']. Actually, don't do that, it's a terrible idea. – SingleNegationElimination Dec 2 '11 at 14:03
  • 2
    Cool just what I was looking for. There is a usecase, if one uses native libraries which are shipped with a distribution. – Sven May 8 '13 at 14:59
78

Starting from Python 3.1, you can use importlib :

import importlib  
foobar = importlib.import_module("foo-bar")

( https://docs.python.org/3/library/importlib.html )

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45

If you can't rename the original file, you could also use a symlink:

ln -s foo-bar.py foo_bar.py

Then you can just:

from foo_bar import *
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2

Like other said you can't use the "-" in python naming, there are many workarounds, one such workaround which would be useful if you had to add multiple modules from a path is using sys.path

For example if your structure is like this:

foo-bar
├── barfoo.py
└── __init__.py

import sys
sys.path.append('foo-bar')

import barfoo
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