I have two shell scripts, a.sh and b.sh.

How can I call b.sh from within the shell script a.sh?

  • 7
    Can you give some specifics: which OS and which shell(s) or are you just talking about that problem in principle?? Example code would be helpful as well. – jsalonen Dec 2 '11 at 7:07
  • 12
    This is not really a specific question nor does it demonstrate prior effort to solve the issue. – Kris Jul 29 '14 at 7:37
  • 1
    One issue I was having was that b.sh did not have executable permissions. It might be a good thing to check. – seth10 Mar 28 '17 at 12:57
  • Append ./ before the script name, example, instead: b.sh, use: ./b.sh – Benny Jul 2 at 14:02
  • If anyone keeps getting No such file or directory error stackoverflow.com/a/2920431/1356559 – Amr Lotfy Aug 15 at 1:10

16 Answers 16

There are a couple of different ways you can do this:

  1. Make the other script executable, add the #!/bin/bash line at the top, and the path where the file is to the $PATH environment variable. Then you can call it as a normal command;

  2. Or call it with the source command (alias is .) like this: source /path/to/script;

  3. Or use the bash command to execute it: /bin/bash /path/to/script;

The first and third methods execute the script as another process, so variables and functions in the other script will not be accessible.
The second method executes the script in the first script's process, and pulls in variables and functions from the other script so they are usable from the calling script.

In the second method, if you are using exit in second script, it will exit the first script as well. Which will not happen in first and third methods.

  • 20
    remember to chmod a+x /path/to/file or else it's not going to be executable. Only applies to the ./script method. – Nathan Lilienthal Mar 1 '13 at 19:56
  • 3
    Remember to change format/encoding of executable files in unix if they are created in DOS and then uploaded to unix environment -> dos2unix <script name> – Abhishek Chatterjee Feb 5 '14 at 6:19
  • 2
    @cecemel The first and third way could be "async" by using the normal run-in-background syntax. – Some programmer dude May 8 '15 at 12:40
  • 12
    The problem with source is that an exit statement in the called script will exit yours as well... – Ohad Schneider Jan 14 '16 at 16:36
  • 13
    @user528025 . is not an alias for source, but rather the other way around. source is a bash extension, while . works in any POSIX compatible shell. – Score_Under Jan 16 '16 at 21:51

Check this out.

#!/bin/bash
echo "This script is about to run another script."
sh ./script.sh
echo "This script has just run another script."
  • how to specify the path? – VizZy Oct 13 '14 at 4:58
  • 4
    This assumes that script.sh is in the same directory as the whatever script is running. If you wanted to call a script somewhere else, you would say sh <path to script>/script.sh – Morgan Kenyon Aug 21 '15 at 20:32
  • 15
    This also uses two shells, bash and sh. Even when sh is in fact bash it doesn't behave the same. If you're using #!/bin/bash then you probably want to use bash script.sh (or just ./script.sh to use that scripts's hashbang). – Martin Tournoij Nov 14 '16 at 7:47
  • 1
    Kept getting permission denied error even when I set the chmod +x to the .sh file. Any suggestions? – isaac weathers Nov 15 '16 at 7:09

There are a couple of ways you can do this. Terminal to execute the script:

#!/bin/bash
SCRIPT_PATH="/path/to/script.sh"

# Here you execute your script
"$SCRIPT_PATH"

# or
. "$SCRIPT_PATH"

# or
source "$SCRIPT_PATH"

# or
bash "$SCRIPT_PATH"

# or
eval '"$SCRIPT_PATH"'

# or
OUTPUT=$("$SCRIPT_PATH")
echo $OUTPUT

# or
OUTPUT=`"$SCRIPT_PATH"`
echo $OUTPUT

# or
("$SCRIPT_PATH")

# or
(exec "$SCRIPT_PATH")

All this is correct for the path with spaces!!!

  • 28
    What are their differences? Why one, why another? – rocketspacer Mar 14 '17 at 21:39
  • . "$SCRIPT_PATH" is preferred – Harry Mumford-Turner Oct 6 '17 at 11:08

The answer which I was looking for:

( exec "path/to/script" )

As mentioned, exec replaces the shell without creating a new process. However, we can put it in a subshell, which is done using the parantheses.

EDIT: Actually ( "path/to/script" ) is enough.

  • 6
    This seems pretty convoluted. Why not just call it with /path/to/script? I don't see the need for exec at all here? – Martin Tournoij Nov 14 '16 at 7:48
  • @Carpetsmoker, you're very right! edited. – Max Chetrusca Nov 15 '16 at 19:51
  • The subshell isn't needed either since you are not execing. – Karel Vlk Oct 6 '17 at 11:44
  • 4
    how would you execute this script with arguments? – Bhargav Nov 16 '17 at 8:50
  • If you want to still capture the output of the sub-script try $(source "path/to/script") – cmcginty May 1 at 6:39

Depends on. Briefly... If you want load variables on current console and execute you may use source myshellfile.sh on your code. Example:

!#/bin/bash
set -x
echo "This is an example of run another INTO this session."
source my_lib_of_variables_and_functions.sh
echo "The function internal_function() is defined into my lib."
returned_value=internal_function()
echo $this_is_an_internal_variable

set +x

If you just want to execute a file and the only thing intersting for you is the result, you can do:

!#/bin/bash
set -x
./executing_only.sh
sh i_can_execute_this_way_too.sh
bash or_this_way.sh
set +x

I hope helps you. Thanks.

  • 2
    Note that source is a bash-specific feature. The standard bourne shell only has . (e.g. . other_script.sh). – Martin Tournoij Nov 14 '16 at 7:49

You can use /bin/sh to call or execute another script (via your actual script):

 # cat showdate.sh
 #!/bin/bash
 echo "Date is: `date`"

 # cat mainscript.sh
 #!/bin/bash
 echo "You are login as: `whoami`"
 echo "`/bin/sh ./showdate.sh`" # exact path for the script file

The output would be:

 # ./mainscript.sh
 You are login as: root
 Date is: Thu Oct 17 02:56:36 EDT 2013
  • Surely this will run showdate.sh under /bin/sh rather than /bin/bash? – CJxD Jan 6 '17 at 10:44
  • i have tried with "/bin/sh ./showdate.sh", "/bin/bash ./showdate.sh", "./showdate.sh" and run the file: mainscript.sh and got same output. – Ranjithkumar T May 2 '17 at 6:14

Just add in a line whatever you would have typed in a terminal to execute the script!
e.g.:

#!bin/bash
./myscript.sh &

if the script to be executed is not in same directory, just use the complete path of the script.
e.g.:`/home/user/script-directory/./myscript.sh &

First you have to include the file you call:

#!/bin/bash
. includes/included_file.sh

then you call your function like this:

#!/bin/bash
my_called_function

Simple source will help you. For Ex.

#!/bin/bash
echo "My shell_1"
source my_script1.sh
echo "Back in shell_1"
pathToShell="/home/praveen/"   
chmod a+x $pathToShell"myShell.sh"
sh $pathToShell"myShell.sh"
 #!/bin/bash

 # Here you define the absolute path of your script

 scriptPath="/home/user/pathScript/"

 # Name of your script

 scriptName="myscript.sh"

 # Here you execute your script

 $scriptPath/$scriptName

 # Result of script execution

 result=$?
  • 1
    incorrect for folder scriptPath or file name scriptName with spaces – Andrei Krasutski Feb 6 '17 at 13:33

Assume the new file is "/home/satya/app/app_specific_env" and the file contents are as follows

#!bin/bash

export FAV_NUMBER="2211"

Append this file reference to ~/.bashrc file

source /home/satya/app/app_specific_env

When ever you restart the machine or relogin, try echo $FAV_NUMBER in the terminal. It will output the value.

Just in case if you want to see the effect right away, source ~/.bashrc in the command line.

chmod a+x /path/to/file-to-be-executed

That was the only thing I needed. Once the script to be executed is made executable like this, you (at least in my case) don't need any other extra operation like sh or ./ while you are calling the script.

Thanks to the comment of @Nathan Lilienthal

The top answer suggests adding #!/bin/bash line to the first line of the sub-script being called. But even if you add the shebang, it is much faster* to run a script in a sub-shell and capture the output:

$(source SCRIPT_NAME)

This works when you want to keep running the same interpreter (e.g. from bash to another bash script) and ensures that the shebang line of the sub-script is not executed.

For example:

#!/bin/bash
SUB_SCRIPT=$(mktemp)
echo "#!/bin/bash" > $SUB_SCRIPT
echo 'echo $1' >> $SUB_SCRIPT
chmod +x $SUB_SCRIPT
if [[ $1 == "--source" ]]; then
  for X in $(seq 100); do
    MODE=$(source $SUB_SCRIPT "source on")
  done
else
  for X in $(seq 100); do
    MODE=$($SUB_SCRIPT "source off")
  done
fi
echo $MODE
rm $SUB_SCRIPT

Output:

~ ❯❯❯ time ./test.sh
source off
./test.sh  0.15s user 0.16s system 87% cpu 0.360 total

~ ❯❯❯ time ./test.sh --source
source on
./test.sh --source  0.05s user 0.06s system 95% cpu 0.114 total

* For example when virus or security tools are running on a device it might take an extra 100ms to exec a new process.

Use backticks.

$ ./script-that-consumes-argument.sh `sh script-that-produces-argument.sh`

Then fetch the output of the producer script as an argument on the consumer script.

There are some problems to import functions from other file.
First: You needn't to do this file executable. Better not to do so! just add

. file

to import all functions. And all of them will be as if they are defined in your file.
Second: You may be define the function with the same name. It will be overwritten. It's bad. You may declare like that

declare -f new_function_name=old_function_name 

and only after that do import. So you may call old function by new name.
Third: You may import only full list of functions defined in file. If some not needed you may unset them. But if you rewrite your functions after unset they will be lost. But if you set reference to it as described above you may restore after unset with the same name.
Finally In common procedure of import is dangerous and not so simple. Be careful! You may write script to do this more easier and safe. If you use only part of functions(not all) better split them in different files. Unfortunately this technique not made well in bash. In python for example and some other script languages it's easy and safe. Possible to make partial import only needed functions with its own names. We all want that in next bush versions will be done the same functionality. But now We must write many additional cod so as to do what you want.

  • (Welcome to SO!) As user Praveen was last seen in 2011, it is bound to be difficult to sort out whether the question was how to make the shell executing a.sh execute b.sh (and continue executing a.sh if not commanded otherwise), or to literally call b.sh. (My spelling checker doesn't catch bush versions.) (Do you have someone to turn to to help you with English grammar? (Sometimes wish I had.)) – greybeard Aug 19 '17 at 18:38

protected by Vamsi Prabhala Mar 21 at 17:18

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